Thursday, April 3rd 2014

AMD's Lisa Su Named UBM Executive of the Year

AMD Senior Vice President and General Manager, Global Business Units, Lisa Su has been named a winner in the EE Times and EDN 2014 UBM Tech ACE Awards in the Executive of the Year category. The awards program honors the people and companies behind the technologies and products that are changing the world of electronics.

The winners were announced at an awards ceremony Tuesday, April 1, at The Fairmont San Jose, during EE Live! "I am flattered and honored to be selected for the UBM 'Executive of the Year' award. When I look at the list of this year's nominees and past winners, it is a who's who of the industry's leaders," said Su. "AMD is in the middle of an important and comprehensive transformation, but it is very much a team effort. On behalf of the entire AMD team, we very much appreciate the recognition for the work."

Su played a key role in fundamentally redefining AMD's strategy and oversaw flawless delivery of AMD's product roadmap in 2013, including the industry's first quad-core x86 SoC designs, the world's first APU with HSA Features, and the ultimate graphics experience for 4K gaming. Under her leadership, AMD had numerous successes in the marketplace, including:
  • Delivering highly sophisticated technology to enable the record launches of both the Microsoft Xbox One and Sony PlayStation 4;
  • Entering into a collaboration with ARM to develop 64-bit ARM-based SoCs, targeting cloud and data center servers and embedded designs;
  • Completing the integration of SeaMicro and securing a high-profile data center design with Verizon to power their new high-performance cloud with AMD SeaMicro SM15000 servers.
"The ACE Awards celebrate the highest achievements in innovation and creativity in electronics design, and selecting one organization or individual that stands out above the rest is incredibly challenging," said Patrick Mannion, VP, Brand Director, UBM Tech Electronics. "The situation at AMD only a couple of years ago was also challenging. Lisa has been a driving force for both vision and execution, leading to significant design wins, and for the company's return to profitability."

A panel of EE Times and EDN editors narrowed down the entries to five finalists in each category, based on the criteria set forth in an online submission form. Winners are determined from among the finalists by a panel of independent judges. Judging took place from Jan. 27, 2014 - Feb. 24, 2014.
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12 Comments on AMD's Lisa Su Named UBM Executive of the Year

#1
Jorge
Congrats to Lisa Su.

Unfortunately AMD completely dropped the ball on a discrete desktop CPU to follow Vishera so now they will lose billions in sales over the next two years along with millions of loyal AMD customers who literally have no choice but to jump ship as AMD has nothing for them to purchase. This wasn't Lisa Su's decision. She just does what she is told to do.
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#2
NC37
Technically didn't drop it completely, just getting behind the more profitable APUs. Unfortunately...performance wise, the APUs suck in comparison. Unless we see 8+ cores, L3 cache, and other things which set the discrete apart from APUs, taking place on APUs, then yeah...to Intel goes the business.

But then again, at the rate technology is stagnating, I've got a few more years on my 8320.
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#3
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
amd has no plans for the next 2 years on the main discrete line. does not mean that they are dropping the ball completely. it can be that they are just waiting for GloFo to get their shit together and start making some decent progress on the newer production processes with higher yeild rate. the more the failure rate glofo has the more amd is losing. Its useless to spend resources on an architecture based on old fabrication processes when intel is 14nm already.

this is a sound strategy as they can now completely focus on the mobile apu and apus in general. mobile apus in laptops is kicking intels ass in low to mid range pcs, increase their profits... which they can invest back into the am socket series 2 years later if all goes well.
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#4
H2323
by: de.das.dude
amd has no plans for the next 2 years on the main discrete line. does not mean that they are dropping the ball completely. it can be that they are just waiting for GloFo to get their shit together and start making some decent progress on the newer production processes with higher yeild rate. the more the failure rate glofo has the more amd is losing. Its useless to spend resources on an architecture based on old fabrication processes when intel is 18nm already.

