News Posts matching "Maxwell"

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NVIDIA Moving Around the Fabled GeForce GTX TITAN II

NVIDIA is moving around engineering samples of what it describes as "GM200 A1 graphics processor," in its shipping manifest. The sample was making its way from Taiwan, to Bangalore, India, from where it's likely pushed to the company's facilities in Bangalore and Hyderabad. A1 steppings of NVIDIA chips are usually pre-production, and bound for just a few more rounds of testing, before being upgraded to "A2" and mass-produced. German tech site 3DCenter.org also pulled out some likely specifications from its sources.

To begin with, the GM200, like the GM204, will be built on existing 28 nm silicon fabrication process, as both NVIDIA and AMD appear to have suffered design setbacks due to their common foundry partner, TSMC, not being able to set its next-gen 20 nm node up to speed in time. The GM200 is expected to feature over 4,000 CUDA cores, although the exact number is unknown. It is expected to widen the memory bus to 512-bit. Given the existing process, the GPU will be huge. Over 600 mm² huge. NVIDIA will probably bank on the energy efficiency of its "Maxwell" architecture to cope with thermal loads put out by a chip that big. The GM200-based "GeForce GTX TITAN II" could launch in the first half of 2015.

Source: 3DCenter.org

Eurocom Announces Shark 3 Notebook

Parents want the best for their kids, and with Eurocom's line of fully upgradable laptops you can build a laptop that will last throughout their education while saving with Eurocom's education program. Within the next few months' students will be visiting their prospective post-secondary institutions, compiling their list of wants and needs for the coming school year. Though parents want to give their children everything they need but often left to compromise on price and choose practicality. Eurocom targets both side of the equation by offering a ten percent discount on all its customizable and upgradable notebooks through its Eurocom Education Discount Program.

Eurocom ultraportable notebooks are small on size, but big on performance. All notebooks have standard upgrade possibilities like memory and storage, but it is their ability to have the processor upgraded that sets them apart. Eurocom offers thousands of customizable options on each laptop. "Parents like the practicality of Eurocom notebooks, students like the power of Eurocom notebooks", explains Mark Bialic, Eurocom president. "If you buy a notebook from Eurocom as a high school graduation gift, it's built to last past University graduation."

Is This the First Picture of GeForce GTX 880?

Chinese tech publication MyDrivers posted what it claims to be a graphics board running NVIDIA's next-generation GM204 graphics chip, which is designed to succeed the GK104, as the company's next workhorse GPU, covering a wide range of price-points. The pre-production graphics board usually has all its components placed (some redundant), to test out the best combination of them on production boards. Right away you see the purported GM204 chip, which looks bigger than the GK104, flanked by eight memory chips on three sides (reinforcing the 256-bit wide memory interface theory). The GM204 silicon is based on NVIDIA's "Maxwell" architecture, and is rumored to feature 3,200 CUDA cores, and about 4 GB of memory across a 256-bit wide memory interface. It is widely rumored to be built on the current 28 nm silicon fab process. NVIDIA could launch the first products running this chip before X'mas.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 880 and GTX 870 to Launch This Q4

NVIDIA is planning to launch its next high performance single-GPU graphics cards, the GeForce GTX 880 and GTX 870, no later than Q4-2014, in the neighborhood of October and November, according to a SweClockers report. The two will be based on the brand new "GM204" silicon, which most reports suggest, is based on the existing 28 nm silicon fab process. Delays by NVIDIA's principal foundry partner TSMC to implement its next-generation 20 nm process has reportedly forced the company to design a new breed of "Maxwell" based GPUs on the existing 28 nm process. The architecture's good showing with efficiency on the GeForce GTX 750 series probably gave NVIDIA hope. When 20 nm is finally smooth, it wouldn't surprise us if NVIDIA optically shrinks these chips to the new process, like it did to the G92 (from 65 nm to 55 nm). The GM204 chip is rumored to feature 3,200 CUDA cores, 200 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface. It succeeds the company's current workhorse chip, the GK104.

