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My new Platinum psu died after one day of gaming!

ArkJinx7

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I built my own gaming pc last year. After finally getting the monitor for it recently, I
tried to fire it up but I only was able to enjoy one session of gaming, but oh it was so nice!
I was super careful, followed all of the manual instructions and even had my brother help
me along the way with some things. I double, triple and beyond checked all of my connections.
I used pcpartpicker to make sure that all of my parts would be compatible with each other.
My gpu recommended a 600 watt psu, so I got the evga 650 P2, which was one of the
best rated psu's on JonnyGuru.com So what did I do to mess everything up? Or what did
my ups do? (or my psu for that matter!?)

I had a platinum evga P2 650 psu die on me, probably because I accidently overloaded the ups system it was
plugged into. Now I need a new psu for 650 watts that is highly rated to perform well and have a lower
chance of it dying and taking out other hardware with it. Not that I think the evga psu did..I checked my
pc components after it popped and my MB and gpu seemed to be okay. I didn't smell any smoke or see
any burnt marks. I think my ups might of helped save my other pc parts by forcing the psu to shut off before
it could do anything really crazy. My ups by Cyberpower is rated for up to 810 watts. It had a error code after
the psu went out, meaning that it wanted me to unplug an electronic from the ups and then turn it back on.
At first I just thought it went out because it was faulty, which might still be the case as well.

My gaming pc specs are..


Asus tuf gaming wifi plus motherboard
Ryzen 7 3700x
Crucial ballistix elite 16 gig x1 ddr4 3200 cl16
Samsung 970 evo plus 250 gig m.2 2280 nvme ssd
Gigabtye Radoen RX 5700 xt 8 g OC
Lian Li Lancool II-W atx mid-tower
Evga P2 750 watt 80+ platinum atx psu
Asus tuf gaming 1440p VG27AQ 165 Hz Monitor

The day before I was running my new gaming rig just fine and I also had my Dell pc plugged in.
But my evga psu must have overloaded my ups the next day because its inrush current spiked too high
for the ups to handle upon start up. Here's how it all happened..

I was on my old Dell pc, which probably only runs on a couple hundred watts, and after I was finishing
up some work, I leaned over to start up my gaming pc, first forgeting to shutdown my Dell and unplug
it from the ups first, just to be on the safe side to not overload it. I got a loud pop and a brief flash of light
from the case and then my ups starting emitting a loud constant beep with an error code "F02". My
ups is the LX1325gu by Cyberpower. After that I tried to plug back in my gaming psu (evga 650 P2)
and flip the power switch in the back, but every time I did my ups hit me with the same error message.
After a few tries the psu didn't even seem to do anything anymore after I reset my ups. I tested the
psu with a MB 24 pin power tester and the fan didn't spin nor did I see any power light come on.

How can I make sure that my next psu won't do the same thing to my gaming pc, assuming that
all of my other components are okay? I still want to go with another 650 W psu. But I'm trying
to find a good rated one for reliability, performance and safety. They seem kind of hard to find
and there just isn't enough information about the longer term performance of psu's by its actual
users online. I've been reading psu reviews on Amazon and it seems that a lot of users report bad
reviews of their psu dying and taking other pc components with it for most of the psu brands but
not evga as much as the others. This almost makes it seem that the brand evga is more safe and
reliable than say, Corsair or Thermaltake. What do you guys think?

As for where I will plug my new psu, i still prefer to have it plugged into my ups (as long as it
doesn't get overloaded) I tried to look up some info on my ups about its watt power limits
on the battery back up side, which includes AVR. However I couldn't find much of anything
on that. I assume it has the same watt limits on either surge only or surge plus battery
protection outlets. I also thought of getting a good quality surge power strip to maybe
just plug my gaming pc into that. But then I thought what if I only use my ups for just
my gaming psu, the asus monitor and my modem and router? That would only produce up
to 700 watts with a 650 psu. The gaming Asus monitor uses 27 watts, the modem only uses 9
watts and I couldn't find out what my router uses but I'm guessing only like another 9 to 12
watts. There shouldn't be any chance of a ups overload then, right? My ups is rated for 810
watts.
 
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do you experience regular or constant power losses? if not, you shouldnt need a UPS . i have never used one, & i have never had a PSU die. not to say my experience is the rule, but just my experience.
the other likely culprit is human error ,no offense, its just a matter of likelihood.

id read the PSU manufacturers warranty carefully, they may have stipulations if a power bank or UPS is involved in critical failure. it might be something you want to omit when reaching out for RMA.

i wont begin to try & guess why it happened.
good luck
 
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Did you double check it after it sat unplugged for a few hours. It might just be the overload protection
 
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So the ups is giving error but the psu is ok? My cyberpower ups does the exact opposite of what it's supposed to, when it senses current drop it turns itself off immediately and everything connected to it loses power. Every ups I have used has died on me randomly out of nowhere (3 or 4 apc and the latest was the cyberpower), but I live in an area that gets power outages if the weather is bad so I figure get a ups for the pc, they work ok for a while and do what they're supposed to a few times then one day they don't trigger when the power goes out and refuse to ever again.

Unless you're doing critical tasks just forget the ups and get a good surge protector, in my experience they are a waste of money.
 
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Hi,
I have the GX3125U and it's been a pretty good back up system
It's on my entertainment center which the computer there can't be overclocked it's just a Q9550 system/ t.v./ yamaha receiver/ dvd player so I have no complaints on the unit.

