• We've upgraded our forums. Please post any issues/requests in this thread.

RAID Arrays Explained

Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#1
I have compiled a list of RAID arrays so that people are more aware of what each one does and if it would be useful for them. I will provide advantages and disadvantages of each RAID array given. First, a brief history about RAID.

History of RAID: The idea of RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive [or independent] Disks) was designed as a fix to a problem of bestowing a high capacity storage combined with data availability and redundancy. In the past when hard drives capacities were limited and higher capacity drives were expensive, RAID offered little data protection and redundancy. Compounding the problem, CPU processor performance was increasing at an exponential rate, while disk subsystems were quickly falling behind and creating a bottleneck for server performance.

Back in 1988, a few researchers from the University of California-Berkeley came up with a set of guidelines for the original implementation of RAID. These guidelines would be referred to as RAID-1 through RAID-6. The various RAID levels do NOT mean that RAID 6 would be better than say RAID-1 or RAID-5. Your needs will determine what RAID level is best for your current situation.

Now, when using RAID, it’s recommended to use the same size drives. You can in fact, use various size drives in any given array, but the array will take the form of the smallest hard drive and the rest of the unallocated space on the larger hard drive will not be use and in fact just be a waste. For example, if you wanted to setup a RAID-0 array, it's recommended to have a minimum of two drives of the same size such as 2x80GB. Whenever using any RAID array, the array will combine the number of drives you are using and make it one entire drive. So if you were to RAID-0 2x80GB hard drives, this would make a 160GB hdd. (Will be less when you factor in the formatting)

RAID-0 - Data Striping w/out parity– 2 disk minimum:
Provides improved performance to that of a single, non-RAID-0 drive, and provides additional storage space to work with. This RAID array breaks down the information stored on the hard drive into blocks which are stored on each corresponding RAID-0 hard drive.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives

Advantages: This particular array is the easiest to implement, cheapest to implement, and most all controllers will support the use of RAID-0. Can make boot times quicker and make applications load faster.

Disadvantages: Not fault tolerant. In other words if one drive fails, all data is lost.

Recommendation: Do not use it in an environment where data is of the utmost importance such as a law firm or school corporation. If you implement this array, it is HIGHLY recommended that you schedule daily or weekly backup. (Preferably every couple of days or whenever you add new data) I would not use more than four drives either because you run the risk of losing data. One is better off to install RAID-0 in an environment that where applications require a high amount of performance such as gaming or working with digital imaging. Backup is required so that way if one (or all) drives fail, you can recover from the failure.

RAID-1 – Mirroring & Duplexing – 2 disk minimum without parity:
Set of two disks or more that more or less mirror one another. Meaning the data being written to the primary disk it is being duplicated on the secondary disk (or all other disks in the array). Data is written to all disks at the same time and can be read from each disk separately. Thus enhancing read time. The transfer rate per written block is equal to that of a single disk. If the primary disk in the array fails, the array can be configured to use the mirrored copy on one of the other disks in the array until you can replace the failed hard drive. After which, the data can be restored into the new drive from the other remaining drives in the array. This is NOT a substitute for backups.

Array size: takes the size of the smallest drive.

Advantages: 100% redundant. In other words if a single drive is lost to a failure, you will not lose data. RAID-1 can withstand multiple drive failures. RAID-1 is another simple array setup to implement.

Disadvantages: One of the lease efficient RAID arrays.

Recommendation: Best used in an environment that requires high read performance such as accounting, company payroll, or financial situations. You are still highly recommended to backup your data.

RAID-2 – Hamming Code ECC – 1 or more disks:
This RAID array performs disk striping at the bit level. The error-checking and correction can only be supported with a certain kind of hard drive. When a hard drive read occurs, the data on the drive is checked with the ECC codes to establish that everything is correct. If it happens to be incorrect, the data is corrected on the “fly”.

Array size: Varies

Advantages: Fault tolerant, “on the fly” data correction, high data transfers, simpler RAID design compared to RAID-3, 4, and 5.

Disadvantages: Not commercially available, high entry level cost, and it requires a high transfer rate.

Recommendation: Best left for business purposes.

RAID-3 – Parallel Transfer (Striping) with Parity – 3 disk minimum:
Data is divided amongst and written to the separate hard drives. The parity is generally made on writes, written to the parity drive, and checked on the read. If a disk happens to fail, then the data is restored across the striped array using the parity information that was written to one of the other hard drives. The performance of the disk reads in RAID-3 is that of a RAID-0 implementation. If you add more drives to increase the total size of the RAID-3 array, then the parity size of the drive must also be increased so that it can match or surpass the physical size of the individual array drives.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 1

Advantages: Fault tolerant, high read and write of data transfer, disk failure has an exiguous amount of impact, and has a high efficiency.

