Friday, January 24th 2014

Intel Rolls Out Celeron "Bay Trail" Based NUC

Intel is ready with an NUC form-factor system based on its Atom "Bay Trail" SoC. Called the NUC DN2820FYKH, the system runs a Celeron N2820 SoC, which integrates a dual-core 64-bit x86 CPU clocked at 2.40 GHz, and a TDP of under 7.5W. Its board features a single DDR3L SO-DIMM slot, a single SATA 3 Gb/s port, a single USB 3.0 SuperSpeed port, two USB 2.0 ports, HDMI display output, and stereo audio. Network connectivity includes gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WLAN, IrDA, and Bluetooth 4.0. The unit measures 116.6 x 112 x 55 mm, and features a VESA wall-mount, letting you latch it onto your monitor. Intel plans to sell it for US $139.

Source: FanlessTech
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23 Comments on Intel Rolls Out Celeron "Bay Trail" Based NUC

#2
lemonadesoda
HDMI output is a disappointment. With the direction of TVs and monitors in 2014, we need dual link DVI (old skool) or DP 1.2 (new standard) and nothing less.

Price at $139 is good though.
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#3
ZetZet
by: lemonadesoda
HDMI output is a disappointment. With the direction of TVs and monitors in 2014, we need dual link DVI (old skool) or DP 1.2 (new standard) and nothing less.

Price at $139 is good though.
I think HDMI is actually smart, because you want sound to go through it, having tons of cables on that tiny box is stupid.
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#4
Lipton
by: lemonadesoda
HDMI output is a disappointment. With the direction of TVs and monitors in 2014, we need dual link DVI (old skool) or DP 1.2 (new standard) and nothing less.

Price at $139 is good though.
While 4K UHD is being heavily marketed 'today,' it will take a few years for it to trickle down to the mainstream. There's little real need today, but I would expect at least one HDMI 2.0 for the next generation.
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#5
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
I want just the board and a low profile cooler.
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#6
cyneater
Intel need a Nuc with 4 or more Sata ports.
So people can run them as a nas.
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#7
Deadlyraver
Dual core seems good enough, the frequency is what I am worried about if I am gonna feed it a 1080p video.

Data, however, more than enough. :toast:
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#8
Fourstaff
Add the cost of mSata SSD and RAM suddenly its not so cheap anymore :/
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#9
ZetZet
by: Deadlyraver
Dual core seems good enough, the frequency is what I am worried about if I am gonna feed it a 1080p video.

Data, however, more than enough. :toast:
That celeron should be able to handle 4k.
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#10
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
$139 is a very competitive price. Similar offerings from Zotac like the ZBOX are over $200.
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#11
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Nice little device for the price, but remember the $140 price doesn't include a drive or the memory. The final price once you add a drive and RAM, the price is over $200.

by: Fourstaff
Add the cost of mSata SSD and RAM suddenly its not so cheap anymore :/
It has room for a standard 2.5" HDD/SSD, so you don't have to pay the outrageous prices for an mSATA SSD.

A 2.5" HDD is around $40 and a 4GB stick of DDR3L is around $40 as well. So finally setup price would be around $220, which still isn't that bad.

by: lemonadesoda
HDMI output is a disappointment. With the direction of TVs and monitors in 2014, we need dual link DVI (old skool) or DP 1.2 (new standard) and nothing less.
I don't really see an issue with HDMI. They used HDMI 1.4, which is capable of 4K, and at this point there are way way way more monitors and TVs with HDMI than with Displayport.
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#12
Primoz
by: Deadlyraver
Dual core seems good enough, the frequency is what I am worried about if I am gonna feed it a 1080p video.

Data, however, more than enough. :toast:
A dual core Core 2 (65 nm) at 2,66 GHz can easily handle 1080p. This shouldn't have any problems with 1080p then. 4k prolly won't be doable, but 1080p video is easy peasy.
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#13
Primoz
by: Fourstaff
Add the cost of mSata SSD and RAM suddenly its not so cheap anymore :/
Yes, it is. It gets out at about 200, maybe 250 USD for a really small, quiet and quite fast computer. It's a bargain.
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#14
RejZoR
by: Deadlyraver
Dual core seems good enough, the frequency is what I am worried about if I am gonna feed it a 1080p video.

Data, however, more than enough. :toast:
I hope you do realize that all GPU's of today have integrated GPU, meaning it will decode H.264 through GPU part. Same applies to standalone GeForce/Radeon cards. CPU's don't really decode video unless you're performing a transcoding and even there they often use compute shaders...
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#15
FYFI13
by: RejZoR
I hope you do realize that all GPU's of today have integrated GPU, meaning it will decode H.264 through GPU part. Same applies to standalone GeForce/Radeon cards. CPU's don't really decode video unless you're performing a transcoding and even there they often use compute shaders...
THIS^^. GPU's with integrated GPU's are way to go. If GPU is too weak to decode 4K video then integrated GPU will do the job with no problems :P

Jokes aside, I'm really looking forward to get one of these to replace my Raspbery Pi B.
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#16
wickerman
I have been quite impressed with the Bay Trail in the Dell Venue 8 Pro I got during the holidays. Wish it had a proper SSD though... rather than the weak eMMC. If it did, I'd be happy to use it for more than just basic stuff.

So $150 for a NUC based on Bay Trail really gets my attention. Drop in a decent mSATA drive and 802.11n or 802.11ac and you ahve one hell of a nice box for the money. Very interested in running some XBMC tests on one of these, it runs great on my 8 Pro, only limited by the wifi when streaming 1080p MKVs.
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#17
Blue-Knight
by: lemonadesoda
HDMI output is a disappointment.
Just use an adapter of your choice...
-----

It looks good, I may buy one of this for ordinary tasks (e.g.: watching movies, work, internet) and save some precious kW per month.
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#18
Thefumigator
Bay trail should be quite competitive, at 7.5watts I can only see the C60 as the only close competitor for that price.

the Kabini A6-5200 board costs the same, but its 25W, and doesn't include anything except the board itself with the soldered CPU. But its quad core w/Radeon 8400.
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#19
HisDivineOrder
If this had not turned out to be dual-core, they would have had my money. So close, Intel. So close...

Curious to see how systems built on this do as streamed-to Steam Machines.

Too bad we don't have anyone with one of those value-priced Dell Venue 8's bought over the holidays to tell us how Steam streaming is...

Oh wait a tick! We do. Someone, go test it.
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#20
Ravenas
Aren't we all ready for Mullins and Cherry Trail at this point?
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#21
zsolt_93
I'm going for bay trail soon. Want to grab one of those Asus convertibles to watch movies on the go, and to occupy my time at the university. Might try Steam streaming if i find out how it works. I just need to get over this exam session successfully first to ensure some scholarship.
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#22
RejZoR
by: FYFI13
THIS^^. GPU's with integrated GPU's are way to go. If GPU is too weak to decode 4K video then integrated GPU will do the job with no problems :p

Jokes aside, I'm really looking forward to get one of these to replace my Raspbery Pi B.
You know i was talking about CPU's with integrated GPU...
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#23
FYFI13
Finally i got this baby. CPU is capable of playing high-bitrate 1080p videos very smoothly, though for 4K videos hardware acceleration must be enabled. And it's almost noiseless, absolutely love it.
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