All my psu's are P2 series 850p2 on the q9550 1000p2 on my 10900k system and 1200p2 on my 9940x system.

I'd check the wall outlet and all outlets on the same circuit make sure they are all the wires are tight and also they are grounded properly.
Also see how many other items are on the same circuit and what size bracker you have 10-15-20amp might need to relocate so of them or even the computer it's self or run a new line.
 

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Have you tried an RMA?
 

ArkJinx7

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do you experience regular or constant power losses? if not, you shouldnt need a UPS . i have never used one, & i have never had a PSU die. not to say my experience is the rule, but just my experience.
the other likely culprit is human error ,no offense, its just a matter of likelihood.

id read the PSU manufacturers warranty carefully, they may have stipulations if a power bank or UPS is involved in critical failure. it might be something you want to omit when reaching out for RMA.

i wont begin to try & guess why it happened.
good luck
Thanks so much to everyone trying to help me with your helpful comments! That was not really expected.
So yes, at certain random times, I would have my main power just suddenly go out in the neighborhood.
Of course every now and then from the short random thunder storm as well. So I got tired of all of that and
got myself a good ups. I just got used to plugging all of my main important electronics into it. And yes, you
are right. My psu likely died on me because I overloaded it from my ups overloading. I wouldn't of thought
the inrush current could be SO high on the psu to cause a power start up spike but apparently that's what
happened according to my ups. It's rated for only up to 810 watts.

Did you double check it after it sat unplugged for a few hours. It might just be the overload protection
No I did not! This might be something to try, thanks! I only tried to run a motherboard power
test with the provided psu power 24 pin tester about 10 minutes after it popped on me and
tripped my ups. Could it be possible that my psu would still work fine after that bad incident?
I believe that the rest of my pc components are okay but I'm not 100% sure yet. Can a regular
power surge protector strip help protect the psu from damaging the rest of my pc components,
similar to what my ups does? If so, I'll just use a power surge strip in the future with my gaming pc.
What type of strip should I get?

So the ups is giving error but the psu is ok? My cyberpower ups does the exact opposite of what it's supposed to, when it senses current drop it turns itself off immediately and everything connected to it loses power. Every ups I have used has died on me randomly out of nowhere (3 or 4 apc and the latest was the cyberpower), but I live in an area that gets power outages if the weather is bad so I figure get a ups for the pc, they work ok for a while and do what they're supposed to a few times then one day they don't trigger when the power goes out and refuse to ever again.

Unless you're doing critical tasks just forget the ups and get a good surge protector, in my experience they are a waste of money.
The ups gave a battery output short error and told me to unplug something and then restart it. It was too much power
for it to draw from my gaming evga 650 P2 psu. Maybe my psu ws just faulty? However I'm not sure yet if my psu is
okay or not? The fan would not spin at all earlier after 10 minutes of it popping when I tested it away from the rest
of the computer components. But I haven't tried yet since the incident to test it again for normal power opperation.
Hmm, I see. Thank you for your input experience with using ups system, this is very helpful! From what I know about apc
ups products, they aren't as good in quality as cyberpower ones. I've been very happy with my cyberpower ups so far
since I bought it last year. It has already saved my older Dell computer from randomly turning off or restarting due
to a sudden spike in my power or from a thunder storm. I was able to save my work and keep my pc on until the main
power came back on. I also have my ethernet plugged into it for extra added protection.

So for the purpose of what I do on my Dell computer and using with my internet modem and router (monitor included)
my ups is definitely worth it! However when gaming I'm not doing anything very critical (well unless I'm in a good battle
royale match and about to win before the power cuts out) so I wouldn't see myself really needing to be plugged into my
ups. So I will take your advice on that one, thanks!

Hi,
I have the GX3125U and it's been a pretty good back up system
It's on my entertainment center which the computer there can't be overclocked it's just a Q9550 system/ t.v./ yamaha receiver/ dvd player so I have no complaints on the unit.

All my psu's are P2 series 850p2 on the q9550 1000p2 on my 10900k system and 1200p2 on my 9940x system.

I'd check the wall outlet and all outlets on the same circuit make sure they are all the wires are tight and also they are grounded properly.
Also see how many other items are on the same circuit and what size bracker you have 10-15-20amp might need to relocate so of them or even the computer it's self or run a new line.
A while back we had a electition come in a upgrade most of our outlets to handle more power drawed from them
so they wouldn't trip the power as easily. SInce that upgrade we haven't really had any bad power trips, so I don't
think that would be an issue. Also if the outlet wasn't grounded properly, my ups would alert me of this.
The said outlet that my ups is plugged into "might" have not been one of the outlets that were "upgraded"
because when the electritian was here, I had some stuff in their way, blocking access to a few of my outlets and
I was busy and they just said, whatever and left. I know, probably not a good move. But like I said we haven't
had any bad power trips on any of our outlets since the upgrade. Also I believe that my said wall outlet that the
ups is plugged into is only a 15 amp. Would this be a problem with a 650 watt psu or a 810 watt rated ups?

