Tuesday, July 9th 2013

Intel Roadmap Outlines LGA to BGA Transition

Intel's first processors in the BGA (ball-grid array) package, arrive by the end of 2013, according to a leaked roadmap slide. Some of the first of these processors will span across entry-level market segments, covering the Celeron and Pentium brands. The term system-on-chip (SoC) better defines these chips than processors, as they completely integrate the processor as we know it, with the motherboard chipset. Motherboards with BGA processors come with the processors non-replaceable, and hard-wired to the board, with a stock fan-heatsink.

Intel's first SoCs for the desktop are based on the "BayTrail-D" silicon. These include the Celeron J1750, Celeron J1850, and Pentium J2850. Celeron J1750 is a dual-core part, with the CPU cores clocked at 2.41 GHz, GPU at 792 MHz, and a TDP rated at just 10W. Celeron J1850, on the other hand, is a quad-core part, with its CPU cores clocked at 2.00 GHz, and the same 792 MHz GPU. Pentium J2850 tops the series, being a quad-core part with CPU cores running at 2.41 GHz, and GPU at 792 MHz. Both these quad-core parts stick to 10W TDP. Being SoCs, these chips integrate connectivity otherwise handled by a PCH, into the processor package. According to an Intel roadmap slide, the three parts will spearhead Intel's BGA CPU lineup deep into 2014, at least as far as late-June.

Then there are the mainstream-thru-performance segments. These are chips based on the Haswell-GT3 package. Haswell GT3 is a quad-core Haswell silicon with a larger iGPU. This iGPU features double the number of execution units to conventional Haswell GT1/GT2 (40 EUs vs. 20 EUs); and a large L4 eDRAM cache. Among the first BGA performance-segment parts from Intel, are the Core i5-4570R, i5-4670R, and Core i7-4770R.

The i5-4570R features 2.70 GHz CPU clocks, 3.20 GHz Turbo Boost, 4 MB of L3 cache, Iris Pro 5200 graphics clocked at 1150 MHz, and 65W TDP. The i5-4670R ups that with 3.00 GHz CPU clocks, 3.70 GHz Turbo Boost, the same 4 MB of L3 cache, but faster Iris Pro graphics clocked at 1.30 GHz. Leading the pack is the Core i7-4770R, with 6 MB L3 cache, HyperThreading, 3.20 GHz CPU clocks, 3.90 GHz Turbo Boost, and the same 1.30 GHz graphics core.Source: MyCE
Add your own comment

55 Comments on Intel Roadmap Outlines LGA to BGA Transition

#1
Scatler
Oh well, it looks like my next processor will be an amd one if intel wants to go down this road.
Posted on Reply
#2
james888
I wonder what an enthusiast bga system would look like. Sounds like and oxymoron in a way.
Posted on Reply
#3
Jstn7477
I'd probably be okay with it as long as the board doesn't die. Given my track record with my current fleet of i7 systems, I think I'll be alright. It's not so good for people who swap CPUs or boards often, though.
Posted on Reply
#4
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I assume these soldered chips are finding their way into systems that fulfill a menial task (like internet...the lion's share of devices these days). Soldering should mean cheaper, smaller, and more energy efficient. If it delivers on all of those metrics, it will be good. If it does not, it will be bad.

I don't think soldered chips will threaten high end systems any time soon because none of the above is a huge concern.
Posted on Reply
#5
The Von Matrices
by: FordGT90Concept
I assume these soldered chips are finding their way into systems that fulfill a menial task (like internet...the lion's share of devices these days). Soldering should mean cheaper, smaller, and more energy efficient. If it delivers on all of those metrics, it will be good. If it does not, it will be bad.

I don't think soldered chips will threaten high end systems any time soon because none of the above is a huge concern.
Well, the i7 R-series processors are very close in performance to the highest end LGA1150 chips, so I'm not sure that they are just for menial tasks, particularly since the 128MB L4 cache can be used to accelerate applications other than graphics. The i7-4770R is a fast chip and I'm sure there are applications where the benefit from the cache more than compensates for the reduced base clock speeds.

I've never replaced a processor and not the motherboard at the same time, so I am not bothered by not being able to separate them. But I don't want to be stuck buying a top-end motherboard if I want a top-end processor. I don't use all the integrated functions (extra SATA. USB, etc.) on most high end motherboards and would prefer to save the money.

