Thursday, August 7th 2014

ADATA Launches XPG Z1 DDR4 Overclocking Memory

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash application products, today launches the first DDR4 overclocking memory of XPG series - XPG Z1, which supports the latest Intel Haswell-E platform for ultimate performance. With the benefits of DDR4, the XPG Z1 is not only a powerful weapon for gaming, also an important component for overclocking.

Performance Boosts with Great Power Efficiency
DDR4 outperforms DDR3 with improved performance and lower power consumption. The operating voltage has decreased from 1.5V to 1.2V, which is a 20% reduction of power, and keeps the system at a low temperature for stable operation. With speeds of up to 2800 MHz, timings of CL 17-17-17 and transfer bandwidth reaching 22 GB/s, the XPG Z1 provides improved efficiency of data transfer than ever. It only requires 1.2V to achieve high clock frequency of 2800 MHz for overclockers. In addition, the SPD (Serial Presence Detect) of XPG Z1 allows direct application without changing settings in the BIOS, facilitating usage and system stability.

Looks cool, Acts cool
The XPG Z1 features a jet wing-inspired design with carbon texture used for race cars, symbolizing the pursuit of extreme performance. Thanks to the unique Thermal Conductive Technology and 10-layer PCBs with 2oz copper, the chips in XPG Z1 can contact with the heat sinks directly, ensuring IC and PCB operate in an environment of equal temperature, as well as reduce electric resistance and consume less power, which greatly enhances the quality of signal transfer.

The Maximum Durability and Assurance
The XPG Z1 DDR4 DRAM Module is made of high-quality chips selected through a strict filtering process. It also uses the top quality PCBs (Printed Circuit Board) that effectively extend the lifespan of memory modules. Additionally, ADATA memory modules provide customers a lifetime warranty for the maximum assurance with excellent service.
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12 Comments on ADATA Launches XPG Z1 DDR4 Overclocking Memory

#1
Prima.Vera
I know is copy/paste from the pamflet, but still... DDR4 can be condsidered occ modules from 4GHz and up. You havee GDDR5 that runs more than 6GHz, so...
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#2
HumanSmoke
by: Prima.Vera
I know is copy/paste from the pamflet, but still... DDR4 can be condsidered occ modules from 4GHz and up. You havee GDDR5 that runs more than 6GHz, so...
Bit of an unfair comparison wouldn't you say? DDR either writes to or reads from memory every cycle. GDDR can both read and write on every cycle...so, twice the data transfers of DDR. GDDR's speed also comes at a trade off in overall latency. GDDR5 IC timings have a wide programming range depending on usage scenario's and individual IC's, but you might get a reasonable idea from SiSoft's bench leaderboard. Rank the scores by speed and the GPU wins out, but rank by latency and system memory tops the chart.
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#3
RealNeil
It's a good improvement performance wise, but to me it means that I'm gonna have to start saving for new RAM and Motherboards now,.........(some things never change)
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#4
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: HumanSmoke
Bit of an unfair comparison wouldn't you say? DDR either writes to or reads from memory every cycle. GDDR can both read and write on every cycle...so, twice the data transfers of DDR. GDDR's speed also comes at a trade off in overall latency. GDDR5 IC timings have a wide programming range depending on usage scenario's and individual IC's, but you might get a reasonable idea from SiSoft's bench leaderboard. Rank the scores by speed and the GPU wins out, but rank by latency and system memory tops the chart.
Also keep in mind that GDDR5 ICs are mounted around a CPU in a particular way, probably to prevent clock slew to enable these really high frequencies... but we really should just remember that GDDR5 is just DDR3 optimized for sequential reads and writes.
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#5
Assimilator
I know the technology is new, but still... CL17? Ouch.
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#6
RealNeil
by: Assimilator
I know the technology is new, but still... CL17? Ouch.
CL numbers jumped when we went from DDR2 to DDR3 as well.