Have you tried an RMA?
Not yet but I did register my psu on evga's site and upload my invoice to help speed up a
possible rma process. Apparently I'd have to pay over 20 in shipping and other possible fees.
I already spent over 100 on this psu, and that was for a good deal brand new unit. I rather not
end up speeding another 30 to 50 bucks just to have them tell me that they won't issue a replacement
or repair. I read though their limited warranty terms and they said they don't do rma's for power
short accidents, which is likely what my case is. So it sounds like there would be a very slim chance
of getting approved for a rma, unless my psu was actually defective and they could determine this
upon inspection. Right now I'm just trying to figure out what was the real cause of my psu dying on
me. From what I gather at this point, it appears to be human error unfortunately. Evga just sent me
a message, lets see what they have to say and if they might be willing to issue me a rma. But I will
also try testing my psu again like suggested to see if it might be working again now. (I'd be so happy!)
 
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A surge protector will protect it from a lighting strike and that's about it. If you house has wiring problems, or your live in a country that has dirty power might be an issue. But try it again. It might have been a short and it triggered the protection. It will reset itself.
 

ArkJinx7

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A surge protector will protect it from a lighting strike and that's about it. If you house has wiring problems, or your live in a country that has dirty power might be an issue. But try it again. It might have been a short and it triggered the protection. It will reset itself.
Okay thanks. Do you happen to know weather or not a ups or just a surge protector strip can help shut down a
psu before it might damage other important pc hardware like the gpu or motherboard?
 
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Only a UPS can do an auto shutdown in case of power failure
 

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Okay thanks. Do you happen to know weather or not a ups or just a surge protector strip can help shut down a
psu before it might damage other important pc hardware like the gpu or motherboard?
Only the PSU is going to be able to protect the hardware its connected to if the PSU is the component that failed, nothing before that part of chain can help. That said a good surge protector will protect your PSU from power spikes and potentially help protect the hardware connected to the PSU.

I don't think any of that really matters for what happened here though. From the sounds of things either your PSU was simply faulty and something failed internally or something failed within the UPS and most likely took the PSU with it, hopefully the protection in the PSU protected your hardware. Either way its simply hardware failure and nothing you did was wrong' you certainly didn't overload the UPS with a load like that.

This is a long thread so maybe I missed it but have you tested the UPS after all this? If it was the PSU that failed that would certainly account for the error your are getting. You'll probably need to reset the UPS to clear that error but after that I would test it with by hooking up a lamp or something simple to the battery output and disconnect it from the AC.
 

ArkJinx7

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I did a power on test again with my evga psu, still no fan spin or power indication. I'm afraid it's full on dead.
I went ahead afterwards and finished disconnecting all of its power cables still inside my gaming pc
and stored them all back in the psu box. I had a better look at my motherboard input slot, the cpu input
and my gpu and they all look fine. So my pc will probably be ready for the next psu I install later.
This time I won't be connecting the computer to my ups. I'll just use a good power strip. My question
earlier was not if my ups can shut down my psu due to a power surge, I already know that it could
do that. I meant can a ups do any better at safeguarding my pc components from damage than a
simple power surge strip? I ask because I'm afraid of what might happen to my expensive pc components
if my psu goes boom and it's not plugged into the ups. Or am I just thinking about this the wrong way?

I feel like I need to contact my ups's customer service and ask them about it. evga sent me a simple
message earlier encouraging me to submit a rma request for approval. I did a follow up question
asking them if a power short (not indicating that it would be caused by a ups) to the psu could
not be supported by their limited warranty. They will probably say yes, in which case I'm out 115
bucks. I've been seriously considering going with the Seasonic focus 750 px platinum psu, which
is among one of the best rated psu's for performance, reliability and quality. The only possible
red flags on it are the higher than usual 230VAC inrush current spike at 60! EMI spikes and high
capped OCP on the 12V rail and the 5VSb rail. Otherwise it is the one of the highest preforming
psu in its watt class around! There are also a few scary bad reviews for it on Amazon from users saying
that it died on them and took out pc hardware with it. My other strong contender is the rmx 750
gold V2, which has a much better 5VSB rail and a lower controlled inrush current.
 
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If you go off Amazon or Newegg reviews, any and every product will have someone claiming it exploded and killed their family. That's why experienced PSU reviewers like aris and oklahomawolf exist, because random online user reviews are about as useful as reading WebMD when you have a cough.

You probably just got a dud. And no, it's extremely unlikely that your UPS did that to your PSU, whether it's from APC, Cyber or Tripp-Lite. And no, if the power in your area is not reliable, a surge protector won't save your data from jack shit. Even in terms of mild surges alone, a surge protector is more a one-off; a decent midrange to high end PSU with AVR will mitigate surges and continue doing so.

The Focus PX is an excellent line of PSUs. If it's a good price, don't feel bad about picking one up.

The EVGA has a warranty. Stop trying to give them reasons to deny you warranty. Say the PSU died, say you tested all the other parts with something else, leave the rest to them.
 
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ive used seasonic focus+ PSU's for several of my personal builds, theyre rock solid. phanteks makes a great PSU too, so does evga and several other manufacturers. in my experience/opinion, id say lose the ups, theyre like static wrist straps, a device not required for most home users.
 

ArkJinx7

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Only the PSU is going to be able to protect the hardware its connected to if the PSU is the component that failed, nothing before that part of chain can help. That said a good surge protector will protect your PSU from power spikes and potentially help protect the hardware connected to the PSU.

