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NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Third Quarter Fiscal 2020

NVIDIA today reported revenue for the third quarter ended Oct. 27, 2019, of $3.01 billion compared with $3.18 billion a year earlier and $2.58 billion in the previous quarter. GAAP earnings per diluted share for the quarter were $1.45, compared with $1.97 a year ago and $0.90 in the previous quarter. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share were $1.78, compared with $1.84 a year earlier and $1.24 in the previous quarter.

"Our gaming business and demand from hyperscale customers powered Q3's results," said Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA. "The realism of computer graphics is taking a giant leap forward with NVIDIA RTX. "This quarter, we have laid the foundation for where AI will ultimately make the greatest impact. We extended our reach beyond the cloud, to the edge, where GPU-accelerated 5G, AI and IoT will revolutionize the world's largest industries. We see strong data center growth ahead, driven by the rise of conversational AI and inference."

NVIDIA Responds to Tesla's In-house Full Self-driving Hardware Development

Tesla held an investor panel in the USA yesterday (April 22) with the entire event, focusing on autonomous vehicles, also streamed on YouTube (replay here). There were many things promised in the course of the event, many of which are outside the scope of this website, but the announcement of Tesla's first full self-driving hardware module made the news in more ways than one as reported right here on TechPowerUp. We had noted how Tesla had traditionally relied on NVIDIA (and then Intel) microcontroller units, as well as NVIDIA self-driving modules in the past, but the new in-house built module had stepped away from the green camp in favor of more control over the feature set.

NVIDIA was quick to respond to this, saying Tesla was incorrect in their comparisons, in that the NVIDIA Drive Xavier at 21 TOPS was not the right comparison, and rather it should have been against NVIDIA's own full self-driving hardware the Drive AGX Pegasus capable of 320 TOPS. Oh, and NVIDIA also claimed Tesla erroneously reported Drive Xavier's performance was 21 TOPS instead of 30 TOPS. It is interesting how one company was quick to recognize itself as the unmarked competition, especially at a time when Intel, via their Mobileye division, have also given them a hard time recently. Perhaps this is a sign of things to come in that self-driving cars, and AI computing in general, is getting too big a market to be left to third-party manufacturing, with larger companies opting for in-house hardware itself. This move does hurt NVIDIA's focus in this field, as market speculation is ongoing that they may end up losing other customers following Tesla's departure.

NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Third Quarter Fiscal 2019

NVIDIA today reported revenue for the third quarter ended Oct. 28, 2018, of $3.18 billion, up 21 percent from $2.64 billion a year earlier, and up 2 percent from $3.12 billion in the previous quarter. GAAP earnings per diluted share for the quarter were $1.97, up 48 percent from $1.33 a year ago and up 12 percent from $1.76 in the previous quarter. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share were $1.84, up 38 percent from $1.33 a year earlier and down 5 percent from $1.94 in the previous quarter.

"AI is advancing at an incredible pace across the world, driving record revenues for our datacenter platforms," said Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA. "Our introduction of Turing GPUs is a giant leap for computer graphics and AI, bringing the magic of real-time ray tracing to games and the biggest generational performance improvements we have ever delivered.

Volvo Partners with NVIDIA and will Integrate Its Drive AGX Xavier Into Cars In 2020

NVIDIA has long worked in the field of artificial intelligence applied to self-driving, and the fruits of that work are beginning to appear. Volvo has announced an alliance with NVIDIA whereby the carmaker will use NVIDIA'S Drive AGX Xavier computer in its next generation of vehicles. This system allows level 4 autonomy in controlled areas, although initially they will restrict their capacity to "Level 2+" that will more or less bring it up to the level offered by the current Tesla models.

The first Volvo cars to integrate this system will be available in the early 2020s, and will not only monitor the vehicle's surroundings but will also follow the driver's head and eye movements to detect possible events that the car's sensors have failed to capture. Volvo is not the first to reach such an agreement with NVIDIA: the company has already reached an agreement with Volkswagen earlier this year to take advantage of its Drive IX platform, and other customers such as Uber and Daimler have also made use of NVIDIA solutions in this field.

NVIDIA Turing SDKs Now Available

NVIDIA's Turing architecture is one of the biggest leaps in computer graphics in 20 years. Here's a look at the latest developer software releases to take advantage of this cutting-edge GPU. CUDA 10: CUDA 10 includes support for Turing GPUs, performance optimized libraries, a new asynchronous task-graph programming model, enhanced CUDA & graphics API interoperability, and new developer tools. CUDA 10 also provides all the components needed to build applications for NVIDIA's most powerful server platforms for AI and high performance computing (HPC) workloads, both on-prem (DGX-2) and in the cloud (HGX-2).