Disadvantages: Difficult and resource intensive if used in software RAID, complex, and the transaction rate is equal to a single hard drive (so long as the spindles are in sync)

Recommendation: Video production and or live streaming, Editing of Image and Video and any other application requiring high throughput/best for applications that require sequential data reads.

RAID-4 – Independent Data Disks w/ Shared Parity – 3 disk minimum:
It is similar to RAID-3 in that it contains a number of striped disks and it has a separate parity disk. However, the size of the striping block is bigger to reconcile more data. This is what makes RAID-4 similar to RAID-3 in that it has basically the same implementation, but it removes the bottlenecks that affected the transactional data in RAID-3.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives – 1

Advantages: High read rate, high aggregate read, Low parity (high efficiency)

Disadvantages: The worst write rate, worst write aggregate rate, difficult to rebuild in the event of a hard drive failure, block read rate is that of a single disk, not commercially available

Recommendation: Not a recommended use. There are better options to choose from.

RAID-5 – Striping with Parity – 3 disk minimum:
This is the most widely used RAID array used today. What RAID-5 does is the parity information gets distributed amongst all drives within the array unlike RAID-3 or 4. A certain amount of total disk space becomes unavailable on the array so that the parity data can be written to disk. Usually, the amount of drive space given for parity information is equal to the size of one entire drive in the array. Example, an array of 4x10GB drives would give you approximately 30GB of space for your data while the left over 10GB would be reserved for the parity information.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 1

Advantages: Fault tolerant, read speeds are quite high, high efficiency, good transfer rate

Disadvantages: Disk failure has a medium impact on the array (meaning you can only sustain one drive failure at a given time), has the most complex design, difficult to rebuild after a disk failure

Recommendation: File servers, database servers, Web servers, Email servers, Intranet servers, etc.

RAID-6 – Striping with Double Parity – 4 disk minimum plus a proprietary RAID controller:
RAID-6 is the exact same thing as RAID-5, but it offers double the parity of RAID-5 so that way you can sustain a two disk failure and still retain your data.

Array size: Size of Smallest Drive x Number of Drives - 2

Advantages: Fault tolerant, can sustain a two disk failure, perfect for a mission critical environment

Disadvantages: More complex, controller overhead for the parity is very high,

Recommendation: File servers, database servers, Web servers, Email servers, Intranet servers, etc.

Please note that neither RAID array is a preventative from doing regular backups. Backups are still highly recommended in case of an unforeseeable event.
 

d44ve

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2007
Messages
2,520 (0.65/day)
Likes
299
Processor Intel E6600 @ 4.2GHZ Wo0t!
Motherboard ASUS Striker Extreme & eVGA 680i A1
Cooling Phase Change !!
Memory OCZ SLI 1066MHZ (2GB)
Video Card(s) EVGA 8800 GTX
Storage Western Digital 320 GB
Case Antec 900
Power Supply Lian-Li V2000
Software Vista Ultimate
#2

Hawk1

New Member
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
1,248 (0.32/day)
Likes
161
Location
The Big Smoke, Canada
Processor E6600@3.6Ghz (8x450)
Motherboard Commando
Cooling TRUE
Memory 2GB Ballistix Tracers @900 4-4-4-12
Video Card(s) ATI X1950XTX w/TR HR-03
Storage 2 x WD250GB (RAID0) 1x WD150GB Raptor 1x500GB external
Display(s) Dell 24" Ultrasharp
Case TT Armour
Audio Device(s) Xfi xtreme Gamer (X-230s/HD595s)
Power Supply TT 750W modular
Software xp pro SP2/Vista Ultimate 32
#3
Very nice write up. Now you just need to add raid 10 (I think thats the last one). Anyway, I think this is stickyable.

