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Intel q6600 go temp help please

Discussion in 'RealTemp' started by Sxx, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. overclocking101

    overclocking101

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    your Q6600 is far better than my Q6600!! I need 1.37V just to run at 3.5GHZ!! nice cpu man! just remember overclocking is like an addiction like a drug once you get the itch its hard to stop :)
     
  2. Hayder_Master

    Hayder_Master

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    don't worry about temps, INTEL say the 65nm cpu's max temp between 60c-65c so keep it under 70c will be fine
     
  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb RealTemp Author

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    mankind: When calibrating, for maximum accuracy, you need to run Prime95 - Small FFTs. It does an excellent job of equally loading each core which is needed to see how the 4 cores compare. Does CPU-Z report your CPU as a B3 or G0 stepping? Post another cool down test using Small FFTs and I'll recommend a calibration for you. When uncalibrated, many Q6600 CPUs follow a very similar pattern with TJMax of Core 2 actually being 5C higher than the default TJMax for Core 0/Core 1. There's a strong possibility that Intel did this deliberately to help prevent all 4 cores from reaching the thermal throttling point at the exact same time. Throttling only one core at a time is usually enough to control heat so offsetting TJMax slightly from one core to the next maintains maximum performance without excessive throttling all at once.

    hayder.master: The Intel specification number you posted can only be accurately measured by cutting a groove into the top of the heat spreader of your CPU and mounting a thermocouple at the geometric center. That's the Intel recommended method to measure that. The average user is not going to do that to their CPU so for them, that Intel spec is meaningless. There is no software that can accurately measure this temperature without hacking up your CPU.

    That's why Intel added core temperature sensors to their CPUs and located them at the hottest spots on each core. The hottest spot on the core when running a stress testing program like Prime95 can be 25C hotter than the above measured temperature. As long as your CPU is not thermal throttling, it can still be running within spec.

    RealTemp reports the status of the thermal throttling bit directly. In the Thermal Status area of RealTemp, OK means that your CPU is running within spec. LOG means that at least one thermal throttling episode has been logged since you powered on your computer. HOT means that your CPU is presently thermal throttling. The best part about this bit is that it is stored in the CPU and even a millisecond of throttling can trigger this bit and leave a record of what happened. You don't need to have RealTemp running at the time. If you start RealTemp after a thermal throttling episode, it will check this bit and immediately report it as LOG even if your CPU has now cooled off. You can run RealTemp after a game or after some heavy use and it will tell you if it ever reached the thermal throttling point.

    If it shows OK then everything is OK and as long as your computer is 100% stable then there isn't any need to worry about your CPU's temperature.
     
  4. mankind New Member

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    Ok, small FFT's :-

    [​IMG]

    It's a G0 Q6600 running at 3.6Ghz 1.37v actual.
     
  5. unclewebb

    unclewebb RealTemp Author

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    These sensors have two types of error. Differences in TJMax and slope error. Slope error means that the further you get away from the Intel calibration point, the more these sensors will start to wander and either read a little too high or a little too low.

    By running Small FFTs and getting your CPU core temperature as high as you did, you have got to the point where these sensors have almost no slope error so the differences in the 4 cores at full load is all due to differences in how Intel sets TJMax. The default TJMax for a Q6600 - G0 that I recommend is 100C. Your G0 is exactly like the G0 I tested and I came to the conclusion that actual TJMax is closer to 105C on the second CPU (core 2 and core 3).

    I would adjust TJMax to 100, 100, 105, 105. I believe that adjustment will give you very accurate core temperatures at full load. The theory behind this calibration is that when you have 4 cores all sitting very close to each other, all covered by the same heatsink and all running the same code, the core temperature for all 4 cores is going to be identical. Heat transfer is very efficient.

    When there is a large difference in load from core to core you can have instances where the peak core temperature of one core can be different than the core that it is sitting beside but when both cores of a dual core are fully loaded, the majority of difference you see is sensor error and not a difference in actual temperature.

    After this first calibration step, now you have to look at the slope error issue at idle. Some of your sensors likely read too high while others read too low at idle. Based on the data you've shown me so far, all I can do is guess at this. If at idle your actual core temperature across your 4 cores is 50C, you could use a negative calibration factor on core 0 to reduce its reported temperature, a similar positive calibration factor on core 1 to increase its temperature, core 2 looks fine if you are using the correct TJMax of 105 and core 3 would need a calibration factor about twice as big as core 0 or core 1 and it would need to be positive to bring it up to 50C.

    After doing this the best test is to then go into your bios and lock your computer at 6x266 ~1600 MHz and drop your core voltage as low as it can go and then boot up and compare your reported core temperature to your water temperature if you are water cooled or to your air temperature with your case open. This can give you some idea how accurate your calibration is. Depending on what type of cooler you are using, you can tell if this calibration is accurate or out to lunch.

    Do I recommend calibrating inaccurate and poorly documented sensors. Not really. Will a calibration make these sensors 100% accurate from idle to TJMax? No, that's impossible since these sensors have too many issues. The recommended calibration might make your temps a little more accurate but it involves a lot of guessing and assumptions. Most users are probably better off realizing that these sensors were never designed to be used for accurate temperature monitoring. Some CPUs are better than others at getting reasonably accurate data out of them while many 45nn Quads border on the impossible.

    I don't worry too much about temps any more. Run your CPU as cool as possible and don't let it thermal throttle and it will run just fine.
     
    mankind says thanks.
  6. mankind New Member

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    Nice one matey, thanks a bunch :)
     
  7. Sxx New Member

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    Dropped mine done to 3.4ghz, And cleared my cables in my antec case cable tied them and put some more mx-2 on it temps dropped by 10c now idle now at 32c and max load 46c
     
  8. mankind New Member

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    You water cooled?
     
  9. Sxx New Member

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    No sir i put another fan and tied it to my xigmatek 1283v so i have two fans pulling air through it, Then i cabled tied all my cables so they are not in the way this time they was a mess before,
    its running at 3.4ghz with 1,28 vcore voltage, plus i reapplied my tim-mx-2 again...
     

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