Monday, May 18th 2009

NEC Electronics Introduces World's First USB 3.0 Host Controller

NEC Electronics today introduced the world's first Universal Serial Bus (USB) host controller (part number µPD720200) for the new SuperSpeed USB 3.0 standard. NEC Electronics expects rapid adoption of the device and standard as the need to transfer larger and larger amounts of information between PCs to external hard-drives, portable electronics devices, and flash-based thumb drives, continues to grow rapidly.
The µPD720200 device is a host controller for PCs and other digital devices, and is based on the new version of the SuperSpeed USB standard. Supporting the world's fastest USB transfer speeds of up to 5 gigabits per second (Gbps) of data, which is 10 times faster than previous USB 2.0 transfer speeds. The NEC Electronics device, as well as the standard, is fully backward compatible with the USB 2.0, 1.1 and 1.0 versions of the USB standard.


With its high-speed transfer capability, the µPD720200 host controller makes it possible to expand the boundaries of digital appliances such as PCs, digital TVs, and DVD recorders. The new SuperSpeed USB 3.0 chip from NEC Electronics requires only 70 seconds to transfer 25 Gb of video content on a blu-ray disc, compared to 14 minutes to transfer the same content when using the high-speed USB 2.0 with 480 Mbps transfer capability. This enormous increase in transfer speed will enable system designers to transfer large-volume data quickly and without stress and develop a new generation of high-performance consumer electronic products.

USB is the next-generation interface standard used in a wide range of electronic devices including PCs and PC peripherals. Originally designed as an interface for relatively low-speed computer peripherals, USB made it possible to connect keyboards, mice, and other devices with the same USB standard cables. Later, version 2.0 of the standard defined a high-speed transfer mode that made USB a practical and popular interface for devices such as digital televisions, digital cameras, and DVD recorders. USB version 3.0 builds on this success by offering a ten-fold increase in speed, for stress-free transfers of large volumes of data.

The high data transfer rate also offers compatibility with recent high-performance computer interfaces such as PCI Express and SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment), which are capable of data transfer at speeds in excess of 3 Gbps.

As a member of the USB Implementers Forum since 1996, NEC Electronics has played a leading role both in defining the USB standards and in developing USB technology. In 2000, the company launched the µPD720100, the world's first USB 2.0-compliant host controller chip. It has also developed hub controllers and an extensive lineup of other USB devices, all of which are certified to display the USB logo. As a result, the company has won the trust of the marketplace and shipped 161 million USB devices as of March 2009.

NEC Electronics expects the market for USB 3.0 products to begin a rapid expansion in 2010. It intends to market the new µPD720200 USB 3.0 controller aggressively, and to offer a range of related products by incorporating USB 3.0 communications as an IP (intellectual property) core function in various application specific ICs.

Please refer to the separate sheet for the main specifications of µPD720200.

Pricing and Availability
Samples of NEC Electronics' µPD720200 host controller are expected to be available in June 2009 at US$15 each, along with free Windows device driver software. Monthly production is expected to reach approximately 1,000,000 units in September 2009. Pricing and availability are subject to change without notice. More information can be found at http://www.necel.com/usb/en/index.html.Source: Nec
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27 Comments on NEC Electronics Introduces World's First USB 3.0 Host Controller

#1
DanishDevil
Glad to see something that will be able to take advantage of high speed SSD's in relation to flash drives. I still want powered eSATA, but if this will allow transfer speeds of around 200MB/s (10 x 20MB/s which is fairly average for a USB flash drive) then this should steal its thunder if it's implemented properly.
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#2
h3llb3nd4
thats tiiiiiiiiny!
cam we fit them onto our current Mobos?:laugh:
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#4
mlee49
Whoo Hoo! USB3.0 will be here before we know it!!!
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#5
A Cheese Danish
I'm definitely gonna have to try and put one of these into my laptop :D
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#6
lemonadesoda
My correct data/communications bottleneck isnt actually USB, but is ethernet. Time for gigabit ethernet to improve, esp. the protocols managing file transfer. NEVER have I achieved anything like 1Gbit/s speeds for data transfer.

If there is so much redundancy, protocol overhead, and error/contention on gigabit network, then there is only ONE ANSWER: faster.
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#7
KainXS
I don't see why usb 3 is so hyped, it will more than likely not even reach half the speed its rated at

and use for hdd's will probably be no different than using esata


not to mention we won't see USB 3.0 devices truly utilizing the spec for about 2 years after its launch anyway
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#8
ITman
by: lemonadesoda
My correct data/communications bottleneck isnt actually USB, but is ethernet. Time for gigabit ethernet to improve, esp. the protocols managing file transfer. NEVER have I achieved anything like 1Gbit/s speeds for data transfer.

If there is so much redundancy, protocol overhead, and error/contention on gigabit network, then there is only ONE ANSWER: faster.
Ethernet is not the bottleneck in most cases. Probably in your case the bottleneck is disk i/o
Remember 1000Mbps is 125MB/s. You'd be hard pressed to find a single hard drive in a regular desktop or laptop that can achieve this throughput for duration of a long benchmarking run. Personally I was easily able to get sustained 950+Mbps bandwidth throughput between couple dell servers with a bunch of 15,000 rpm sas drives running raid0 (running ftp between the two)
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#9
Kitkat
by: KainXS
I don't see why usb 3 is so hyped, it will more than likely not even reach half the speed its rated at

and use for hdd's will probably be no different than using esata


not to mention we won't see USB 3.0 devices truly utilizing the spec for about 2 years after its launch anyway
yes less talk more rock we been talking about this FOREVER wheres 4 allready :laugh:
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#10
wiak
by: lemonadesoda
My correct data/communications bottleneck isnt actually USB, but is ethernet. Time for gigabit ethernet to improve, esp. the protocols managing file transfer. NEVER have I achieved anything like 1Gbit/s speeds for data transfer.