I don't think any of that really matters for what happened here though. From the sounds of things either your PSU was simply faulty and something failed internally or something failed within the UPS and most likely took the PSU with it, hopefully the protection in the PSU protected your hardware. Either way its simply hardware failure and nothing you did was wrong' you certainly didn't overload the UPS with a load like that.

This is a long thread so maybe I missed it but have you tested the UPS after all this? If it was the PSU that failed that would certainly account for the error your are getting. You'll probably need to reset the UPS to clear that error but after that I would test it with by hooking up a lamp or something simple to the battery output and disconnect it from the AC.
Thank you very much for this response! This is the kind of helpful response I was waiting for. So a ups wouldn't
do any better at protecting my other hardware that the psu is connected to, if anything, it would only
over complicant things? I don't think anything failed on my ups. After I reset it and unplugged my psu from
it was working just fine like usual. I have my trusty Dell pc plugged into it right now as I'm typing this message
out. So like you said it must of just been a faulty psu. I wouldn't be surprised if my ups accidently took out
my psu in its automated safety process though. Thankfully I think the safety current protection in the psu
did its job and protected the rest of my pc hardware. It makes me feel better about this whole issue hearing
that I didn't do anything wrong, thank you! I was thinking the very same thing too, it seemed unlikely that
the inrush current from my psu would cause a power spike "that high"! I read a review on my psu and its
rated inrush currents are within normal levels around 30-40 on both V. I did test the psu, twice now. The
second time well after giving it time to reset on its own and still nothing. No need to reset my ups, I
think it has already been reset. And I did the tests connected to another outlet away from the ups.

What do you mean hooking up a lamp? Oh you mean connect the lamp to the psu's AC? That would
void my warranty. But if I end up never sending it off for a rma, I guess I could try this, thanks.
This place is wonderful, so much good advice and helpful tips. I also discovered that Techpowerup
has lots of great psu reviews similar to Tomshardware, which I love.
 
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Operandi

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Depends on the UPS but a good one will do a better job than just a power strip which is only going to protect against surges. My APC UPS does line correction filtering (probably not the right term) that is always correcting the voltage. Some UPSs are more simple that just kick into battery when voltage drops below a threshold. It sounds like yours is also correcting the lien voltage. Short version; a UPS will help your PSU out in giving it the voltage and power it expects but ultimately if something goes wrong its up the protection in the PSU to protect yoru CPU, GPU, motherboard ect.

Yeah, your PSU is certainly dead but did you test the UPS? Put something simple on the battery backup section and cut power to it like I asked in my previous post?

Ok, just read your most recent post, so the UPS works.

With the lamp thing. Just hook a lamp or something similar to the UPS to test its battery output and unplug the UPS from the AC to test it to make sure its good. It sounds like its fine and I doubt it was the cause but it would be good to make sure and also know that it wasn't damaged when the PSU failed.
 
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ArkJinx7

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If you go off Amazon or Newegg reviews, any and every product will have someone claiming it exploded and killed their family. That's why experienced PSU reviewers like aris and oklahomawolf exist, because random online user reviews are about as useful as reading WebMD when you have a cough.

You probably just got a dud. And no, it's extremely unlikely that your UPS did that to your PSU, whether it's from APC, Cyber or Tripp-Lite. And no, if the power in your area is not reliable, a surge protector won't save your data from jack shit. Even in terms of mild surges alone, a surge protector is more a one-off; a decent midrange to high end PSU with AVR will mitigate surges and continue doing so.

The Focus PX is an excellent line of PSUs. If it's a good price, don't feel bad about picking one up.

The EVGA has a warranty. Stop trying to give them reasons to deny you warranty. Say the PSU died, say you tested all the other parts with something else, leave the rest to them.
I love Aris's psu reviews! They have been very helpful in determining which psu I should go with. Also the
psu I already got from reading Oklahomawolf's great reviews was probably one of the best mid range psu's
I could of ever hoped to acquire. Too bad it died so soon. Maybe that's why it was being sold from a ebay
auction? Could of fooled me though, it looked very brand new to me inside the box. Now that you mention AVR.
I'm reminded that I had the psu plugged into the surge plus battery outlet on my ups, which includes AVR
protection. Well the psu already had AVR protection, as part of it's power protection suit. Could this be what
caused my psu to die a miserable brutal death? So I shouldn't even worry about protecting my higher end
psu like perhaps the Seasonic focus PX 750 with even a surge protection power strip? I should just plug it
right into the wall? Okay, I will do that, about the evga rma claim. You're right! Why be fully honest with
a faulty psu with a ten year warranty!? I'm so new to all of this type of stuff.

One more question, should I be concerned about a higher than 50V inrush current coming from the
230VAC? I read here that anything pass 50 is a big concern. I don't want my new Seasonic PX popping
on me at start up and taking out my cpu or motherboard with it in a blazing fire!

Oh okay you meant plug in a lamp into my ups since they draw a lot of power I guess and see
if it trips the ups again. Hmm, I could try that later but I'll have to see if I have a good lamp
to test it with.
 
