Friday, October 10th 2008

ASUS Ready with Workstation-class X58 Motherboards

After flaunting the P6T Series motherboards, and the monstrous Rampage II Extreme, ASUS decided to expand its Bloomfield CPU-supportive motherboard lineup with its workstation-class offerings. ASUS is known for bringing in workstation boards on desktop platforms. They have had Intel 975P based workstation boards, just as they had nForce 590 SLI boards. These desktop-thru-worksation platforms are usually single CPU socket platforms, with certain workstation features, such as PCI-X interface, enterprise-grade storage controllers, among other features that make them durable and suitable for mission-critical environments. They don't sport enterprise chipsets, and hence carry batch-leading desktop chipsets.

With Nehalem and the new Socket 1366, ASUS did just that, with the inclusion of two single-socket workstation boards. These motherboards, at the outset support the upcoming Core i7 processors, and have the potential to support Xeon processors that use the same socket, or even the same core. There are two models lined-up: P6T6 WS Revolution and P6T6 WS Pro. The P6T6 WS Revolution is the flagship board. It features six full-length PCI-Express slots, which might have variable number of available PCI-Express lanes, depending on the number of PCI-E cards connected. It features a 16+2 phase CPU power circuit. The board features the Tylersburg X58 chipset, along with an ICH10 series southbridge. There is passive cooling for the VRM area, northbridge, and a large southbridge block, that could be possibly cooling a supplementary PCI-Express switch chip. Storage options include Serial-attached SCSI (SAS), SATA II and e-SATA ports.

As for the P6T6 WS Pro, it is a value-ended workstation board. It comes with only two full-length PCI-E x16 slots that have full electrical bandwidth. It sports two PCI-X slots. It offers essentially the same storage options as the Revolution board. Indications are, that these boards won't be available right upon launch of other X58 chipset boards.Source: XFastest
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25 Comments on ASUS Ready with Workstation-class X58 Motherboards

#1
eidairaman1
why is PCI-X still around when obviously PCI Express has way more bandwidth?
Posted on Reply
#2
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Because there still are PCI-X devices/instruments that WS users would want to stick around with....such as data loggers, telecommunication equipment, etc.
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#4
jbunch07
Wow 6 PCI-e slots. Those are some nice looking boards. :) But then again Asus always makes pretty boards.
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#5
panchoman
Sold my stars!
wait, doesn't pci-x have more bandwidth?
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#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: panchoman
wait, doesn't pci-x have more bandwidth?
than PCI? Yes. The most a 133 MHz slot can offer is 1067 MB/s. A single PCI-E 2.0 lane offers 500 MB/s each direction.
Posted on Reply
#7

I like the P6T6 WS Pro, the much needed single PCI slot for our professional PCI sound card is still there thank God!
Posted on Edit | Reply
#8
Morgoth
anny signs of dual socket mainboards?
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#9
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Morgoth
anny signs of dual socket mainboards?
Yes, Foxconn already has a dual-1366 board ready with a tweaked X58 in the making.
Posted on Reply
#11
Wile E
Power User
by: btarunr
Yes, Foxconn already has a dual-1366 board ready with a tweaked X58 in the making.
You know, I'm starting to think a Foxconn might be the next maker I purchase a board from. They have been coming out with some nice innovations in the past year or so.

Altho the Revolution posted above does look mighty tempting. I am so ready to get rid of PCI slots. And on a pure PCIe board, it only makes sense to use full length slots to maximize placement options.
Posted on Reply
#12
eidairaman1
by: Wile E
You know, I'm starting to think a Foxconn might be the next maker I purchase a board from. They have been coming out with some nice innovations in the past year or so.

Altho the Revolution posted above does look mighty tempting. I am so ready to get rid of PCI slots. And on a pure PCIe board, it only makes sense to use full length slots to maximize placement options.
aslong as their bios crew does stuff right for the modding community.
Posted on Reply
#13
JrRacinFan
Served 5k and counting ...
by: eidairaman1
aslong as their bios crew does stuff right for the modding community.
Actually their bios' aren't horrible. Not too too simple, and I have never heard of a bios flash going stuff up from them. I will have to agree with you in one aspect though. They aren't as bad as Abit was/is but bios releases are seldom unless it's a popular board.

