Sunday, August 24th 2008

DDR3 to DDR4 Transition Chalked-out, DDR4 in 2012

The transition between PC memory standards has always relied on changes in PC platforms for effectiveness. For example, the LGA 775 saw transition between two standards, the i915 MCH supported DDR and DDR2 memory, i925 onwards it became mandatory for people to use DDR2 memory as the platform required it. In came DDR3 and it became optional for users to choose it over DDR2. Even now, there is only a gradual transit between DDR2 and DDR3. With Nehalem however, it will become mandatory to use DDR3 memory, both with the LGA 1366 and LGA 1160 socket motherboards in either two or three channel configurations.

Qimonda has already chalked out plans for a smooth transition to DDR4 PC memory. According to Qimonda's development plan, DDR4 would be out by 2012. The memory standard will operate at (DDR) frequencies as high as 2,133 MHz at an approximate voltage of 1.2 V and by 2013, we could be seeing 2,667 MHz memory at 1.0 V, a phase during which there's a transition between the current DDR3 and future DDR4 PC memory standards.

Source: Hardspell
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36 Comments on DDR3 to DDR4 Transition Chalked-out, DDR4 in 2012

#1
Darkrealms
imperialreign said:
well . . . technically, there are slight differences between SYS DRAM and GPU DRAM. it's nothing dramatic, really, but the differences equate to GDRAM being developed for use and access by GPUs; they respond faster, tend to be more efficient and are capable of running at much faster speeds than their equivalent SYS DRAM components. The biggest difference between the two varieties, is that GDDR# can turn on a MEM bank and read from it within the same clock cycle, whereas SYS DDR# can't.

Otherwise GDDR# operates at a theorhetical level the same as DDR#.
I understand there are differences. I don't know much into the details. I was just saying to the average consumer. In a year they will be looking at GPUs running on DDR5 and still be sitting with DDR3 as the big thing in their systems. Don't we already have enough confusion out their for them. LoL
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#2
Hamsterbytes
where is DDR4

Where is ddr4? It is now 2013 and I have seen nothing mention or for sale. Too bad gddr5 isn't being used for pc memory since it is the fastest out there.
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#4
erocker
Senior Moderator
Hamsterbytes said:
Where is ddr4? It is now 2013 and I have seen nothing mention or for sale. Too bad gddr5 isn't being used for pc memory since it is the fastest out there.
Delays: (one of many news articles on it) http://www.techhive.com/article/2034175/adoption-of-ddr4-memory-facing-delays.html

Haswell-E to use DDR4 memory: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Haswell-E-DDR4-Ivy-Bridge,22022.html

It's coming, just not on schedule like most PC tech.
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#7
D007
Sounds about as useful as a third leg... They could make DDR 5000.
Won't make a difference, because no systems will do any better due to it..
Only people who want Epeen will buy this stuff.
People who know how useless it is, won't..
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#8
erocker
Senior Moderator
D007 said:
Sounds about as useful as a third leg... They could make DDR 5000.
Won't make a difference, because no systems will do any better due to it..
Only people who want Epeen will buy this stuff.
People who know how useless it is, won't..
No, not really. It's the progression of things. DDR4 is the next step. It will use less power and offer more bandwidth for future systems. Look at DDR, DDR2 and where they sit performance-wise today. Besides, we wont' see DDR4 until Haswell-E later next year. It won't be mainstream until 2015.
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#9
D007
erocker said:
No, not really. It's the progression of things. DDR4 is the next step. It will use less power and offer more bandwidth for future systems. Look at DDR, DDR2 and where they sit performance-wise today.
Yea, but now a days, I could use ddr3 1600 or ddr3 2000 and it won't make a difference..
So DDR4, I'm not holding my breath. XD
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#10
McSteel
Yes, and it hardly made any difference if you used DDR-333 or DDR-400, DDR2-677 or DDR2-1066... It all stayed inside 5%, for most applications and games.

But comparing DDR-400 and DDR2-1066, what do you get?
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#11
Prima.Vera
Hamsterbytes said:
Where is ddr4? It is now 2013 and I have seen nothing mention or for sale. Too bad gddr5 isn't being used for pc memory since it is the fastest out there.
So you just signed up for the forum to dig out from the graves an ancient thread... :laugh:
Btw GDDR5 is based on DDR3 but is specially designed for graphics intense tasks.
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