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I love Aris's psu reviews! They have been very helpful in determining which psu I should go with. Also the
psu I already got from reading Oklahomawolf's great reviews was probably one of the best mid range psu's
I could of ever hoped to acquire. Too bad it died so soon. Maybe that's why it was being sold from a ebay
auction? Could of fooled me though, it looked very brand new to me inside the box. Now that you mention AVR.
I'm reminded that I had the psu plugged into the surge plus battery outlet on my ups, which includes AVR
protection. Well the psu already had AVR protection, as part of it's power protection suit. Could this be what
caused my psu to die a miserable brutal death? So I shouldn't even worry about protecting my higher end
psu like perhaps the Seasonic focus PX 750 with even a surge protection power strip? I should just plug it
right into the wall? Okay, I will do that, about the evga rma claim. You're right! Why be fully honest with
a faulty psu with a ten year warranty!? I'm so new to all of this type of stuff.

One more question, should I be concerned about a higher than 50V inrush current coming from the
230VAC? I read here that anything pass 50 is a big concern. I don't want my new Seasonic PX popping
on me at start up and taking out my cpu or motherboard with it in a blazing fire!

It's really not that big a deal......the problem with the PSU reviews is that being as detailed as they are, people love taking little details and taking them out of the overall context. Even the best PSUs I've seen over the years you can find a "problem" if you really wanted to find one, whether it's high inrush, insufficient hold-up time, efficiency at low loads, minor rail regulation not perfect, etc. They make a note of something when they come across it, but if it doesn't even appear as a passing remark in the conclusion section, that shows you exactly how important a problem aris or OW thinks it is...

When it comes to the RMA, be forthcoming and provide only as much info as is necessary to support your case or instill a sense of trust in the other party. Don't try and do their job for them trying to brainstorm ideas - that's what they're paid to do. All you're doing is putting ideas in their heads that they can use as excuses to tell you "sorry, that's not covered by our policy", and possibly pissing them off as a customer that won't stop trying to do their job for them.

I think you read the new Connect 750 review, the one has a whole power backplane connected to it (and even then, inrush was nothing more than a passing remark). The PX 750 review doesn't mention inrush current as a problem. And in the PX review, this should tell you everything about how aris tests things:

Code:
However, since all of our tests allow us to be extra picky, we did spot a couple of areas where there is room for improvement.

RMA the EVGA. If it doesn't succeed for some odd reason, look at the Seasonic.
 

ArkJinx7

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I'm pretty sure that my ups battery is good. I just bought it last year. But a test makes good since
to make sure that the battery didn't get damaged by the psu, thank you! But even if my psu did
damage my ups, evga will never pay for any damages. Which pretty much goes for any psu brand.

It's really not that big a deal......the problem with the PSU reviews is that being as detailed as they are, people love taking little details and taking them out of the overall context. Even the best PSUs I've seen over the years you can find a "problem" if you really wanted to find one, whether it's high inrush, insufficient hold-up time, efficiency at low loads, minor rail regulation not perfect, etc. They make a note of something when they come across it, but if it doesn't even appear as a passing remark in the conclusion section, that shows you exactly how important a problem aris or OW thinks it is...

When it comes to the RMA, be forthcoming and provide only as much info as is necessary to support your case or instill a sense of trust in the other party. Don't try and do their job for them trying to brainstorm ideas - that's what they're paid to do. All you're doing is putting ideas in their heads that they can use as excuses to tell you "sorry, that's not covered by our policy", and possibly pissing them off as a customer that won't stop trying to do their job for them.

I think you read the new Connect 750 review, the one has a whole power backplane connected to it (and even then, inrush was nothing more than a passing remark). The PX 750 review doesn't mention inrush current as a problem. And in the PX review, this should tell you everything about how aris tests things:

Code:
However, since all of our tests allow us to be extra picky, we did spot a couple of areas where there is room for improvement.

RMA the EVGA. If it doesn't succeed for some odd reason, look at the Seasonic.
Well every little detail matters in helping the user pick the right psu for them to me. I know that with any psu
you are always going to have some drawbacks with some advantages. But when a psu fails a important
stress test or a con is mentioned on the front page as a drawback, it's something to consider upon picking
that psu I would think. That is, if the reader has some knowledge and good understanding on how the psu gets
reviewed. So you are saying that a inrush current on the 230VAC of 60 doesn't matter? This was reported on
the Seasonic focus Platinum PX 750 actually.

I know. I guess I sent in a silly question like that to evga customer support earlier when I still thought
the psu failure was a user error. Now I believe it was not. (for the most part) But thanks for the wise
advice.

I already have a fairly good understanding of how Aris does the tests, but I meant that I read on
another tech review site that you don't want anything past 50V for inrush currents. Even in the
PX review Aris mentions the 230VAC inrush current being quite high! Sounds like a concern to me.
Corsair rmx 750 gold is mentioned for having better quality caps to contain a lower controlled
inrush current, yet he still mentions an alarming 900 something watt increase before OCP kicks
in because of how high the 12V and 5Vb5 rails are set. Also not a concern? I'm not sure.
Maybe I should go back and read more on how Aris tests the psus.

I would certainly love to pick up the Seasonic focus PX 750, it has been on my mind since
I first started researching psu's, but the bad Amazon reviews scared me away. So you are
saying that I did my research right and that the Seasonic focus PX 750 would be a great
choice for a mid range gaming setup? Here are my specs again..