Source: SweClockers

Alienware Alpha Gaming Mini PC Announced

Dell's Alienware division has previously confirmed working on a Steam Machine and now the fruits of that work have entered the spotlight at E3. Alienware Alpha is a Steam Machine-like Mini PC that is designed for living room gaming without actually utilizing Valve's Steam OS or its (delayed) Steam Controller.

Alpha comes with Windows 8.1 pre-installed and makes use of a Console-mode UI allowing users easy access to Steam Big Picture. The system will be bundled with an Xbox 360 controller and will have a base price tag of $549. For that amount you get an Intel Core i3 (Haswell) processor, 4 GB of DDR3-1600 memory, a 2 GB NVIDIA Maxwell-based graphics card (GTX 750 Ti maybe?), and a 500 GB hard drive. Higher-priced configurations include Core i5/i7 processors, 8 GB of RAM, and 1/2 TB HDDs.

Eurocom Launches the Shark 3 15.6-Inch Notebook

Eurocom launches the Shark 3 for mobile users looking for an upgradeable, secure system with high performance NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M graphics and 5.5 TB of RAIDable storage.

The Shark 3 is the newest addition to the Eurocom line of lightweight notebooks. It supports high performance NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M graphics, 4th Gen Intel Core i7 processors and up to four storage drives for an abundance of options in storage capacity, performance and redundancy.

AMD Readies 28 nm "Tonga" to Take on GM107

NVIDIA's energy-efficiency leap achieved on existing 28 nanometer process, using the "Maxwell" based GM107, appears to have rattled AMD. The company is reportedly attempting a super-efficient, 28 nm, mid-range chip of its own, codenamed "Tonga." The chip could power graphics cards that compete with the GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750. The chip is likely to be based on Graphics CoreNext 2.0 micro-architecture, the same one that drives "Hawaii," which means AMD isn't counting on the micro-architecture for efficiency gains. It could feature an evolution of PowerTune, which works closer to the metal than its existing implementation on "Hawaii." Other features could include Mantle, TrueAudio, and perhaps even XDMA CrossFire (no cables needed). The chip could be wired to up to 2 GB of memory.

Another equally plausible theory doing rounds is that "Tonga" could be a replacement to "Tahiti Pro," designed to compete with the GK104 at much lower power footprint (than "Tahiti"), so AMD could more effectively compete with the GeForce GTX 760. The chip could be similar in feature-set to "Tahiti," with a narrower memory bus (256-bit wide), but higher clock speeds to make up for it. If this theory holds true, then "Tonga" could disrupt both Tahiti Pro and "Curacao XT." Curacao XT (R9 270X) is designed to offer a value-conscious alternative to the $250 GTX 760. The R9 280 is competitive in performance, but takes a beating on the energy-efficiency front, and is also costlier to manufacture, due to the higher transistor count and four additional memory chips. We could hear more at Computex 2014.


Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GM204 and GM206 to Tape-Out in April, Products to Launch in Q4?

It looks like things are going horribly wrong at TSMC, NVIDIA and AMD's principal foundry partner, with its 20 nm manufacturing process, which is throwing a wrench into the works at NVIDIA, forcing it to re-engineer an entire lineup of "Maxwell" GPUs based on existing 28 nm process. Either that, or NVIDIA is confident of delivering an efficiency leap using Maxwell on existing/mature 28 nm process, and saving costs in the process. NVIDIA is probably drawing comfort from the excellent energy-efficiency demonstrated by its Maxwell-based GeForce GTX 750 series. According to a 3DCenter.org report, NVIDIA's next mainline GPUs, the GM204 and GM206, which will be built on the 28 nm process, and "Maxwell" architecture, will tape out later this month. Products based on the two, however, can't be expected before Q4 2014, as late as December, or even as late as January 2015.

GM204 succeeds GK104 as the company's next workhorse performance-segment silicon, which could power graphics card SKUs ranging all the way from US $250 to $500. An older report suggests that it could feature as many as 3,200 CUDA cores. The GM204 could be taped out in April 2014, and the first GeForce products based on it could launch no sooner than December 2014. The GM206 is the company's next mid-range silicon, which succeeds GK106. It will tape out in April, alongside the GM204, but products based on it will launch only in January 2015. The GM200 is a different beast altogether. There's no mention of which process the chip will be based on, but it will succeed the GK110, and should offer performance increments worthy of being a successor. For that, it has to be based on the 20 nm process. It will tape-out in June 2014, and products based on it will launch only in or after Q2 2015.Source: 3DCenter.org

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 880 Detailed

NVIDIA's next-generation GeForce GTX 880 graphics card is shaping up to be a true successor to the GTX 680. According to a Tyden.cz report, GTX 880 will be based on NVIDIA's GM204 silicon, which ranks within its product stack in the same way GK104 does to the GeForce "Kepler" family. It won't be the biggest chip based on the "Maxwell" architecture, but will have what it takes to outperform even the GK110, again, in the same way GK104 outperforms GF110. The DirectX 12-ready chip will feature an SMM (streaming multiprocessor Maxwell) SIMD design that's identical to that of the GeForce GTX 750 Ti, only there are more SMMs, spread across multiple graphics processing clusters (GPCs), probably cushioned by a large slab of cache.
This is what the GTX 880 is shaping up to be.

Leadtek Announces GTX 750 Ti OC and GTX 750 OC Graphics Cards

Leadtek simultaneously launches GTX 750 Ti OC and GTX 750 OC, two brand-new GeForce series overclocking graphics cards. They are equipped with the first generation NVIDIA Maxwell GPU architecture, and their main appeal is low power consumption. Their capabilities have also been improved, compared to products of the same grade in the previous generation.

GTX 750 Ti OC and GTX 750 OC are equipped with 2 GB GDDR5 and 1 GB GDDR5, respectively. Their memory bandwidth is 128-bit. GTX 750 Ti OC is embedded with 640 CUDA cores and its base clock is 1072 MHz, allowing it to support Boost 2.0 technology to 1150 MHz, overclocking more than 5%, offering better performance and excellent cooling effects, and giving more choices to professional gamers.

EVGA Announces GeForce GTX 750 FTW 2GB

EVGA announced an Amazon-exclusive 2 GB variant of its GeForce GTX 750 FTW graphics card (model: 02G-P4-2758-KR). Built in an identical board design to the original GTX 750 FTW, with the company's ACX cooling solution, the card offers factory-overclocked speeds of 1229 MHz core, 1320 MHz GPU Boost, and 5012 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory, and features 2 GB of it across the chip's 128-bit wide memory interface. The cooling solution is designed to deal with much bigger chips, and should keep the GTX 750 quiet and comfy, even at its maker-given speeds. Based on the 28 nm GM107 silicon, the GTX 750 packs 512 CUDA cores, and is based on NVIDIA's new "Maxwell" GPU architecture. The card is priced at US $149.99.

NVIDIA Outlines Support Plans for its DirectX 10 Generation GPUs

With its next-generation "Maxwell" GPUs on the horizon, NVIDIA is preparing plans to gradually retire the GeForce 8 series, 9 series, and 200 series from its mainline driver support model. The GPUs make up NVIDIA's DirectX 10 generation, and include some iconic models, such as the 8800 GTX, the 8800 GT, the 9600 GT, and the GTX 260. The upcoming GeForce Release 340 driver will be the last to support these GPU series alongside its newer DirectX 11 generations, such as "Fermi," "Kepler," and "Maxwell." The driver that succeeds it, R343, will drop support for the older DirectX 10 generation.

With the R340 release, the DirectX 10 generation will be market "legacy." The lot will see continued support under R340 till April 2016. Whenever there's a glaring bug or security hole to address for the older GPUs, NVIDIA may ship out an R340 version (340.xx), but the GPUs will not get planned driver updates, unlike the "current" DirectX 11 generation. Support cycles are hence different from production cycle. A GeForce GTX 480, for example, may be "EOL" (end of life) in terms of its production cycle, but is still "current" in terms of its support cycle.

Source: NVIDIA

Razer Blade Pro Notebook Updated With Faster Graphics

Razer, the world leader in entertainment devices and software, today announced it has enhanced its award-winning Razer Blade Pro laptop with next-generation graphics capabilities and a suite of new applications designed for professionals and gamers.

