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Cooler Master to Enter the Monitor Market With 30" GM219-30, 35" GM219-35 21:9, FreeSync 2 Monitors

Cooler Master seems to be sticking its tendrils to into another slice of the PC market with the upcoming release of two new monitor products. The company, best known for their cooling solutions, has already branched out into multiple sectors of the PC component and DIY market, and now it seems to want to make a name for itself in the monitor arena as well. Their first entries, the 30" GM219-30 and 35" GM219-35, are 21:9 ratio affairs based on VA technology. Both offer Adaptive Sync, which means "limited" NVIDIA G-Sync support and full AMD FreeSync 2 support. The FreeSync 2 support, of course, also entails a measure of HDR capabilities, since that particular revision of the AMD standard was worked on mostly for that inclusion.

The 30" GM219-30 has a 2560 x 1080 resolution and offers a 200 Hz refresh rate, while the 35" GM219-35 carries a 3440 x 1440 resolution, but brings refresh rates down to a more common 120 Hz. Cooler Master are quoting a 1 ms refresh rate for these monitors. Release is expected for late 2019, with the 30" model being expected to retail for $399.99, while the 35" model will retail for $999.99 USD.

ASUS Rolls Out ROG Swift PG349Q, a 120Hz Curved Ultrawide

ASUS today rolled out the ROG Swift PG349Q, one of the rare few curved ultrawide monitors with a high refresh-rate. This 34-inch display with a 21:9 aspect-ratio and 3440 x 1440 pixels native resolution, ticks at 120 Hz refresh-rate, and supports NVIDIA G-Sync technology. Its IPS panel has a rather obtuse 1900R curvature compared to the more common 1800R, with 178°/178° viewing-angles. Other vital specs include 300 cd/m² maximum brightness, 4 ms (GTG) response time, and 1000:1 static contrast ratio. The monitor offers flicker-free brightness adjustment, by using a non-PWM method to dim the LEDs illuminating the panel. The back side of the monitor and its stand are studded with RGB LEDs, which you control using Aura Sync RGB software. The monitor takes in HDMI and DisplayPort connections, and needs a USB connection to control the lighting. The company didn't reveal pricing.

ASUS Releases ProArt PA34VC Professional Monitor - 21:9, 3440 x 1440 10-bit IPS Panel, HDR 10, 1900R

ASUS today released the latest into their line of ProArt monitors, especially geared for professionals, where color accuracy is paramount. The ProArt PA34VC features a 21:9 aspect ratio over a 3440 x 1440 IPS panel, which guarantees double the widescreen space of conventional 1080p monitors. The panel already comes factory-calibrated, so there's no need to mix things up in post-buy tinkering (though it does support ASUS' ProArt Calibration Technology,

There's HDR 10 VESA certification with 100% sRGB color gamut coverage, dual Thunderbolt 3 ports for video connectivity and data-transfers at speeds of up to 40 Gbps. These Thunderbolt ports also enable Power Delivery of up to 60W to external devices. It also features built-in Picture-in-Picture (PiP) and Picture-by-Picture (PbP). Gray-to-gray response time is being rated at 0.1ms, according to ASUS, while typical brightness caps out at 300 cd/m².

Acer Releases Predator XR343CKP Monitor: 34" IPS, 3440 x 1440, FreeSync, 1 ms

Acer announced the release of another FreeSync monitor to their lineup. The Predator XR343CKP offers a 34", ultrawide, curved IPS panel with a 3440 x 1440 resolution. Being an IPS panel, the 1 ms response time (with MPRT, so, an added blur reduction mode is taken into account for this response time) is a premium specification. It features an up to 100 Hz refresh rate with FreeSync technology enabling variable refreshes without screen tearing.

The panel offers a typical 1,000:1 contrast ratio with a relatively low 350 cd/m² typical brightness, 172/178 viewing angles, 1.07 billion color depth and standard sRGB color gamut. Display Inputs include HDMI, DisplayPort, and 5x USB ports. All of this can be available for the modest amount of $1799... Which isn't at all the number I expected to be quitting based on the specs alone, and looking at other market offerings. But that's what's being shown on Acer's page - though some retailers, such as Amazon Germany, are offering this for some €893 (~$1000), which is much more realistic.

AOC Intros AGON AG352UCG6 35-inch Curved Ultrawide Gaming Monitor

AOC today introduced the AGON AG352UCG6, a 35-inch curved ultrawide gaming monitor. Featuring an 1800R curvature and 21:9 ultrawide aspect-ratio, the monitor offers WideQHD (3440 x 1440 pixels) resolution, with 120 Hz refresh-rate, and support for NVIDIA G-SYNC. Its AMVA panel offers 178°/178° viewing angles. Display inputs include DisplayPort 1.2, and HDMI 1.4. Among its gamer-centric features are genre-specific display presets, headset stand, rear RGB LED diffusers that either work as mood-lighting or whatever you set them to do, a 200-step gray levels saturation setting (think Adobe Photoshop levels control built into your monitor); and a headset mount.

ASUS Intros ROG Strix XG35VQ 21:9, UWQHD Monitor With 100 Hz FreeSync

ASUS has introduced a new ROG Strix monitor to its lineup, the XG35VQ, which brings with it UWQHD resolution (3440 x 1440) in a 21:9 aspect ratio and a 35" diagonal. It's a curved affair - 1800R at that - and ASUS says the VA panel offers 100% sRGB coverage, plus 2500:1 contrast and 300 cd/m2 brightness. Viewing angles stand at an almost perfect 178° - a standard spec in recent times.

The most interesting selling point for this monitor, however, is that it can deliver a 100 Hz refresh rate, with FreeSync support up to that frequency. A 4 ms response time means reduced ghosting, and the panel also applies ASUS' version of Extreme Low Motion Blur mode, which strobes the LED backlight to lower persistence, much like a VR display. This mode uses a fixed refresh rate, so ASUS recommends it for fast-paced games where users can comfortably maintain high frame rates.

AMD's RX Vega Low Key Budapest Event: Vega Pitted Against GTX 1080

On the first stop in AMD's two-continent spanning RX Vega tour (which really only counts with three locations), the company pitted their upcoming RX Vega graphics card (we expect this to be their flagship offering) against NVIDIA's GTX 1080 graphics card. The event itself was pretty subdued, and there was not much to see when it comes to the RX Vega graphics card - literally. Both it and the GTX 1080 were enclosed inside PC towers, with the event-goers not being allowed to even catch a glimpse of the piece of AMD hardware that has most approximated a unicorn in recent times.

The Vega-powered system also made use of a Ryzen 7 processor, and the cards were running Battlefield 1 (or Sniper Elite 4; there's lots of discussion going on about that, but the first image below does show a first-person view) with non-descript monitors, one supporting FreeSync, the other G-Sync. The monitor's models were covered by cloth so that users weren't able to tell which system was running which graphics card, though due to ASUS' partnership in the event, both were (probably) of ASUS make. The resolution used was 3440 x 1440, which should mean over 60 FPS on the GTX 1080 on Ultra. It has been reported by users that attended the event that one of the systems lagged slightly in one portion of the demo, though we can't confirm which one (and I'd say that was AMD's intention.)
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