Asus tuf gaming wifi plus motherboard
Ryzen 7 3700x
Crucial ballistix elite 16 gig x1 ddr4 3200 cl16
Samsung 970 evo plus 250 gig m.2 2280 nvme ssd
Gigabtye Radoen RX 5700 xt 8 g OC
Lian Li Lancool II-W atx mid-tower
Evga P2 750 watt 80+ platinum atx psu
Asus tuf gaming 1440p VG27AQ 165 Hz Monitor

I like that the focus PX has a quieter fan than the FX focus but on
the stress tests, I noticed that the focus PX only meant with one out of three of
it's rated Platinum efficiency tests, whereas the FX focus gold did better on
it's efficiency tests. Almost making the Focus gold sound more promising but I love
the high rated overall Platinum performance results with the PX focus, gaining 1st
place in several test areas of it's watt class. Is 16.3 good ripple for a platinum line
psu though? I already love this psu and I don't even own it yet.

I'm a little worried about buying a psu from Amazon though because a lot of reviewers on
pretty much every single electronic product, no matter what it is have crazy reports
of them being sent the wrong part, a used product when it was listed as new, tampered
with or DOA products, damaged product packages and so on. That's why I made the
attempt to go to Microcenter to get all of my computer parts to build my gaming pc,
except for the psu, which I had shipped to me from ebay. I was worried the whole time
that something would happen to the psu because I didn't get it at a electronics store, and
well..you know what happened afterwards. Just my luck. Anyway, this time since I can't
get a ride back to Microcenter and I don't like Best buy, I'm considering taking a big
leap of faith and getting my psu from Amazon, including the 4 year protection plan,
bringing my new psu to a whopping 180 usd! deep breathe..
 
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Yeah every little detail matters......but are you going to pretend you know better than some of the most veteran reviewers out there? If they don't mention it as being a problem in the conclusion of the review, it's not because they've forgotten the results exist.

The PX 750 review doesn't feature anything about inrush current except on the page about inrush current.

A PSU reviewer expresses that he would like to see a bit of improvement in a certain area because if he wasn't in pursuit of perfection, he wouldn't be respected as a PSU reviewer. Good OEMs like Seasonic take this feedback seriously and want to know what they can do better.

"Could improve" from a PSU reviewer isn't "oh man this could blow up my PC"

It's the same shit with everything else these days. A certain overclocker or reviewer puts out data or results that laymen would never even begin to comprehend, and expresses slight dissatisfaction with one detail; all of a sudden every tom dick and harry becomes a PSU expert and starts boycotting the product.

You could just as easily say that your experience with EVGA has been highly negative, and warn others on Amazon to stay away from the P2 750. By all professional indications, the P2 is a solid PSU. That should tell you something about Amazon reviews.

What's up with the protection plan? These PSUs all have decent warranties. Is it so that you don't ever have to wait on an RMA or something?



On the topic of the inrush being "high", my SGX-650 is allegedly only 3-4A lower on 230A (and worse than the PX on 115), yet he doesn't say anything aside from "inrush low"...if he's not bringing it up explicitly in strong terms in the conclusion, just stop worrying yourself sick about it, the worst offenders are close to 100A and they're still not danger territory
 
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Operandi

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I love Aris's psu reviews! They have been very helpful in determining which psu I should go with. Also the
psu I already got from reading Oklahomawolf's great reviews was probably one of the best mid range psu's
I could of ever hoped to acquire. Too bad it died so soon. Maybe that's why it was being sold from a ebay
auction? Could of fooled me though, it looked very brand new to me inside the box. Now that you mention AVR.
I'm reminded that I had the psu plugged into the surge plus battery outlet on my ups, which includes AVR
protection. Well the psu already had AVR protection, as part of it's power protection suit. Could this be what
caused my psu to die a miserable brutal death? So I shouldn't even worry about protecting my higher end
psu like perhaps the Seasonic focus PX 750 with even a surge protection power strip? I should just plug it
right into the wall? Okay, I will do that, about the evga rma claim. You're right! Why be fully honest with
a faulty psu with a ten year warranty!? I'm so new to all of this type of stuff.

One more question, should I be concerned about a higher than 50V inrush current coming from the
230VAC? I read here that anything pass 50 is a big concern. I don't want my new Seasonic PX popping
on me at start up and taking out my cpu or motherboard with it in a blazing fire!

Oh okay you meant plug in a lamp into my ups since they draw a lot of power I guess and see
if it trips the ups again. Hmm, I could try that later but I'll have to see if I have a good lamp
to test it with.
AVR is the term I was trying to think of for the UPS. Thats what the UPS will use to bring the voltage from the AC mains either up for down to 120 which is what NA standard is. Your PSU dosn't have AVR; it has APFC (active power factor correction) so it will most likely run on anything from 90-240 volts. None of of this really mattes though and you are really over thinking things; the PSU you had should work fine together, you just had bad luck.

In regards to the lamp on the UPS. Its not about putting a high load on it as I doubt you have a 600 watt lamp to hook up to, the idea is just to test and make sure the backup section of the UPS isn't damaged from the PSU shorting out. You say you are using the UPS now but unless you cut the AC from it and let it turn on the battery output you don't really know what kind of condtion its in.
 

ArkJinx7

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Oh okay, so AVR isn't part of the power current protection suit of the psu? I was thinking of APFC. It's like I
just cursed myself from worrying about things going wrong too much. I put so much thought and care into
building my gaming pc. But I can't account for everything that may go wrong. People say that I overthink
things and worry too much but having bad luck just makes me worry more. On the positive side, it has been really
fun learning so much on psu's in the last few day's. 600 watt lamp, haha! Can you imagine? Yes, you are right, I
need to know if my ups is still in full working order. I'll be testing its battery function soon. Okay so aside from
inrush current concerns, do you think that 16.3 is good ripple for a platinum line 750 watt psu? As I understand it,
low ripple is very important towards the longevity of the psu. Gold psu's like the Corsair rmx only have 10! For the
most part, I'm loving the test results of the PX focus 750!