Edit: lol D44ve, I was about to tell you that when you deleted/edited your post. But nice quick catch.
 

d44ve

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2007
Messages
2,520 (0.65/day)
Likes
299
Processor Intel E6600 @ 4.2GHZ Wo0t!
Motherboard ASUS Striker Extreme & eVGA 680i A1
Cooling Phase Change !!
Memory OCZ SLI 1066MHZ (2GB)
Video Card(s) EVGA 8800 GTX
Storage Western Digital 320 GB
Case Antec 900
Power Supply Lian-Li V2000
Software Vista Ultimate
#4
RAID 10? :wtf:
 

Hawk1

New Member
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
1,248 (0.32/day)
Likes
161
Location
The Big Smoke, Canada
Processor E6600@3.6Ghz (8x450)
Motherboard Commando
Cooling TRUE
Memory 2GB Ballistix Tracers @900 4-4-4-12
Video Card(s) ATI X1950XTX w/TR HR-03
Storage 2 x WD250GB (RAID0) 1x WD150GB Raptor 1x500GB external
Display(s) Dell 24" Ultrasharp
Case TT Armour
Audio Device(s) Xfi xtreme Gamer (X-230s/HD595s)
Power Supply TT 750W modular
Software xp pro SP2/Vista Ultimate 32
#5
Joined
Aug 10, 2006
Messages
4,413 (1.07/day)
Likes
147
Location
England
Processor Intel Core i7-7700K
Motherboard ASUS ROG Strix Z270E Gaming
Cooling Arctic Cooling Freezer i11
Memory 4x 8GB DDR4 Corsair Vengeance LPX @ 2133MHz
Video Card(s) 2x NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti FEs
Storage 512GB SSD, 2x2TB HDD
Display(s) AOC U2879VF, AOC G2260VWQ6
Case Corsair 750D Airflow Edition
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 850G
Software Windows 10 x64 Pro
#6
That's RAID 1+0...
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2007
Messages
4,058 (1.07/day)
Likes
1,122
Location
Geneva, FL, USA
Processor Intel i5-6600
Motherboard ASRock H170M-ITX
Cooling Cooler Master Geminii S524
Memory G.Skill DDR4-2133 16GB (8GB x 2)
Video Card(s) Gigabyte R9-380X 4GB
Storage Samsung 950 EVO 250GB (mSATA)
Display(s) LG 29UM69G-B 2560x1080 IPS
Case Lian Li PC-Q25
Audio Device(s) Realtek ALC892
Power Supply Seasonic SS-460FL2
Mouse Logitech G700s
Keyboard Logitech G110
Software Windows 10 Pro
#7
Nested arrays.

RAID-10 is a RAID-0 of RAID-1 arrays.

RAID-01 is a RAID-1 of RAID-0 arrays.

You can find RAID-51, 50, and some others on certain controllers.
 

d44ve

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2007
Messages
2,520 (0.65/day)
Likes
299
Processor Intel E6600 @ 4.2GHZ Wo0t!
Motherboard ASUS Striker Extreme & eVGA 680i A1
Cooling Phase Change !!
Memory OCZ SLI 1066MHZ (2GB)
Video Card(s) EVGA 8800 GTX
Storage Western Digital 320 GB
Case Antec 900
Power Supply Lian-Li V2000
Software Vista Ultimate
#8
I gotcha.... I have always just called it 1+0 or 0+1 or whatever way you want to go
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2007
Messages
4,058 (1.07/day)
Likes
1,122
Location
Geneva, FL, USA
Processor Intel i5-6600
Motherboard ASRock H170M-ITX
Cooling Cooler Master Geminii S524
Memory G.Skill DDR4-2133 16GB (8GB x 2)
Video Card(s) Gigabyte R9-380X 4GB
Storage Samsung 950 EVO 250GB (mSATA)
Display(s) LG 29UM69G-B 2560x1080 IPS
Case Lian Li PC-Q25
Audio Device(s) Realtek ALC892
Power Supply Seasonic SS-460FL2
Mouse Logitech G700s
Keyboard Logitech G110
Software Windows 10 Pro
#9
Luckily we're only up to RAID-7 (AFAIK), so we can do 8 and 9 before having to change the terminology :D
 

DanTheBanjoman

Señor Moderator
Joined
May 20, 2004
Messages
10,488 (2.12/day)
Likes
1,331
#10
Really, check your info on RAID2, it's obsolete, there is no use for it. It's advantage is builtin in every modern disk nowadays. It is not a simple array either, it requires a mad amount of disks for no apparent reason.
 

Mediocre

New Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2006
Messages
1,237 (0.29/day)
Likes
70
Processor C2D E8400 @ 3.60GHz
Motherboard ASUS P5Q-Pro w/ extra Vreg HS
Cooling Apogee GTX, 2x120mm DD, MCP-1000P Res/Pump, all 3/8" 7x80mm (4x push/pull, 2x exhaust, 1x side)
Memory 2 x 1GB Corsair Dominator DDR2 1066 @ 800 (4-3-3-6)
Video Card(s) EVGA 9800GTX+
Storage 3 x 80 GB WD SATA300 (2x RAID 0)
Display(s) Scepter x37 1080p 37" LCD & Samsung 204B
Case CoolerMaster HAF932
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply Mushkin HP-580AP (C/O TPU!)
Software Vista Ultimate (32-bit)
#11
Or you could say thanks for the great information and contribution to the forums...here's some additional info...

Thanks for the compilation...did you add it to the wiki??

:toast:
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#12
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#13
Really, check your info on RAID2, it's obsolete, there is no use for it. It's advantage is builtin in every modern disk nowadays. It is not a simple array either, it requires a mad amount of disks for no apparent reason.
I know its an obsolete array, but I figured I would throw it in anyway.
 

Mediocre

New Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2006
Messages
1,237 (0.29/day)
Likes
70
Processor C2D E8400 @ 3.60GHz
Motherboard ASUS P5Q-Pro w/ extra Vreg HS
Cooling Apogee GTX, 2x120mm DD, MCP-1000P Res/Pump, all 3/8" 7x80mm (4x push/pull, 2x exhaust, 1x side)
Memory 2 x 1GB Corsair Dominator DDR2 1066 @ 800 (4-3-3-6)
Video Card(s) EVGA 9800GTX+
Storage 3 x 80 GB WD SATA300 (2x RAID 0)
Display(s) Scepter x37 1080p 37" LCD & Samsung 204B
Case CoolerMaster HAF932
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply Mushkin HP-580AP (C/O TPU!)
Software Vista Ultimate (32-bit)
#14
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#15

Mediocre

New Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2006
Messages
1,237 (0.29/day)
Likes
70
Processor C2D E8400 @ 3.60GHz
Motherboard ASUS P5Q-Pro w/ extra Vreg HS
Cooling Apogee GTX, 2x120mm DD, MCP-1000P Res/Pump, all 3/8" 7x80mm (4x push/pull, 2x exhaust, 1x side)
Memory 2 x 1GB Corsair Dominator DDR2 1066 @ 800 (4-3-3-6)
Video Card(s) EVGA 9800GTX+
Storage 3 x 80 GB WD SATA300 (2x RAID 0)
Display(s) Scepter x37 1080p 37" LCD & Samsung 204B
Case CoolerMaster HAF932
Audio Device(s) Onboard
Power Supply Mushkin HP-580AP (C/O TPU!)
Software Vista Ultimate (32-bit)
#16
I SWEAR that wasn't in there 2 minutes ago :wtf:

Oh well, I suppose editing (and not creating from scratch) maybe more work than its worth

Ahh well, thanks anyway
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#17
I SWEAR that wasn't in there 2 minutes ago :wtf:

Oh well, I suppose editing (and not creating from scratch) maybe more work than its worth

Ahh well, thanks anyway
:laugh: No problem.
 
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
457 (0.12/day)
Likes
11
Location
Irvine, CA
System Name My3yrOldBaby
Processor Intel C2Q Q6600 G0 2.4GHz (3.6 Ghz @ 1.400V)
Motherboard eVGA 790 FTW (Analogue) 132-YW-E179-A1
Cooling Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme (Push+Pull: Silverstone 120mm)
Memory 8GB G.Skill DDR3 2x4GB 1866 (running 1600) + 2GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3 1x2GB 1333 (running 1600)
Video Card(s) eVGA 8800GTX 768MB
Storage (2) WD Raptor 150GB SATA [RAID 0], (4) Seagate Barracuda 320GB SATA [RAID 0+1]
Display(s) Acer 20" - AL2017, Acer 22"W - AL2216WBD
Case Thermaltake Armor w/ 25cm Fan & Extra Front iCage
Audio Device(s) OnBoard
Power Supply Silverstone 1000W - ST1000
Software Windows XP Pro x64
#18
Very Nice

VERY nice bro. This should DEFINITELY be stickied. You responded to my suggestion damn fast, good reaction time :cool:
I do feel slightly proud in that at least I suggested the idea haha. But mad props for following through so thoroughly.

Now whenever a thread starts or ends up on RAID, we just point them here. Sweet.

Oh, and I still think someone should do a comprehensive benchmark read/write test of 5 Identical HDDs in every configuration of RAID possible, with both onboard and PCI Raid Controllers, to have an absolute performance comparison, instead of so many opinions and scattered recommendations on which RAID array to use. Of course then apply a fault tolerance bullet to each benchmark. That would make TPU a hotspot for sure... you know how many search results you get asking "Which RAID array do I use!?" haha, including myself.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#21
VERY nice bro. This should DEFINITELY be stickied. You responded to my suggestion damn fast, good reaction time :cool:
I do feel slightly proud in that at least I suggested the idea haha. But mad props for following through so thoroughly.

Now whenever a thread starts or ends up on RAID, we just point them here. Sweet.

Oh, and I still think someone should do a comprehensive benchmark read/write test of 5 Identical HDDs in every configuration of RAID possible, with both onboard and PCI Raid Controllers, to have an absolute performance comparison, instead of so many opinions and scattered recommendations on which RAID array to use. Of course then apply a fault tolerance bullet to each benchmark. That would make TPU a hotspot for sure... you know how many search results you get asking "Which RAID array do I use!?" haha, including myself.
Thanks. I appreciate it all the feedback.

If I could I would do the benchmarks for the hard drives, but I dont have enough spare hard drives to do that.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#22
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
6,201 (1.67/day)
Likes
982
System Name Phantom Skylake
Processor Intel i5 6600k @ 4.5GHZ w/ Corsair H80i CPU AiO w/Corsair 120mm SP120 RBG fan
Motherboard Asus z170-A
Cooling 4x120mm Corsair SP120 RBG fans
Memory G.skill DDR4 3200MHz 2x4GB (Soon to be Corsair Vengeance RBG)
Video Card(s) Asus DirectCUII GTX 980 STRIX
Storage Samsung 960 EVO m.2, Samsung 850 EVO 1TB SSD, 2TB backup, 16TB Synology DS1515+ RAID-5
Display(s) Acer Predator 34" 3440x1440
Case Corsair 570x RBG Tempered Glass
Audio Device(s) Onboard / Corsair Void Wireless RGB
Power Supply Corsair HX750w Professional Series
Mouse Logitech G602s
Keyboard Corsair K70 Rapidfire
Software Windows 10 x64 Professional
Benchmark Scores Coming Soon
#23
Bump from the 1yr 1w and 2d grave.

Sticky?
 

AsRock

TPU addict
Joined
Jun 23, 2007
Messages
15,309 (4.00/day)
Likes
4,717
Location
US
Processor 2500k \ 3770k
Motherboard ASRock Z68 \ Z77
Memory Samsung low profile 1600
Video Card(s) XFX 6770 \ XFX R9 290X
Storage Intel 80Gb (SATA2) WD 250Gb \ Team SSD+Samsung Evo 250Gb+500Gb+ 2xCorsair Force+WD250GbHDD
Display(s) Samsung 1080P \ Toshiba HDTV 1080P
Case HTPC400 \ Thermaltake Armor case ( original ), With Zalman fan controller ( wattage usage ).
Audio Device(s) Yamaha RX-V475 \ Marantz SR5008 Tannoy Mercury MKII Paradigm 5SE + Tannoy Mercury F4
Power Supply PC&Power 750w \ Seasonic 750w MKII
Mouse MS intelimouse \ Logitech G700s + Steelseries Sensei wireless
Keyboard Logitech K120 \ ROCCAT MK Pro ( modded amber leds )
Benchmark Scores Meh benchmarks.
#24
I vote for a sticky.
 

newtekie1

Semi-Retired Folder
Joined
Nov 22, 2005
Messages
24,274 (5.51/day)
Likes
10,359
Location
Indiana, USA
Processor Intel Core i7 4790K@4.6GHz
Motherboard AsRock Z97 Extreme6
Cooling Corsair H100i
Memory 32GB Corsair DDR3-1866 9-10-9-27
Video Card(s) ASUS GTX960 STRIX @ 1500/1900
Storage 480GB Crucial MX200 + 2TB Seagate Solid State Hybrid Drive with 128GB OCZ Synapse SSD Cache
Display(s) QNIX QX2710 1440p@120Hz
Case Corsair 650D Black
Audio Device(s) Onboard is good enough for me
Power Supply Corsair HX850
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#25
One advantage of RAID-1 that you missed is that you can usually take a drive from a failed controller and connected it to any other controller and get the data.

Disadvantages of RAID 0 and 5 is that if the controller fails or you want to switch controllers(I.E. swap a motherboard if you are using onboard) then the array usually won't work on the new controller, so the data is lost.