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Corsair Vengeance LPX 3600-CL18 OC for Ryzen 5 3600

Joined
Aug 10, 2019
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System Name Matisse
Processor AMD Ryzen 5 3600
Motherboard Asus Prime X470-Pro
Cooling Scythe Mugen 5 PCGH Edition
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK16GX4M2D3600C18
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GT 1030 Silent Low Profile 2GB GDDR5
Storage Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB
Display(s) Dell UltraSharp U2415 (2x)
Case Fractal Design Define R5 Black
Audio Device(s) Audioengine D3 USB DAC + Audioengine A5+ Black
Power Supply Be quiet! Straight Power 11 450W
Mouse Logitech MX1100R Wireless Rechargeable Laser Mouse
Keyboard Logitech Cordless Desktop Wave Pro
I've recently done a new build based on a Ryzen 5 3600. I haven't done any overclocking since the early 2000's, but as Zen CPU's pretty effectively OC themselves and can benefit from quick memory, I'm curious what I can get out of my RAM. Just for fun, btw, nothing too extravagant. I want to keep the system rock solid.
I paired the Ryzen 5 3600 with an Asus Prime X470-Pro, and spent slightly more on the RAM compared to an ordinary 3200MHz CL16 set: I went for a Corsair Vengeance LPX kit at 3600MHz CL18-22-22-42.
After reading up on RAM OC'ing a bit, I found the DRAM Calculator for Ryzen on TPU. Helpful tool, definitely! To figure out which chips are on the DIMMs, I used Thaiphoon Burned. It tells me it has Micron E dies.

This is what the calc suggests as safe settings:
DRAMCalc_3600_Safe.png
I started extremely conservative, and after a few iterations I currently have CL16, tRCDrd 19, tRCDwr 16, tRP 16, tRAS 36. Still at 1.35V btw.
I tried getting tRCDrd under 19, but I can't get the system completely stable, even after cranking up the voltage to 1.4V which the calc suggests as max.
The more secondary timings I pretty much left as is, for now. I had a little experiment with Trdwr, tFAW and ProcODT, but that miserably fails. I reverted them back to auto.

I'm looking for a little guidance here, how to progress...
What's the deal with the tRCDrd? How could I get it from 19 to the suggested 17. A higher voltage? Or do the other mentioned voltages in the calc play a role?
Secondly, how do I best test stability? I now use the MEMbench that comes with the calc as a quick 5min check. If there aren't any popups running the test, I do a +30min Prime95 run. No errors there I consider the settings stable.
How do I test whether a change actually improves performance, and with how much? Till now, I looked at the time MEMbench needs to run. I'm now at 300.14 sec. A little experiment moving from 3600 to 3733MHz actually resulted in a 1.5% perf loss: 304.66s. So is this a good tool to make an evaluation, or is there better out there?
 
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System Name Q
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.6 Ghz / 3.2 Ghz Mesh (daily)
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 120mm Custom Liquid
Memory 32 GB Quad 3733 Mhz DDR4 16-17-17-36-400 trfc - 2T
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the TRFC is the timing you want to get as low as possible (400? less?).

I personally like stability testing with Forza Horizon 4 - drive around for about 30 mins followed by a few hours of aida stability test stressing memory.

I also like to test performance using Far Cry 5 benchmark (VERY latency sensitive) as well as AIDA 64 memory test.
 
Joined
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Some good News for you: tRCDRD and tRCDWR has very little impact to performance. tCL and tRFC on the other hand matters a lot. You may not notice any difference in games or apps what-so-ever With 18\19 on tRCDRD and tRCDWR, especially tRCDRD is really Close tied to stability and lowering it affects stability a lot.

My suggestion: Try 16-19-18-36 and try lowering tRFC (along With CL it is usually the value that affects gaming the most). Micron has the most problems With low tRFC, but maybe you can try 550, then lower to 500 etc. tRFC has a tendency to be totally stable at one value, if you lower it by 5, then you can`t boot all of a sudden.
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2019
Messages
2 (0.22/day)
System Name Matisse
Processor AMD Ryzen 5 3600
Motherboard Asus Prime X470-Pro
Cooling Scythe Mugen 5 PCGH Edition
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK16GX4M2D3600C18
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GT 1030 Silent Low Profile 2GB GDDR5
Storage Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB
Display(s) Dell UltraSharp U2415 (2x)
Case Fractal Design Define R5 Black
Audio Device(s) Audioengine D3 USB DAC + Audioengine A5+ Black
Power Supply Be quiet! Straight Power 11 450W
Mouse Logitech MX1100R Wireless Rechargeable Laser Mouse
Keyboard Logitech Cordless Desktop Wave Pro
For tRFC I got a bit confused with what the calc suggested: 630 and alt 560. When I look in the BIOS (well, I should say UEFI) it's set to 'auto' with an actual value of 312 (and tRFC2 192, tRFC4 132). So, that's good, right? Lower is better for this one?
I can try to reduce CL to 15 or 14. I haven't tried anything lower than 16 so far. Any other timings I could focus on?

About the game tests. You should know I'm not a gamer, at all. Not since the early 2000's, like my previous OC experience. To run the FC5 benchmark, I assume you need to buy the game, right? Or can you download just the benchmark somewhere?
I already had a look at AIDA64 Extreme earlier this week, but I don't want to spend $40 on a license for this kind of thing. It would made more sense to have spent it on higher-spec RAM :rolleyes: The trial version only shows some of the values, so basically not that useful.
I'm looking for some freeware tool (at least something dirt cheap). Something like that MEMbench that comes with the calc. Or is it good enough to evaluate performance gain/loss?
 
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