Tuesday, January 24th 2012

Marketing and Prejudice Get the Better of Consumers with PC Processors: Test

At the AMD & HardOCP Game Experience event held in Texas, gamers were asked to participate in a blind test. The test involved gaming on two sets of gaming PCs with two PCs each, in each set is an AMD-powered PC, and an Intel-powered one. Participants weren't disclosed which PC was driven by what, as they were assembled in identical-looking cases (no window), with identical monitors and other peripherals. The first set is of budget single-monitor HD gaming, while the second set is high-end three-monitor gaming.

After gaming on both rigs in each set, respondents were asked to tick on a sheet of paper, which rig gave them a better gaming experience, or if gaming both had no observable difference. AMD went into this exercise expecting that most respondents will select "no difference" as their option, and so that would bring good PR to AMD, but to their surprise, most respondents selected the rigs that was powered by AMD processors.

In the budget single-monitor gaming machine, the AMD machine (system B) was powered by AMD A8-3850, ASRock A55 chipset motherboard; the Intel machine (system A) was powered by Intel Core i3-2105, and ASRock H61 chipset motherboard. The goal was to configure the PCs to cost under US $500. Both machines were made to use CPU-integrated graphics Ofcourse the respondants were not told which machine was driven by what. The results are as follows:
  • System A (Intel Core i3-2105) better: 5 votes
  • System B (AMD A8-3850) better: 136 votes
  • No difference: 2 votes
With the high-end gaming machines, the Intel machine (system A) was powered by Intel Core i7-2700K, with ASRock P67 Fatal1ty motherboard; the AMD machine (system B) was powered by AMD FX-8150 with ASRock 990FX Fatal1ty motherboard, both machines were given Radeon HD 7970 graphics driving 3-monitor Eyefinity. Again, the respondents didn't know which system was driven by what processor. Results are as follows:
  • System A (Intel Core i7-2700K) better: 40 votes
  • System B (AMD FX-8150) better: 73 votes
  • No difference: 28 votes
The results of this little experiment modeled along the lines of PepsiCo's famous blind-tests of the 1970s shows that marketing and prejudice get the better of consumers, at least in the case of PC processors.Source: LegitReviews
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80 Comments on Marketing and Prejudice Get the Better of Consumers with PC Processors: Test

#1
TIGR
by: Red_Machine
In previous tests, in partitular the IE9 WebGL tests, they used slower RAM on the Intel machines.
Do you happen to have a link to a source/info/that test (not doubting, just want to look it over myself)?
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#2
Red_Machine
Sorry, I had a look around, but I can't find it. It was a good few years ago now.
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#3
Wile E
Power User
by: Mussels
i've done LAN events where it was blind tested with other users rigs, and people can never tell. its usually about the peripherals, unless there is some drastic hardware change - crossfire vs single GPU, and so on.
That's what I'm getting at. Saying the AMD feels faster is BS. They should feel the same in games.

The only exceptions to that would be a bug of some sort on either setup, or the Intel would feel faster in the cases where a game is only borderline smooth on an Intel rig, as in those rare cases the couple of fps the AMD is behind would be noticeable. Other than those 2 rare instances, they should pretty much feel the same. (Only in games, of course)
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#4
xenocide
by: Wile E
That's what I'm getting at. Saying the AMD feels faster is BS. They should feel the same in games.

The only exceptions to that would be a bug of some sort on either setup, or the Intel would feel faster in the cases where a game is only borderline smooth on an Intel rig, as in those rare cases the couple of fps the AMD is behind would be noticeable. Other than those 2 rare instances, they should pretty much feel the same. (Only in games, of course)
I still think it's that. In the SS I think I see BF3 on the screen, HTing doesn't play nice with high-end video cards in BF3. My friend has a GTX580 and i7-950 (I think) and was getting really bad Micro Stuttering with HTing on. Once he turned it off the game was running smooth as silk. If they did something like that, they would know people would find it less enjoyable, and technically they aren't fudging the tests (both stock setups after all) but people would have less fun playing on a system with terrible Micro Stutter.
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