It will be faster than what we have now. This is only the start of DDR4.
I expect to see some Wazoo Performance gains with it, and I'm looking forward to using it.
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#7
HumanSmoke
by: Assimilator
I know the technology is new, but still... CL17? Ouch.
Baseline DDR4 is 2133 MT/sec with a latency of CL13 for comparison. The early intro of DDR4 should mirror that of DDR3. When DDR3 arrived it was -800/-1066 with higher specced modules boasting -1333 speed, when there were plenty of DDR2 modules (Crucial Ballistix, Buffalo Firestix, Cellshock, Corsair Dominator etc) that were pushing -1100-1200 with the right board.
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#8
Jorge
by: HumanSmoke
Baseline DDR4 is 2133 MT/sec with a latency of CL13 for comparison. The early intro of DDR4 should mirror that of DDR3. When DDR3 arrived it was -800/-1066 with higher specced modules boasting -1333 speed, when there were plenty of DDR2 modules (Crucial Ballistix, Buffalo Firestix, Cellshock, Corsair Dominator etc) that were pushing -1100-1200 with the right board.
For those who don't understand the CL increases as the RAM frequency increases even though the "real time" may end up being almost the same. See the link below if you don't understand.

That being said DDR4 offers almost nothing in tangible system performance for CPU powered desktop PCs because DDR3 running at 1600 Mhz. has been shown over and over and over to NOT be a system bottleneck.

That means if you use faster RAM than 1600 MHz. with a currently available desktop CPU, you get no tangible gain in system performance because the only gain is the minute change in real time associated with the higher frequency. If DDR3 running at 1600 MHz. was saturated then faster RAM could show large gains but the RAM frequencies far exceed the system needs for CPU powered desktops. For APU powered desktops RAM up to 2133 MHz. shows a modest value in system performance.

You can run the tests yourself as many people have done and see that the higher RAM frequencies be they DDR3 or DDR4 (which is designed for servers, not desktop PCs), there is no tangible system performance gains and as such it's a waste of money other than for bragging rights.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR3_SDRAM
Posted on Reply
#10
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: damric
I saw huge gains in CPU bottlenecked games by running faster RAM.

On my Athlon 760K
http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/comparisons-of-cpu-gpu-ram-overclocks-and-comparing-bottlenecks-fm2-cpu.196940/

And my FX-4100
http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/update-on-my-fx-4100-more-tuning-performance.161062/
Yeah, except for increasing ram speed alone you don't see much. In fact your Far Cry 2 benchmarks on the second link between 1800Mhz (CL8) and 2000Mhz (CL8) the improvement is an average of 38.68 to 39.51, which is an improvement of 2% and in the scientific community 2% could be attributed to error alone. Generally speaking, faster memory have very little impact on gaming performance as your own testing has shown. Your testing shows that memory speeds scale with an overclock, but the memory by itself (with or without OC,) won't yield amazing results.

by: Jorge
For those who don't understand the CL increases as the RAM frequency increases even though the "real time" may end up being almost the same. See the link below if you don't understand.

That being said DDR4 offers almost nothing in tangible system performance for CPU powered desktop PCs because DDR3 running at 1600 Mhz. has been shown over and over and over to NOT be a system bottleneck.

That means if you use faster RAM than 1600 MHz. with a currently available desktop CPU, you get no tangible gain in system performance because the only gain is the minute change in real time associated with the higher frequency. If DDR3 running at 1600 MHz. was saturated then faster RAM could show large gains but the RAM frequencies far exceed the system needs for CPU powered desktops. For APU powered desktops RAM up to 2133 MHz. shows a modest value in system performance.

You can run the tests yourself as many people have done and see that the higher RAM frequencies be they DDR3 or DDR4 (which is designed for servers, not desktop PCs), there is no tangible system performance gains and as such it's a waste of money other than for bragging rights.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR3_SDRAM
I don't agree with Jorge often, but in this case I do. HOWEVER, for people who aren't playing video games, DDR4 should increase DRAM capacity by a large factor which means very little for most people.
Posted on Reply
#11
RealNeil
I'm retired, so my income will stay the same for the rest of my life. Because of this, I don't have the disposable income that I used to when I worked in the Aerospace industry.
I have to really analyze what I'm spending my cash on beforehand and justify it to myself. If I want something badly enough, I sell some of my gear and add a little of my money to afford it.

I don't buy into new technology before others have it, and have reported on it's merits and shortcomings.
So I'll probably sit out DDR4 memory for a while to see if it really matters.
Whether or not it's a show stopper/game changer, the systems that I have now are pretty cool, and I don't HAVE to change a thing to enjoy my games.
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#12
hellrazor
So is this one of those "it costs too much if you have to ask" deals?
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