On Topic

Ever since I've seen the revolution it makes me want it more and more every time I see it again. One heck of a board.
Posted on Reply
#14
eidairaman1
by: JrRacinFan
Actually their bios' aren't horrible. Not too too simple, and I have never heard of a bios flash going stuff up from them. I will have to agree with you in one aspect though. They aren't as bad as Abit was/is but bios releases are seldom unless it's a popular board.

On Topic

Ever since I've seen the revolution it makes me want it more and more every time I see it again. One heck of a board.
are you talking about the Current Abit or the Abit of Yore, because they had a Superior Overclocking Motherboard for Socket A, and i believe 939 even.
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#15
Jizzler
6 Slots!!

Asus, here is a blank check with my name on it, write any amount of money on it and I will pay!
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#16
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: eidairaman1
why is PCI-X still around when obviously PCI Express has way more bandwidth?
Most setups won't saturate a PCI-X bus, most commonly 133MHz/1066MB/s. Though PCI-X 2.0 allows up to 4GB/s. So bandwidth really isn't a reason to upgrade. Considering high end storage controllers/network hardware is quite expensive it's always nice to be able to reuse it in the new server.
Apart from that, PCI-X is being phased out like PCI. It's just a slightly slower process. Mostly not due to bandwidth though, more due to tracing on the motherboards.
Posted on Reply
#17
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: btarunr
Yes, Foxconn already has a dual-1366 board ready with a tweaked X58 in the making.
It's odd that Nehalem uses the same socket for desktops and entry level server/workstation again. On the other hand I'm pretty sure they didn't forget all the previous lessons about mixing those two markets. (ie dual Celeron systems, dual socket boards using desktop chipsets)
Posted on Reply
#18
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: DanTheBanjoman
It's odd that Nehalem uses the same socket for desktops and entry level server/workstation again. On the other hand I'm pretty sure they didn't forget all the previous lessons about mixing those two markets. (ie dual Celeron systems, dual socket boards using desktop chipsets)
These are stopgaps, much like LGA775 Kentsfield Xeons. I'm sure the 'real' enterprise platform comes later (Nehalem-EX).



Say hello to 144 GB system memory. That's the Foxconn board. There's another one with 4 DIMM slots /socket:


Posted on Reply
#19
Katanai
That revolution board is probably the best designed board I ever saw. I mean it's really time that we drop the old legacy crap and move forward. Technically speaking you could have 12 GPU's and 8 CPU threads with that setup. Now that would kill Crysis once and for all. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#20
eidairaman1
by: btarunr
These are stopgaps, much like LGA775 Kentsfield Xeons. I'm sure the 'real' enterprise platform comes later (Nehalem-EX).



Say hello to 144 GB system memory. That's the Foxconn board. There's another one with 4 DIMM slots /socket:



About Dual Socket Motherboards

Athlon MP that was just a Athlon XP Wired DIfferently by the Bridges

http://fab51.com/cpu/barton/athlon-e24.html

Wouldnt be surprised if someone could overclock 2 of the Athlon-MPs (Modified AXPs) with a mod bios and get 2.5-2.7 GHz out of each.
Posted on Reply
#21
mmaakk
Is it just me, or the NB heat sink for this new row of boards is shrinking?
Posted on Reply
#22
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: mmaakk
Is it just me, or the NB heat sink for this new row of boards is shrinking?
Yes, and it's natural. The northbridge doesn't house a memory controller anymore. That removes a chunk of its machinery. All it holds is QPI connections to the CPU, QPI/DMI connections to the southbridge, a beefy PCI-Express switch, and some clock-generators. Add to that, X58 uses a newer silicon fab process of 45nm. So it runs a lot cooler. Don't fall for motherboards that sport "OMGWTFBBQ" chipset coolers. They're less likely to benefit you in any way. When OC'ing, you won't be touching the NB voltage anymore.
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#23
mmaakk
I'm impressed!! "btarunr" you are SUPER!

Thanks for the great explanation.

I beat that if I was paying to obtain this kind of info. would take longer and maybe not that well explained.
Posted on Reply
#24
Hayder_Master
heat sink is weak comparing with other asus mobo's
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