Tuesday, July 29th 2014

ATP Introduces advancedMLC (aMLC) Technology

ATP, the leading manufacturer of embedded Flash and ruggedized SSD and DRAM modules, introduces its latest technology, advancedMLC, also known as "aMLC". Developed by ATP, aMLC is an advanced firmware technology uniquely implemented onto ATP's NAND Flash products to vastly improve the endurance and performance of these storage devices while using mainstream MLC NAND to provide the best cost effective solution for any read/write intensive applications.

ATP will showcase this technology and related products at the Flash Memory Summit 2014 from August 5 to 7 at the Santa Clara Convention Center, booth# 516.

Endurance and performance are the two critical factors for a NAND Flash storage device to meet the demanding industrial operating requirements. However, system and product designers often have to make compromises to fulfill the necessary criteria due to the inherent high cost of SLC NAND Flash components. To address this requirement, ATP introduces aMLC technology by implementing its unique firmware to manipulate four states of MLC into two states, which dramatically widens the disturbance margins among NAND Flash cells. In addition, aMLC can provide more than 13x (40K P/E) higher endurance than traditional MLC NAND, with write performance close to SLC. As such, aMLC is best suited for any write intensive application requiring competitive Drive-Write-Per-Day over Cost (DWPD/Cost).

To learn more about ATP aMLC technology and its latest NAND Flash reliability solutions, ATP will deliver a presentation session on "Innovative Reliability NAND Flash Solution Selection and Configuration", on Thursday, August 7th, from 2:40-3:55PM at the Flash Memory Summit conference.

The ATP initial aMLC product lines include mSATA, SlimSATA, and 2.5" SSD, with others to follow.
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4 Comments on ATP Introduces advancedMLC (aMLC) Technology

#1
RejZoR
How can everyone be leading "the leading manufacturer" yet no one has ever heard of them. Heh. All the durability doesn't help me much if there won't be any drives with such NAND inside...
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#2
remixedcat
Hey, nobody has hear of Xirrus for networking, yet they make some pretty badass stuff that's convention center grade
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#3
Mathragh
Can someone explain how this exactly works?

On the surface, what it seems like they're actually doing is transforming the MLC back to SLC memory. How is this different from just using SLC in the first place?
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#4
kn00tcn
by: Mathragh
Can someone explain how this exactly works?

On the surface, what it seems like they're actually doing is transforming the MLC back to SLC memory. How is this different from just using SLC in the first place?
SLC costs more? (maybe)
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