News Posts matching "MIT"

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Dell Rolls Out the OptiPlex 3020 Desktop

Dell has this week introduced a new OptiPlex business-ready desktop, a model dubbed OptiPlex 3020 that promises to offer 'industry-leading performance and best-in-class security in a budget-friendly package'.

Coming in two versions - Minitower (MIT) and Small Form Factor (SFF), this compact PC features a tool-free design and packs a 4th gen Intel Core processor, up to 16 GB of RAM, Intel HD 4600 graphics, either a hard drive or a solid-state hybrid drive (for up to 2 TB of storage on the minitower SKU), one PCIe x16 slot for graphics expansion, two USB 3.0 ports, and VGA and DisplayPort 1.2 outputs. The OptiPlex 3020 starts at $499.

AMD Appoints Ahmed Yahia Al Idrissi to Board of Directors

AMD (NYSE: AMD) announced today that Ahmed Yahia Al Idrissi has been appointed to the company's board of directors as a second representative of Mubadala Development Company. Yahia currently serves as executive director of Mubadala Industry, where he is responsible for Mubadala's growing industrial portfolio, including metals, mining, utilities, and advanced materials and products. Prior to joining Mubadala, Yahia was a partner at McKinsey & Company where he co-led the firm's Principal Investor practice. He was also the managing partner of McKinsey's Abu Dhabi practice.

"Ahmed's years of success at McKinsey, his responsibilities as part of the senior executive management team at Mubadala and his extensive experience with a number of different boards make him an excellent addition to AMD's board of directors," said Bruce Claflin, AMD's chairman of the board.

Re-engineered Battery Material Could Lead to Rapid Recharging of Many Devices

MIT engineers have created a kind of beltway that allows for the rapid transit of electrical energy through a well-known battery material, an advance that could usher in smaller, lighter batteries -- for cell phones and other devices -- that could recharge in seconds rather than hours. The work could also allow for the quick recharging of batteries in electric cars, although that particular application would be limited by the amount of power available to a homeowner through the electric grid.
The work, led by Gerbrand Ceder, the Richard P. Simmons Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, is reported in the March 12 issue of Nature. Because the material involved is not new -- the researchers have simply changed the way they make it -- Ceder believes the work could make it into the marketplace within two to three years.

NVIDIA Names Stanford's Bill Dally Chief Scientist, VP of Research

NVIDIA Corporation today announced that Bill Dally, the chairman of Stanford University’s computer science department, will join the company as Chief Scientist and Vice President of NVIDIA Research. The company also announced that longtime Chief Scientist David Kirk has been appointed “NVIDIA Fellow.”

“I am thrilled to welcome Bill to NVIDIA at such a pivotal time for our company,” said Jen-Hsun Huang, president and CEO, NVIDIA. “His pioneering work in stream processors at Stanford greatly influenced the work we are doing at NVIDIA today. As one of the world’s founding visionaries in parallel computing, he shares our passion for the GPU’s evolution into a general purpose parallel processor and how it is increasingly becoming the soul of the new PC. His reputation as an innovator in our industry is unrivaled. It is truly an honor to have a legend like Bill in our company.”

Buy a Laptop for a Child, Get Another Laptop Free

One Laptop Per Child, an ambitious project to bring computing to the developing world’s children, has considerable momentum. The early reviews have been glowing, and mass production is set to start next month.

Orders, however, are slow. "I have to some degree underestimated the difference between shaking the hand of a head of state and having a check written," said Nicholas Negroponte, chairman of the nonprofit project. "And yes, it has been a disappointment."

But Mr. Negroponte, the founding director of the M.I.T. Media Laboratory, views the problem as a temporary one in the long-term pursuit of using technology as a new channel of learning and self-expression for children worldwide. He is reaching out to the public to try to give the laptop campaign a boost. The marketing program, to be announced today, is called "Give 1 Get 1," in which Americans and Canadians can buy two laptops for $399. One of the machines will be given to a child in a developing nation, and the other one will be shipped to the purchaser by Christmas. The donated computer is a tax-deductible charitable contribution. The program will run for two weeks, with orders accepted from Nov. 12 to Nov. 26.

MIT Team Simplifies Programming

The group of people who were previously responsible for creating the popular LEGO Mindstorms series of programmable capable robotics kits are responsible for creating Scratch a program which makes it easier for young kids above eight years old to learn programming. Scratch is available as a free 35 MB download, and so far runs on both Windows and Mac OS X. Programming commands are very simple and are separated into categories such as Motion and Sensing and the commands can be dragged and dropped into the scripts panel.
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