this is a sound strategy as they can now completely focus on the mobile apu and apus in general. mobile apus in laptops is kicking intels ass in low to mid range pcs, increase their profits... which they can invest back into the am socket series 2 years later if all goes well.
18nm.....does not exist. it's 22nm to 14nm for intel.... 28 to 20 to 16nm for AMD and everyone else. ASnd do not pretend to have a clue what they are going to do.
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#6
Thefumigator
When I see AMD this quiet on desktop, I'm expecting a surprise.
Also, an 8 core apu isn't impossible. Even 12 and 16 core apus could be attractive. Adding L3 caché should be easy. Take out the GPU portion and what you get is an FX.
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#7
SetsunaFZero
by: Thefumigator
When I see AMD this quiet on desktop, I'm expecting a surprise.
Also, an 8 core apu isn't impossible. Even 12 and 16 core apus could be attractive. Adding L3 caché should be easy. Take out the GPU portion and what you get is an FX.
always core's, core's and core's blablabla... this is what makes ppl blind by thinking more core = more performance.
I owned a FX8120 some months ago and i sucks. After many years on the red side i couldn't stand it any more to wait till AMD fixes these issues so i hopped again on the blue train. Face the reality ppl, AMD CPU's massively sucks at single thread performance and latency. As long they don't fix this, I don't see any comeback in the HighEnd market for them.
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#8
Thefumigator
by: SetsunaFZero
always core's, core's and core's blablabla... this is what makes ppl blind by thinking more core = more performance.
I owned a FX8120 some months ago and i sucks. After many years on the red side i couldn't stand it any more to wait till AMD fixes these issues so i hopped again on the blue train. Face the reality ppl, AMD CPU's massively sucks at single thread performance and latency. As long they don't fix this, I don't see any comeback in the HighEnd market for them.
I own an 8320 and what I need is more cores actually. And yes, AMD sucks in single threaded performance, but its not the disaster you described. I need more cores, and no, I'm not blind as you say. More cores is more performance in everything non gaming related. I work in video editing and software development. Gaming is just one part for what a PC is made for. On the other side... take a look at the PS4 and Xbox one. What they've got inside? An APU similar to an A10 with MORE CORES!
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#9
Melvis
by: SetsunaFZero
always core's, core's and core's blablabla... this is what makes ppl blind by thinking more core = more performance.
I owned a FX8120 some months ago and i sucks. After many years on the red side i couldn't stand it any more to wait till AMD fixes these issues so i hopped again on the blue train. Face the reality ppl, AMD CPU's massively sucks at single thread performance and latency. As long they don't fix this, I don't see any comeback in the HighEnd market for them.
In the near future and now its clear that more cores is the future and with software catching up with using more cores its just how its going to be.
If you owned a 8120 then thats your fault for not looking into the reviews first, the Bulldozer core was indeed meh, my mate has one and its OK but indeed it feels very slow. I waited with my Phenom II for another 12months then AMD brought out the Piledriver core and I jumped to the 8350 and its bloody good, kicked the crap out of my i7 940 with ease in multi core performance. Single thread/core performance is indeed less then Intel but they do not "suck" there still respectable and soon to be not as needed in the future with Software going the multi core way, that's just how it is.
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#10
Thefumigator
by: Melvis
In the near future and now its clear that more cores is the future and with software catching up with using more cores its just how its going to be.
If you owned a 8120 then thats your fault for not looking into the reviews first, the Bulldozer core was indeed meh, my mate has one and its OK but indeed it feels very slow. I waited with my Phenom II for another 12months then AMD brought out the Piledriver core and I jumped to the 8350 and its bloody good, kicked the crap out of my i7 940 with ease in multi core performance. Single thread/core performance is indeed less then Intel but they do not "suck" there still respectable and soon to be not as needed in the future with Software going the multi core way, that's just how it is.
Exactly.
Of course, an increase in single threaded performance is always welcome.
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#11
Vario
I'm hoping that Jim Keller revives AMD's performance reputation, moves them away from modules, or at least the currently slow modules. If the modules were faster, thats always a plus!
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#12
Thefumigator
by: Vario
I'm hoping that Jim Keller revives AMD's performance reputation, moves them away from modules, or at least the currently slow modules. If the modules were faster, thats always a plus!
I believe they can improve the modules, or revive the old Thuban core and make it better. Either way, they should not stop. If they stop, they ain't gonna achieve anything
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