Yeah every little detail matters......but are you going to pretend you know better than some of the most veteran reviewers out there? If they don't mention it as being a problem in the conclusion of the review, it's not because they've forgotten the results exist.

The PX 750 review doesn't feature anything about inrush current except on the page about inrush current.

A PSU reviewer expresses that he would like to see a bit of improvement in a certain area because if he wasn't in pursuit of perfection, he wouldn't be respected as a PSU reviewer. Good OEMs like Seasonic take this feedback seriously and want to know what they can do better.

"Could improve" from a PSU reviewer isn't "oh man this could blow up my PC"

It's the same shit with everything else these days. A certain overclocker or reviewer puts out data or results that laymen would never even begin to comprehend, and expresses slight dissatisfaction with one detail; all of a sudden every tom dick and harry becomes a PSU expert and starts boycotting the product.

You could just as easily say that your experience with EVGA has been highly negative, and warn others on Amazon to stay away from the P2 750. By all professional indications, the P2 is a solid PSU. That should tell you something about Amazon reviews.

What's up with the protection plan? These PSUs all have decent warranties. Is it so that you don't ever have to wait on an RMA or something?



On the topic of the inrush being "high", my SGX-650 is allegedly only 3-4A lower on 230A (and worse than the PX on 115), yet he doesn't say anything aside from "inrush low"...if he's not bringing it up explicitly in strong terms in the conclusion, just stop worrying yourself sick about it, the worst offenders are close to 100A and they're still not danger territory
Not by any chance! Sorry if I sounded like I know better on psu's. I'm just here to learn. Oh yeah, the P2 is top of the line!
That's why I got it for my gaming build! It matches very closely with the corsair rmx and Seasonic PX line specs! OW nearly
gave it a perfect rating! I know that I can trust Amazon reviews more so from actual pc builders and professionals that make a living
building pc's and not so much from trial and error basic pc users that may not know what they are doing. Could you say that is a fair
assessment? But I know what you are saying, when reading your average negative Amazon review, take what is said with a grain
of salt. Its just..why do they have to put the worse reviews on the top of the page? The protection plan covers a full replacement,
repair and 24/h tech support, no questions asked, even if you murder your own psu on accident. Whereas a standard warranty only
covers the usual defective proven product, not harmed by its user, so limited as evga puts it indeed.

Wow, I had no idea that 100 is the real offenders for high inrush currents! I thought that 80 was bad! Is it possible that the higher
the inrush current, the more power could be sent to possibly damage your pc hardware if the OCP failed to kick in because of
being faulty or being set too high? I do get that OCP gets set higher for better hold up times, which is important as well.
I just want to get my Seasonic PX 750 and have a great gaming experience without having to worry about losing my whole setup.
My brother thought that I should just get a bronze rated evga or corsair and call it a day and not overthink it, but the bronze rated
evga's are really bad on ripple and main corsair gold I was considering doesn't even have a fan tester, which was mentioned in
conclusion of the review possibly causing the caps to melt from the psu being placed upside down, which is how the psu
is usually recommended to be placed in the pc case. (if there is a vent on the bottom, which my case has.) That's how I
had my evga P2 psu placed in my case.

In my massive research of psus in the last couple of day's, it has waved on me on how much things can go wrong with their
operation and at this point, I don't really trust any of them. It seems like whenever you buy a prebuilt OEM pc, the psu lasts
forever, well at least with my experience with Dell. But I will try to calm down, close my eyes and just pick a good one
and bite the bullet. Thanks for the advice! I really needed it!
 
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Its just..why do they have to put the worse reviews on the top of the page? The protection plan covers a full replacement,
repair and 24/h tech support, no questions asked, even if you murder your own psu on accident. Whereas a standard warranty only
covers the usual defective proven product, not harmed by its user, so limited as evga puts it indeed.

Wow, I had no idea that 100 is the real offenders for high inrush currents! I thought that 80 was bad! Is it possible that the higher
the inrush current, the more power could be sent to possibly damage your pc hardware if the OCP failed to kick in because of
being faulty or being set too high? I do get that OCP gets set higher for better hold up times, which is important as well.
I just want to get my Seasonic PX 750 and have a great gaming experience without having to worry about losing my whole setup.
My brother thought that I should just get a bronze rated evga or corsair and call it a day and not overthink it, but the bronze rated
evga's are really bad on ripple and main corsair gold I was considering doesn't even have a fan tester, which was mentioned in
conclusion of the review possibly causing the caps to melt from the psu being placed upside down, which is how the psu
is usually recommended to be placed in the pc case. (if there is a vent on the bottom, which my case has.) That's how I
had my evga P2 psu placed in my case.

In my massive research of psus in the last couple of day's, it has waved on me on how much things can go wrong with their
operation and at this point, I don't really trust any of them. It seems like whenever you buy a prebuilt OEM pc, the psu lasts
forever, well at least with my experience with Dell. But I will try to calm down, close my eyes and just pick a good one
and bite the bullet. Thanks for the advice! I really needed it!