TensorRT 5 - Release Candidate: TensorRT 5 delivers up to 40x faster inference performance over CPUs through new optimizations, APIs and support for Turing GPUs. It optimizes mixed precision inference dramatically across apps such as recommenders, neural machine translation, speech and natural language processing. TensorRT 5 highlights include INT8 APIs offering new flexible workflows, optimization for depthwise separable convolution, support for Xavier-based NVIDIA Drive platforms and the NVIDIA DLA accelerator. In addition, TensorRT 5 brings support for Windows and CentOS Operating Systems.

Aquantia to Deliver Multi-Gig Ethernet Capabilities on NVIDIA DRIVE Platforms

Aquantia Corp., a leader in high-speed, Multi-Gig Ethernet connectivity solutions, today announced that its automotive networking portfolio is the 10 Gbps Ethernet connectivity solution for the NVIDIA DRIVE Xavier and DRIVE Pegasus platforms for autonomous vehicles. The high-performance NVIDIA AI computing platforms featuring Aquantia Multi-Gig networking will be available to automotive partners starting in the first quarter of 2018.

NVIDIA DRIVE AI car computers use deep learning to process data from multiple cameras, radar, LIDAR and other sensors throughout the vehicle. To deliver Level 4 and Level 5 driving - which is categorized as a fully autonomous vehicle - hundreds of trillions of deep learning operations per second (TOPS) need to receive and process sensor data and immediately communicate critical decisions throughout the vehicle's systems. For example, the DRIVE Xavier processor parses all the information to understand a full 360-degree perception around the vehicle, and determine the presence and movement of pedestrians, other vehicles and objects as it plans a safe path forward. The Aquantia Ethernet products communicate the data and decisions back and forth throughout the system at 10 Gbps over automotive Ethernet cables to help provide a seamless autonomous experience.

NVIDIA to Build "Volta" Consumer GPUs on TSMC 12 nm Process

NVIDIA's next-generation "Volta" GPU architecture got its commercial debut in the most unlikely class of products, with the Xavier autonomous car processor. The actual money-spinners based on the architecture, consumer GPUs, will arrive some time in 2018. The company will be banking on its old faithful fab TSMC, to build those chips on a new 12 nanometer FinFET node that's currently under development. TSMC's current frontline process is the 16 nm FFC, which debuted in mid-2015, with mass-production following through in 2016. NVIDIA's "GP104" chip is built on this process.

This could also mean that NVIDIA could slug it out against AMD with its current GeForce GTX 10-series "Pascal" GPUs throughout 2017-18, even as AMD threatens to disrupt NVIDIA's sub-$500 lineup with its Radeon Vega series, scheduled for Q2-2017. NVIDIA's "Volta" architecture could see stacked DRAM technologies such as HBM2 gain more mainstream exposure, although competing memory standards such as GDDR6 aren't too far behind.

NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Third Quarter Fiscal 2017

NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) today reported revenue for the third quarter ended October 30, 2016, of $2.00 billion, up 54 percent from $1.30 billion a year earlier, and up 40 percent from $1.43 billion in the previous quarter. GAAP earnings per diluted share for the quarter were $0.83, up 89 percent from $0.44 a year ago and up 102 percent from $0.41 in the previous quarter. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share were $0.94, up 104 percent from $0.46 a year earlier and up 77 percent from $0.53 in the previous quarter.

"We had a breakout quarter - record revenue, record margins and record earnings were driven by strength across all product lines," said Jen-Hsun Huang, founder and chief executive officer, NVIDIA. "Our new Pascal GPUs are fully ramped and enjoying great success in gaming, VR, self-driving cars and datacenter AI computing. "We have invested years of work and billions of dollars to advance deep learning. Our GPU deep learning platform runs every AI framework, and is available in cloud services from Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and Alibaba, and in servers from every OEM. GPU deep learning has sparked a wave of innovations that will usher in the next era of computing," he said.

NVIDIA Announces Xavier, Volta-based Autonomous Transportation SoC

At its inaugural European edition of the Graphics Technology Conference (GTC), NVIDIA announced Xavier, an "AI supercomputer for the future of autonomous transportation." An evolution of its Drive PX2 board that leverages a pair of "Maxwell" GPUs with some custom logic and an ARM CPU, to provide cars with the compute power necessary to deep-learn the surroundings and self-drive, or assist-drive; Xavier is a refinement over Drive PX2 in that it merges three chips - two GPUs and one control logic into an SoC.

You'd think that NVIDIA refined its deep-learning tech enough to not need a pair of "Maxwell" SoCs, but Xavier is more than that. The 7 billion-transistor chip built on 16 nm FinFET process, offers more raw compute performance thanks to leveraging NVIDIA's next-generation "Volta" architecture, one more advanced than even its current "Pascal" architecture. The chip features a "Volta" GPU with 512 CUDA cores. The CVA makes up the vehicle I/O, while an image processor that's capable of 8K HDR video streams feeds the chip with visual inputs from various cameras around the vehicle. An 8-core ARM CPU performs general-purpose compute. NVIDIA hopes to get the first engineering samples of Xavier out to interested car-makers by Q4-2017.
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