If there is so much redundancy, protocol overhead, and error/contention on gigabit network, then there is only ONE ANSWER: faster.
my wireless network does around 6-10 MB/s :p
my wired network does around 40-60 MB/s
my harddrives does around 80 MB/s

we need SATA 6.0Gbps and PCI Express 3.0 ASAP! :p
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#11
xenos
So who knows what hardware is required server side for network shares of around 80MB/sec on the server end assuming a c2d client with a raid 0 setup capable of ~150MB/sec locally.

I've been looking at all the different NAS devices, thinking of building my own using a 1.6ghz atom and 945gse, what would that serve up? Assuming good 7200RPM disks.

Plus if i could get a decent hardware raid controller to fit into the board (PCI based only I think) with a 2 drive raid-1 or 4 drive raid-5 what could I achieve with this setup?

Thanks in advance :-D


PS. What things should I look out for that slow network shares down?
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#12
lemonadesoda
by: wiak
my wireless network does around 6-10 MB/s :p
my wired network does around 40-60 MB/s
my harddrives does around 80 MB/s
That's pretty impressive wireless transfer rates. You must be on "n" and quite close to router.

40-60 MB/s on wired is pretty good if sustained and when moving/copying windows shares. I think my issue is that I have a relatively large/complex network and not all points are giga. The backbone is, but the NAS is hanging off the router at 100. I guess I need to think about fixing that.:laugh:
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#13
wiak
on vista/7/2008 NetworkThrottlingIndex needs a fix

put this in a .reg file and run it ;)

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionMultimediaSystemProfile]
"NetworkThrottlingIndex"=dword:00000070
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#14
lemonadesoda
I'm on 2K3, but nonetheless, interesting fact. Thanks for the .reg, I'll look to see if there are similar XP hacks.
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#15
xenos
Anybody? Plus what does that reg hack achieve? :-)
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#16
Mussels
Moderprator
USB 2.0 is capped at 30MB/s each way. USB 3.0 will be more like 300, matching SATA-II's speeds.

USB 3.0 flash drives will be just like SSD's - even with all the pessimists in this thread, i'm still excited.
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#17
Mussels
Moderprator
by: wiak
on vista/7/2008 NetworkThrottlingIndex needs a fix

put this in a .reg file and run it ;)

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionMultimediaSystemProfile]
"NetworkThrottlingIndex"=dword:00000070
could you explain this fix to me?
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#18

"I don't see why usb 3 is so hyped, it will more than likely not even reach half the speed its rated at

and use for hdd's will probably be no different than using esata"

You Forget that USB3 dont need a power adapter like eSata the big advantage is there!!!
:toast:
And If the speed is twice as fast as USB2 than it's a Win already!
But I'm sure it will be much much faster than that!!!
:pimp:
#19
Mussels
Moderprator
USB 2.0 is rated at 480Mb. Divide by 8 and you get 60MB.

Because its a retarded speed measurement like wireless networking, you get half of that, 30MB/s.

If USB 3.0 is 10x the speed like they say, that means that you're still getting 250-300MB/s... who can argue with that?

Moto666: powered E-sata does exist. its just rare for some reason.
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#20
DanishDevil
Maybe powered eSATA is rare because of pressure from the guys behind USB 3.0...
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#22
Baum
@Mussels
Klick

Seems like Vista has some streaming priori sing function for streaming media

as i know Mcshissle does any one know if this priority only goes to Media Player? Then i would disable it as i use vlc and other 3rd party Media Player +Pidgin ect.
Posted on Reply
#23
Mussels
Moderprator
by: Baum
@Mussels
Klick

Seems like Vista has some streaming priori sing function for streaming media

as i know Mcshissle does any one know if this priority only goes to Media Player? Then i would disable it as i use vlc and other 3rd party Media Player +Pidgin ect.
AHAH. i'd noticed the network performance going to shit the second audio was in use, but i wasnt aware a fix had been found!

:toast:

I owe you one for this.
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#24
Hayder_Master
now the USB 3.0 speed is 5Gb that's mean same speed of PCI-E 2.0 , but i see there is an USB 3.0 control use PCI-e x1 , so is that can handle this much of speed
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#25
Mussels
Moderprator
by: hayder.master
now the USB 3.0 speed is 5Gb that's mean same speed of PCI-E 2.0 , but i see there is an USB 3.0 control use PCI-e x1 , so is that can handle this much of speed
PCI-E 1x 1.1 is limited to 125MB/s a second each way. Some people call that 250MB/s, but its wrong.

For a USB 3.0 port to run at 600MB/s, it would need to have 4 lanes of PCI-E 1.1 bandwidth for each port on the card. so that means a PCI-E 16x card could have 4x ports on it.

While most consumer motherboards have PCI-E 2.0 for the graphics cards slots, the extra 1x and 4x slots tend to run at the 1.1 standard.

USB3.0 wont be so hot in add-in cards - it'll utterly destroy USB2.0, but it wont show its potential until its integrated into the motherboards directly, and has access to more PCI-E lanes.
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