Monday, August 12th 2013

Ivy Bridge-E Not a Cut-down 8-core, 20 MB LLC Die

Unlike Core i7 "Sandy Bridge-E," chips, which were quad-core or six-core parts cut-down from a common silicon shared with Xeon "Sandy Bridge-EP," which physically features eight cores and 20 MB of L3 cache; the upcoming Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" is based on a silicon that physically features just six cores, and 15 MB (or maybe 16 MB) of L3 cache. On the Core i7-4960X Extreme Edition, practically no component on the die is disabled. The Core i7-4930K features just 12 MB of L3 cache, while the Core i7-4820K features two out of six cores disabled, and just 10 MB of L3 cache.

"Ivy Bridge-E" is a variant of one of three large 22 nm dies Intel designed, based on the "Ivy Bridge" micro-architecture, next to a 10-core die with 25 MB of L3 cache, and a 12-core die with 30 MB of L3 cache. Aside from up to six cores, "Ivy Bridge-E" features a PCI-Express gen 3.0 certified root-complex (certified in way that NVIDIA would approve of), and a quad-channel (256-bit wide) DDR3 integrated memory controller, with native support for DDR3-1866. Intel's Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" series should launch on or before the 10th of September. Parts in the series will run on existing socket LGA2011 motherboards, with a BIOS update.Source: VR-Zone
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15 Comments on Ivy Bridge-E Not a Cut-down 8-core, 20 MB LLC Die

#1
draecko
I'm looking forward to upgrading my workstation with one of these 4930k's. I hope the price doesn't skyrocket at launch...:rolleyes:
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#2
RejZoR
Give us 8 cores with HT! 16 threads zoomg :D
Posted on Reply
#3
draecko
by: RejZoR
Give us 8 cores with HT! 16 threads zoomg :D
You'll have to wait a year for Haswell-E I'm afraid (or get a Xeon). :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#4
BigMack70
Yeah I'm holding out hope that Haswell-E may be an 8-core worthy successor to my 4.8 GHz 2600k. Not expecting IVB-E to be worth it.

Still, very interesting news here... I was expecting cut down Xeon chips again.
Posted on Reply
#5
jihadjoe
They probably still share silicone with the Ivy-EP Xeons, it's just that the die arrangement this time is a bit different. Instead of 4 and 6/8, we go to 4/6 and 8/10 dies.
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#6
Octavean
I currently have a Sandy Bridge-E Core i7 3930K and didn't expect much from Ivy Bridge-E even before there was much information about it. IMO, not worth upgrade but maybe worth it if building / buying a new system depending on your needs.

Haswell-E looks interesting and I have higher expectations for it but I would expect the same trifecta of processor release for the platform with similar pricing as we have seen in the past. Meaning two 8 Core processors and maybe a 6 core entry level with a ~$1000, ~$550 to ~$600 and ~$300 pricing scheme respectively.

In other words people will likely have to pay outside of their typical comfort zone to have an Intel 8 Core Haswell-E processor and that doesn't include the price of motherboards (which are likely to cost more) and quasi new DDR4 RAM.

Start saving now unless you are already sitting on a pile of cash,.....
Posted on Reply
#7
badtaylorx
IDK, Ivy has been my fav. arc to date..... a good improvement on the legandary Sandy bridge...im really thinking about upgrading my z77 oc formula and 3570k to a 4960k and z79....

i just hope they release some new motherboards with it....
Posted on Reply
#8
Octavean
by: badtaylorx
IDK, Ivy has been my fav. arc to date..... a good improvement on the legandary Sandy bridge...im really thinking about upgrading my z77 oc formula and 3570k to a 4960k and z79....

i just hope they release some new motherboards with it....
You mean Ivy Bridge-E Core i7 4960K and X79 based motherboard,.....?

There may be some new motherboards but the value of such a thing is questionable without a new chipset. I'd like to see a new chipset over the old X79 but as I have said before in other threads I have seen not so much as a single leak of a new chipset for the current LGA2011 platform. Therefore I don't really expect to see anything new in that respect especially at this late date (August with launch set in September).

I don't think such an update would be of much benefit to you unless you have some special need of more cores and maxing the RAM beyond what is available on your current system.

~$1000 for the Core i7 4960K processor alone is enough to keep most people away,....
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#10
Octavean
by: FireKillerGR
i7 4960x ;)
Indeed you are right Core i7 4960X

I got the "K" from him and didn't correct it,.....
Posted on Reply
#11
PopcornMachine
I will be interested to see if the 4820K will be enough of a boost over my 2500K to warrant a new system.

Probably not, but it's been a while and I'm getting the itch to build.

I just hope its a good chip and priced reasonably.
Posted on Reply
#12
NeoXF
by: popcornmachine
i will be interested to see if the 4820k will be enough of a boost over my 2500k to warrant a new system.

Probably not, but it's been a while and i'm getting the itch to build.

I just hope its a good chip and priced reasonably.
$310
Posted on Reply
#13
Wile E
Power User
Not interested in upgrading until I can get 8 or more cores with HT.
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#14
lilhasselhoffer
...So it takes nearly two years for Intel to functionally design a SB-e successor that isn't just another cut-down variant. Color me unimpressed.

I'll keep my X79 board and 3930k. I just recently got the thing to overclock stably (had to switch motherboards), and 4 GHz with 12 threads isn't too shabby for a constantly run computer. If Intel wants to impress they need to release X89 (or whatever they'd call it). Fully SATA III, 10 SATA ports, and the overheating issues dealt with. Without that I'm of the opinion that IB-e is too late for power users, and doesn't offer enough of an upgrade over Haswell for most consumers.

It's sad. First Intel screws around with the thermal paste, then they take too long to release something for their "enthusiast" consumers. Hopefully Haswell-e is good, but at this rate (even with the rumors that Broadwell was delayed) we won't see is it until late 2015.
Posted on Reply
#15
xorbe
Ironically, having a die with 2 disabled cores would make it easier to cool.
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