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Why is Intel and AMD IHS nickel plated?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by MiST91, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. MiST91 Guest

    i'm considering lapping my Intel Core2Duo E6300 and i was thinking, why does the Intel and AMD (i think) intergrated heat spreader have a nickel plating on it? would it not be better if it didn't have any nikel on it and just be made of copper?
     
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  2. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi

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    pure copper oxidizes much rapily than nickel
     
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  3. MiST91 Guest

    yeah, never thought of that, i guess thats why heat sinks never seem to come proffesionally mirror lapped, they always seem to look a little faded
     
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  4. DaMulta

    DaMulta My stars went supernova

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    I wish they just would stop using them, but that's a totally different story.
     
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  5. t_ski

    t_ski Former Staff

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    Also, if someone were to use an aluminum heatsink on it, there would be galvanic action between the two. The nickel plating keeps this from happening.
     
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  6. MiST91 Guest

    i can't really understand why there used, i'm pretty sure your going to get better results not using any IHS, just pure contact of the die and heat sink, just like with the old pre-pentium4/Athlon64 processors.

    the Core2Duo IHS cant really be removed can it?
     
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  7. MiST91 Guest

    whats a galvanic action?
     
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  8. Grings

    Grings

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    Agreed, the reason usually given is lame too (that cores are too delicate), as someone who owned many athlon xp's and never cracked a die, as well as changed heatsinks on loads of graphics cards (the g80 is the only one ive owned that DID have a heatspreader) i think its stupid
     
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  9. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi

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  10. MiST91 Guest

    i think thats what i would have done at school if i stayed instead of going to college
     
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  11. MiST91 Guest

    i cracked one CPU die, and that was the first time i removed the heat sink from anything (i was about 12 or somthing) but i learned from my mistake and wont ever do it again.

    I think the reason they are putting IHS on everything is because computer components are now aimed at people who havn't got a clue when it comes to computer systems as well as system builders (makes em' more money) and when some one who doesn't really know what there doing when it comes to upgrading there computer decides they want a a new processor or somthing, they can do it there self without cracking the die, or breaking there motherboard (intel pushpins, rather than clips)
     
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  12. t_ski

    t_ski Former Staff

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    In the old days it didn't matter so much as people weren't swapping out their stock coolers for aftermarket ones. As overclocking became more and more common, Intel and others received more and more RMA CPU's. Someone started noticing small cracks & chips around the corners and the IHS was added to prevent this. It's not about performance, but about the ability to protect their product and avoid returns. That's what any manufacturer does.

    Personally, I have never cracked a CPU core. I had a Thermalright HR-05-SLI on my DFI NF4 Ultra-D that slowly ground down the corners on the NB, but that may have been from swapping out hardware all the time. Still worked great though ;)
     
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  13. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    As changing computer components became more mainstream the companies needed a way to protect the core, the IHS was the solution. Unfortunately, to many inexperienced people started swapping out parts, because it has become so easy to buy a replacement CPU these days, and us experienced enthusiasts have to suffer because of it.
     
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  14. Darknova

    Darknova

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    I've cracked...2 (i think) Athlon XPs, but then the mounting mechanism sucks HARD on socket A. If it was the way the AM2 does it it would be much better and with less chance of cracking the die.
     
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  15. 3991vhtes

    3991vhtes New Member

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    I've pulled the IHS on my P4... no problems! :D

    I nearly cracked the chip while doing it :eek:
     
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  16. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It's because when copper is exposed to air, a layer of gangue (think of it as an oxide layer) is formed. This greatly affects heat transfer. Hence, they add a nickel layer. The nickel layer is sufficiently thin to protect the copper and isn't thick enough to come in the way of efficient transfer. When lapping, you shave off this layer. It's easy to etch on this layer, hence the company markings (model / serial number / blah ^ blah ) is etched onto it.
     
  17. Silverel

    Silverel

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    I've got both socket A and AM2 at home right now, the only difference is the little lever thing. Still seems like the same amount of pressure. I don't use Intel, but their 4 push-pins seems like a better way of doing things. AM2 is an improvement though, as I no longer have to use a screwdriver if I wanted to change CPU's.
     
  18. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    AM2 is a huge improvemnt. Using a cage around the CPU socket, to attach the heatsink to is much better than using the socket itself. Get socket A heatsinks on wasn't really that hard, getting them off was a pain in the ass.
     
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  19. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Porcelain with a aluminum cap, or just porcelain. The olden days.




    I chipped the edges of my nfarce with one of the Thermalright SLI coolers too. Freaked me out. Are the 3800+ X2 soldered or glued?
     
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  20. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Stabbing the motherboard if you slipped.



    Intel push pins are a pain, more trouble than they are worth. I have seen two boards cracked by trying to insert them. And the outer plastic seems to have a memory and after a short while of being in deosn't want to collapse together enough to reinsert easily.
     
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  21. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    I'm not a fan of the push pin design. I don't like the fact that the pressure is generated from bending the motherboard. Thats why all my personal machines use aftermarket coolers with bolt-through designs.

    It is sad the mounting system is so poorly designed, the coolers are actually pretty decent for stock. Well the higher end ones are, the crappy heatsinks they send with the Celerons suck monkey butt.
     
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  22. Darknova

    Darknova

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    I hate the push-pins with a passion, that's why I'm waiting for the bolt-thru kit to come back in stock so I can grab one and replace the push-pins on my Infinity.
     
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  23. Silverel

    Silverel

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    I retract my statement about the push-pins.

    May they burn in hell.
     
  24. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Amen.
     
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  25. mon74

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    K6-2

    I remember owning K6 & K6-2 processors with aluminum IHS along with aluminun heatsinks (no thermal paste whatsoever) and never noticed galvanic corrosion... maybe it needs more heat for it to happen?:ohwell:
     
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