Edit: I noticed that even some low end Celerons will now be quad-core. That's quite a testament to how far processors have come.
Posted on Reply
#6
TRWOV
10w quad-core? That's >9" tablet territory *drools*
Posted on Reply
#7
Mussels
Moderprator
i doubt these will end up in desktops - just portables and nettops.

people can stop their fanboying and doomsaying.
Posted on Reply
#8
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Mussels
i doubt these will end up in desktops - just portables and nettops.

people can stop their fanboying and doomsaying.
They're desktop parts, meant for PC motherboards. The Pentium and Celeron parts will make it to nettops and mini-ITX motherboards; while the Core i5/i7 ones will go to mini-ITX and ATX/micro-ATX motherboards.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheLostSwede
Actually, these would be really nice chips for a home server or something similar, 10W TDP is fantastic. Might require a separate RAID card for the hard drives though, as I'm sure Intel will gimp these "SoC's" hard and only allow two SATA 3Gbps devices or something similarly stupid...
Posted on Reply
#10
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: btarunr
They're desktop parts, meant for PC motherboards.
Yep, and it's the future, for sure. Sockets suck. :D
Posted on Reply
#11
Mussels
Moderprator
by: btarunr
They're desktop parts, meant for PC motherboards. The Pentium and Celeron parts will make it to nettops and mini-ITX motherboards; while the Core i5/i7 ones will go to mini-ITX and ATX/micro-ATX motherboards.
perhaps i should have been more specific and said 'full size desktops'
Posted on Reply
#12
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
I'm fairly certain Core i5/i7 BGA chips will make a killing with "full size" HP and Dell desktops. Iris 5200 with 40 EUs could get danger-close to AMD Richland graphics, and Haswell CPU cores will obviously outperform Piledriver CPU cores at these clock speeds.
Posted on Reply
#14
95Viper
by: Mussels
perhaps i should have been more specific and said 'full size desktops'
How about this for their target product... "All-in-One PC Performance: Intel® Core™ i7-4770R Processor"
Lightweight, simpler. An all-in-one PC can be moved from one room to another with fewer wires than a standard desktop and monitor
That makes me think "A big tablet !"
Posted on Reply
#15
Jack1n
I dont really remember a time when i replaced my cpu and kept the motherboard or wise-versa (apart from one time in which i killed my cpu which was my own fault),BGA does not bother me at all.
Posted on Reply
#16
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
by: Jack1n
I dont really remember a time when i replaced my cpu and kept the motherboard or wise-versa (apart from one time in which i killed my cpu which was my own fault),BGA does not bother me at all.
As long as the BGA boards used arent completely awful and terribly made, then its not that bad. Everyone who uses Intel buys a new board with each new processor anyway.
Posted on Reply
#17
loop
I just dont get it, i'm 38 years old and since 1995 i ve change more than 100 rigs with mods custom cooling etc, all ao these only for fun for my hobby, i have a shitty car but i dont care my hobby is o/c ing my last rig is an evga x58 mobo with i7 990x and two hd 7970 cf mode, and i don't play games i live only for 3d mark score and cinebench and crysis only for benching, i ve custom phase change cooling solution and watercooling custom also, i dont care about energy efficiency more over enviromental shit and i dont like apple i world.
The first step was windows 8 witch (looks) like previous operating system from win 7, with support to touck screens, could you find me a way to buy an play games to desktop with touch screen?
The second step is now with intel (seriously F***** clowns, i want changing cpu's whenever i want to to o/c them overvoltaging them!!!!!!!!)now the desktop transforms to like a shitty imac which is not a pc just a nice (vase furniture whatever you want), If i want a laptop or an all in one shit ok but i want my hobby to have future laptops are ok for some people i want tuning and systems with 1.5kw psus.
i don't get it some people reaally wants a toyota prius(suck) i prefer the sound and power from my gtv's v6, Fucking new world
Posted on Reply
#18
d1nky
try delidding that! lol
Posted on Reply
#19
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: d1nky
try delidding that! lol
It's probably not lidded in the first place since it's a BGA chip. I don't find that many BGA chips have heatspreaders.
Posted on Reply
#20
Fourstaff
If they are going to solder 4670K to Maximus VI HERO I am not going to complain, but if they are going to solder 3770K to a H61 board there will be problems.
Posted on Reply
#21
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Aquinus
It's probably not lidded in the first place since it's a BGA chip. I don't find that many BGA chips have heatspreaders.
There's no relation between BGA and lacking IHS.
Posted on Reply
#22
d1nky
all nooby jokes aside. i dont think this is the right path for any processor company to follow for any desktop systems!

what happens to motherboard manufacturers?

what happens if a single component fails, means youll have to strip the lot.

enthusiasts will be put off by not having a 'unique', interchangeable system.

and extreme overclocking would be a nightmare.


im not that biased, i have better things to care about. but it would be good if intel could have this and LGA still in the market.

BGA for the small ITX builds etc
LGA for the rest.

if not welcome to the red side in advance ;)
Posted on Reply
#23
Prima.Vera
God, I miss the old days when you could install on the same motherboard processors from Intel, AMD, Cytrix or IBM. That were good times.
Posted on Reply
#24
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: btarunr
There's no relation between BGA and lacking IHS.
Then show me a BGA chip with a heatspreader then. I've yet to see one.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment