ASUS TUF Gaming M5 Mouse Review 2

ASUS TUF Gaming M5 Mouse Review

Surface & Build Quality »

Packaging


A lot of companies are considering small, environmentally friendly packaging nowadays, with less plastic and more easily recyclable materials—I like where we're going with this! The ASUS TUF Gaming M5 comes in one of these, so there is no front window with a flap you can flip open or a plastic cover as there is only a small package with the usual render pictures and technical specifications. The contents of the box are the mouse itself and a quick-start guide, so there are no extra mouse feet, unfortunately. However, the cable is not in very tight loops, as is often the case with mice, so it will straighten out pretty quickly with some use, which is a nice touch.

Shape


As can clearly be seen in these pictures, and with the comparisons, the TUF Gaming M5 is a mouse with an absolutely unique shape. It has an ambidextrous shape, but there are side buttons on the left side only, so it's mainly designed for right-handed users. The only mouse that resembles its feel in hand out of my repertoire is the Ninox Venator, but even it feels different in a lot of areas. This is a small, short mouse with a very high and bulky profile. The sides are grooved in a concave way, so maintaining a steady grip is easier while moving or picking up the M5. The main buttons don't feature any comfort grooves; however, it's a rare feature with such a small mouse anyways.


In all honestly, I absolutely love this shape. I use a somewhat relaxed claw grip (with a hand size of roughly 18 cm x 9.5 cm), and for me, this shape is nirvana. However, this does not mean that it will suit everyone. There is one crucial flaw in the shell design: the bottom edges instantly scrape the mouse pad once you tilt the mouse to its sides even slightly. This means if you are a low sensitivity gamer and tend to pick the mouse up a lot after your swipes, you may not find the TUF Gaming M5 any good for your needs (of course, this isn't an issue some sandpaper couldn't fix, but most people don't like using such harsh methods just after buying a new product).


Now for the measurements—the M5 is about 111 mm (4.37") long, which means we're talking about a very short mouse here. The width is 61 mm (2.4") at the widest part, but the actual width at which it is gripped is way narrower, sitting at only 53 mm (2.08"). It is about 42 mm (1.65") high at the tallest point, and the hump is located in the back area. I think it's safe to say that this mouse will mainly be comfortable for claw (and maybe fingertip) grippers with hands that are about 16–20 cm long, but there are of course always exceptions depending on each individual's personal preferences. People with small hands might even be able to comfortably palm grip the M5 due to its high back profile.

Here are some extra pictures of the mouse:




Comparisons

Here are some shape/size comparisons with other mice:


Logitech G305


Cougar Minos X5


Ninox Venator


Zowie FK2
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