At the heart of the Blade Pro is a full-HD, 17-inch LED main display working in-tandem with the award-winning Razer Switchblade User Interface (SBUI), the latter of which provides users with one-click access to program tools, macros, key binds and other customizable functions, as well as full Internet capabilities independent of the main display. Features of the Razer SBUI include 10 dynamic adaptive tactile keys, a cell phone-grade LCD display that doubles as a track pad, and associated proprietary software.

Leadtek Launches Its GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 Graphics Cards

Leadtek simultaneously launches GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750, two brand-new GeForce series graphics cards. They are equipped with the first generation NVIDIA Maxwell GPU architecture, and their main appeal is low power consumption. Their capabilities have also been improved, compared to products of the same grade in the previous generation.

GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 are equipped with 2 GB GDDR5 and 1 GB GDDR5, respectively. Their memory bandwidth is 128-bit. GTX 750 Ti is embedded with 640 CUDA cores and its base clock is 1020 MHz, allowing it to support Boost 2.0 technology to 1085 MHz. Leadtek will soon launch the single-fan overclocking and dual-fan Hurricane overclocking graphics cards made in-house, offering better performance and superb cooling effects, and giving more choices to professional gamers.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M Detailed

NVIDIA slipped out the first mobile GPU based on its GM107 silicon, the GeForce GTX 860M, which was spotted on the forumscape. The GTX 860M is configured identically to the desktop GTX 750 Ti, featuring the chip's full complement of 640 CUDA cores, 40 TMUs, 16 ROPs, and a 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 2 GB of memory. The core is clocked at 540 MHz, and the memory at 5.00 GHz (GDDR5 effective).

The mobile MXM card was put through a battery of synthetic tests, in which it was found to be twice as fast as its predecessor, the GTX 660M. In 3DMark 11 (performance preset), it scored P5339, compared to the P2563 points scored by the GTX 660M. In 3DMark 11 (extreme preset), the story is similar, with the GTX 860M scoring X1662, compared to the X774 scored by the GTX 660M.


Source: NotebookReview Forums

KFA2 Launches the GTX 750TI OC and GTX 750 OC Graphics Cards

KFA2, a leading manufacturer of the world's highest performing graphics cards, announced today the KFA2 GeForce GTX 750 Ti OC 2 GB and GTX 750 OC 1 GB - the 1st graphics cards built with the latest cutting-edge Maxwell GPU architecture.  The KFA2 GTX 750 OC is armed with an impressive 512 CUDA cores and 1 GB of GDDR5 at 5 GHz, while the KFA2 GTX 750 Ti OC is fully loaded for even more intense hi-res gaming with 640 cores and 2 GB of 5.4 GHz GDDR5 ram. Both cards are factory overclocked more than 100 MHz beyond stock speeds.

The new hyper-efficient architecture reduces power usage to a fraction of that in previous generations, both the GTX 750 OC and GTX 750 Ti OC include support for the most advanced new gaming technologies such as NVIDIA G-Sync, ShadowPlay, and PC Streaming through NVIDIA SHIELD.

Digital Storm Also Offering NVIDIA's GTX 750 (Ti) and GTX TITAN Black Cards

Digital Storm is excited to offer NVIDIA's highly anticipated GTX 750 and GTX 750Ti mainstream graphics cards and NVIDIA's new flagship TITAN BLACK - the fastest graphics card in the world. The three cards all allow Digital Storm customers to take their gaming to the next level with HD gaming at 1080P and Ultra HD 4K gaming respectively.

"HD gaming is the new standard and Ultra HD is not far behind with 4K displays already available for $800," said Rajeev Kuruppu, Digital Storm's Director of Product Development. "This is an exciting time for gamers and we're thrilled to incorporate NVIDIA's new cards into our systems to deliver the stunning graphics and advanced gaming experience our customers demand."

TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.7.7 Released

TechPowerUp rolled out the version 0.7.7 of GPU-Z, the popular graphics sub-system information, monitoring, and diagnostic utility. Hot on the heels of the previous version, the latest version adds a handful new features, support for new GPUs, and fixes a few bugs and inaccuracies. To begin with, GPU-Z 0.7.7 improves support for GPUs based on NVIDIA's "Maxwell" GPU architecture. The CUDA core and TMU counts on upcoming GTX 750 and 750 Ti should correct now. Support for CHiL 8214 voltage controller is improved, for cards running AMD's "Curacao" and "Pitcairn" graphics processors. Along the way, GPU-Z 0.7.7 adds support for NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M, Tesla K20Xm, and AMD Radeon HD 8210.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.7.7 | GPU-Z 0.7.7 with ASUS ROG skin

The change-log follows.

GM107 Features 128 CUDA Cores Per Streaming Multiprocessor

NVIDIA's upcoming GM107 GPU, the first to be based on its next-generation "Maxwell" GPU architecture, reportedly features a different arrangement of CUDA cores and streaming multiprocessors to those typically associated with "Kepler," although the component hierarchy is similar. The chip reportedly features five streaming multiprocessors, highly integrated computation subunits of the GPU. NVIDIA is referring to these parts as "streaming multiprocessor (Maxwell)," or SMMs.

Further, each streaming multiprocessor features 128 CUDA cores, and not the 192 CUDA cores found in SMX units of "Kepler" GPUs. If true, GM107 features 640 CUDA cores, all of which will be enabled on the GeForce GTX 750 Ti. If NVIDIA is carving out the GTX 750 by disabling one of those streaming multiprocessors, its CUDA core count works out to be 512. NVIDIA will apparently build two GPUs on the existing 28 nm process, the GM107, and the smaller GM108; and three higher performing chips on the next-generation 20 nm process, the GM206, the GM204, and the GM200. The three, as you might have figured out, succeed the GK106, GK104, and GK110, respectively.


Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GM107 "Maxwell" Silicon Pictured

Here is the first picture of a couple of NVIDIA GM107 silicons in a tray, ahead of graphics card assembly. The packages appear to be as big as those of the GK106 from the previous generation, however, the die itself is estimated to be smaller, at roughly 156 mm², compared to the 221 mm² die of the GK106, and the 118 mm² of the GK107. The best part? All three chips are built on the same 28 nm silicon fab process. So what makes the GM107 die smaller than that of the GK106 despite having a similar feature-set? Narrower memory bus. The GM107 is said to feature a 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, in comparison to the 192-bit wide interface of the GK106.

Apart from the 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, the GM107 is said to feature a total of 960 CUDA cores, 80 TMUs, and 16 ROPs. The CUDA core count is identical to that of the GK106. The GM107 is built on NVIDIA's next-generation "Maxwell" GPU architecture. It will form the foundation of two SKUs, the GeForce GTX 750 Ti, and the GeForce GTX 750. The former features the full complement of 960 CUDA cores; while the latter is slightly cut down, and features just 768. The TDP of the GTX 750 Ti is approximated to be around 75 Watt. If true, the GTX 750 duo will set new standards on the performance-per-Watt metrics. NVIDIA is expected to launch both, later this month.


Source: VideoCardz

GeForce GTX 750 Ti Benchmarked Some More

In the run up to its rumored February 18th launch, GeForce GTX 750 Ti, the first retail GPU based on NVIDIA's next-generation "Maxwell" GPU architecture, the card is finding itself in the hands of more leaky PC enthusiasts, this time, members of Chinese PC enthusiast community site PCOnline. The site used an early driver to test the GTX 750 Ti, which it put through 3DMark 11 (performance preset) and 3DMark Fire Strike. In the former, the card scored P4188 points, and 3170 points in the latter. The test-bed details are not mentioned, but one can make out a stock Core i7-4770K from one of the screenshots. Also accompanying the two is an alleged GPU-Z 0.7.5 screenshot of the GTX 750 Ti, which reads out its CUDA core count as 960. Version 0.7.5 doesn't support GTX 750 Ti, but it has fall-backs that help it detect unknown GPUs, particularly from NVIDIA. Its successor, GPU-Z 0.7.6, which we're releasing later today, comes with support for the chip.

Source: PCOnline.com.cn Forums

ASUS GeForce GTX 750 Ti "Maxwell" Sees First Listing

Way ahead of its rumored February 18 launch, a Hungarian online retailer listed an ASUS-branded GeForce GTX 750 Ti graphics card, bearing model number GTX750TI-OC-2GD5. The card is listed at a tax-inclusive price of 50,000 HUF (around US $225), which is rather steep, even for a pre-order, given the positioning of the card, in relation to existing products, such as the GTX 660 and GTX 760. The naming suggests that the card is factory-overclocked, which means that NVIDIA will allow factory-overclocked, and possibly custom design GTX 750 Ti cards from day-one. It also gives away the memory of the card, at 2 GB GDDR5. The listing, however, doesn't go with any pictures.

Source: Tech2.hu

GeForce GTX 750 Ti "Maxwell" First Performance Numbers Out

Ahead of its rumored mid-February launch, members of Taiwanese tech forum Coolaler.com posted the first performance benchmark numbers of the card. Originally thought to be positioned between the previous-generation GeForce GTX 660 and current GTX 760, the GTX 750 Ti, according to these numbers is on average 10 to 15 percent slower than the GTX 660, which should put its performance somewhere in between the GTX 650 Ti Boost and the GTX 660.

Then again, the testers must be using some very early drivers, and performance figures of the GTX 750 Ti should get clearer as its mid-February launch date approaches. The GeForce GTX 750 Ti is an important GPU for NVIDIA, as it's the first to be based on its next-generation "Maxwell" GPU micro-architecture. NVIDIA is trying the architecture out on current 28 nm process, before launching bigger chips based on the next-generation 20 nm fab process.


Source: Coolaler

NVIDIA Readies GeForce GTX 750 Ti Based on "Maxwell"

NVIDIA's next-generation GPU architecture, codenamed "Maxwell," will debut this February, with the unexpectedly positioned GeForce GTX 750. The card will launch on February 18, to be specific. Maxwell will introduce a host of new features for NVIDIA, beginning with Unified Virtual Memory. The feature lets the GPU and CPU share the same memory. Such a feature is already implemented on the current CUDA, but Maxwell could be designed to reduce overhead involved in getting the thing to work. The next big feature is that Maxwell GPUs will embed a 64-bit ARM CPU core based on NVIDIA's "Project Denver." This CPU core will allow the GPU to reduce dependency on the system's main processor in certain GPGPU scenarios. Pole-vaulting the CPU's authority in certain scenarios could work to improve performance

Getting back to the GeForce GTX 750 Ti, NVIDIA's aim is simple, to see how "Maxwell" performs on the existing, proven 28 nanometer silicon fab process, before scaling it up on the future 20 nm nodes, with bigger chips. Given its name, we expect it to be positioned in between the GTX 760 and the GTX 660 in terms of gaming performance, but we won't be surprised if it falls into an entirely different league with GPGPU. There are no specifications at hand.

Source: SweClockers

NVIDIA Updates GPU Roadmap with "Volta"

NVIDIA updated its GPU micro-architecture roadmap at the 2013 GPU Technology Conference (GTC). Currently spearheaded by the "Kepler" micro-architecture, which drives its GeForce, Quadro, and Tesla product lines, and which will drive Tegra mobile SoCs in 2014; NVIDIA's next-generation "Maxwell" could make its debut some time in 2014. Going by NVIDIA's graph that puts performance-per-Watt against time, "Maxwell" should nearly double performance. Maxwell GPUs feature unified virtual memory, which lets CPUs treat graphics card memory as system memory, for faster general-purpose performance.

Although not backed by a tentative launch year, and assuming "Maxwell" has its run for another two years, 2016 could see the launch of NVIDIA's "Volta" GPU micro-architecture. In addition to advancements by its predecessors, "Volta" could introduce stacked DRAM technology. It would enable GPU memory bandwidths as high as 1 TB/s. Current high-end graphics cards such as GeForce Titan and Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition, are capable of breaching the 300 GB/s mark, so NVIDIA's claims don't sound far-fetched.

Source: NVIDIA
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