Heh, no idea, you'd have to ask Amazon. Doesn't help that Amazon promotes "frequent reviewers" who usually are talking out of their ass.

I think you're confusing current into the PSU and current out of the PSU. Inrush current generally seems to be more a problem for the breaker in your house (if it's too sensitive and trips all the time). It's not what comes out the other end. But with 50-60A inrush max I wouldn't sweat it honestly. For the health of your actual hardware you'd be looking more at volt regulation, transient and ripple.

Wasn't my intention to belittle you. Just trying to make a point that these reviewers have seen a lot over the years so if they see fit to overlook a minor flaw, probably makes sense to trust their judgment unless there are major concerns regarding their objectivity.

I'm prone to streaks of extremely bad luck and constantly overthinking things. At some point you just have to calm down, accept that some things are out of your controls, accept that shit happens to the best of us and the best of products, and trust the professionals. Worst comes to worst, make use of the warranty service. Hell, it could be worse. You could be behind the wheel of a F-150 with a knocking and oil burning motor, death wobble, and a shuddering trans, with no recourse under warranty. :laugh:

Dell PSUs can be pretty good because they like using Delta as an OEM (iirc). They can just be a little low on rated wattage, especially on the 12V rail. HP, on the other hand...
 

ArkJinx7

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Heh, no idea, you'd have to ask Amazon. Doesn't help that Amazon promotes "frequent reviewers" who usually are talking out of their ass.

I think you're confusing current into the PSU and current out of the PSU. Inrush current generally seems to be more a problem for the breaker in your house (if it's too sensitive and trips all the time). But with 50-60A inrush max I wouldn't sweat it honestly. For the health of your actual hardware you'd be looking more at volt regulation, transient and ripple.

Wasn't my intention to belittle you. Just trying to make a point that these reviewers have seen a lot over the years so if they see fit to overlook a minor flaw, probably makes sense to trust their judgment unless there are major concerns regarding their objectivity.

I'm prone to streaks of extremely bad luck and constantly overthinking things. At some point you just have to calm down, accept that some things are out of your controls, accept that shit happens to the best of us and the best of products, and trust the professionals. Worst comes to worst, make use of the warranty service. Hell, it could be worse. You could be behind the wheel of a F-150 with a knocking and oil burning motor, death wobble, and a shuddering trans, with no recourse under warranty. :laugh:

Dell PSUs can be pretty good because they like using Delta as an OEM (iirc). They can just be a little low on rated wattage, especially on the 12V rail.
Okay, thank you so much! I will mainly be focusing on volt regulation, transient and ripple then! My main concern is to
protect my gaming hardware. There is a minor issue with transient on the 3.3v minor rail, should I be concerned? Listed as a major
con to the Seasonic focus PX 750. Well the 3.3V rail is just listed as average response. Or are the minor rails not as concerning
in transient response as the main 12v and 5V5b rails are? Also, what is your take on in-cable capacitors? A lot of pros and
users alike hate them, but they help offer better ripple control. And is EMI spikes ever a concern for a psu? For some reason
the PX focus 750 has them in spades.

Thanks! It's just that I've been waiting over a year and a half to use my gaming pc since I finally got my monitor recently and now this
happens and delays me even longer. I'm tired of waiting to game. The one day of gaming I experienced was one of the best
moments of my life. For Dell psu's, that makes sense why they last so long!
 
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Okay, thank you so much! I will mainly be focusing on volt regulation, transient and ripple then! My main concern is to
protect my gaming hardware. There is a minor issue with transient on the 3.3v minor rail, should I be concerned? Listed as a major
con to the Seasonic focus PX 750. Well the 3.3V rail is just listed as average response. Or are the minor rails not as concerning
in transient response as the main 12v and 5V5b rails are? Also, what is your take on in-cable capacitors? A lot of pros and
users alike hate them, but they help offer better ripple control. And is EMI spikes ever a concern for a psu? For some reason
the PX focus 750 has them in spades.

Thanks! It's just that I've been waiting over a year and a half to use my gaming pc since I finally got my monitor recently and now this
happens and delays me even longer. I'm tired of waiting to game. The one day of gaming I experienced was one of the best
moments of my life. For Dell psu's, that makes sense why they last so long!

Transient on the 3.3V I don't think actually affects much. All your major power draw components are coming off other rails.

3.3V nowadays iirc just powers the memory primarily, and the "other shit" category (think additional controllers the vendor wants on the board). Some of the VRM components can be powered by 3.3V depending on component choice (some power vendors will make 2 versions of the same DrMOS for 3.3V and 5V), but I'm pretty sure the 3.3V is just used to start the VRM, not to power the CPU. And transient response is pretty far down the DDR4 list of priorities I think.

I'm not a fan of the in-cable caps because Seasonic's cables are already stiff as hell but I've never run with them anyways because I use Cablemod on both my rigs. It's not a difference that you'll ever be able to notice when using your PC, only a consideration for Seasonic so they can advertise perfect performance, and for reviewers to take points off for not-absolutely-perfect ripple performance. If it was a cheap PSU where they used in-cable caps to band-aid shitty electrical performance I can understand the concern, but Seasonic Focus and PRIME aren't that type of PSU.

EMI seems to be a pet peeve of aris', seems like he has some fancy equipment to measure it. Can't tell you much about it.
 
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