Tuesday, May 25th 2010

NVIDIA Releases GeForce GTX 480M, World's Fastest Notebook GPU

NVIDIA made its GeForce GTX 480M GPU official today. The DirectX 11 compliant GPU is based on the GF100 core and packs all the features of its desktop counterpart, such as decentralized hardware tessellation, next-generation CUDA and DirectCompute 5.0. The GF100 core has a configuration similar to the GeForce GTX 465 desktop GPU. It has three of its four graphics processing clusters (GPCs), and 11 out of 16 streaming multiprocessors (SMs) enabled, giving a CUDA core count of 352. To reduce the overall board footprint, the GPU makes do with a 256-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, with 1 GB of memory.

To make keep up with the electrical constraints of notebooks, the GTX 480M uses much lower clock-speeds than any desktop product that uses GF100. The core is clocked at 425 MHz, shader domain at 850 MHz, and memory at 600 MHz (real) or 2.40 GHz (effective), which gives a memory bandwidth of 76.8 GB/s. As mentioned earlier, the full feature-set of its desktop counterparts is packed with the GTX 480M, including support for NVIDIA 3D Vision, PureVideo HD, PhysX, and CUDA. It can pair with up to two boards of its kind in 2-way SLI. Constraints of the notebook form-factor won't allow any more boards, anyway. The GPU is open to Notebook manufacturers to plan their designs around. NVIDIA claims the GTX 480M to be the fastest notebook GPU. It finds direct competition in the ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870, which is based on the 800 stream processor-laden Juniper core.
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55 Comments on NVIDIA Releases GeForce GTX 480M, World's Fastest Notebook GPU

#1
MrMilli
Benetanegia said:
Jarred's view is like mine:

And in one of the comments:

If you actually read what you linked, they expect as much as a 75% performance increase over previous generation. I didn't expect as much, but I do expect more than the ~25% increase you were saying (15% on top of the 10% dif between 285M and RM 5870), something like 40% average.

They do not mention 100w being imposible or going to fry anything. 100w is high, but nowhere near anything to worry about when the laptop is plugged to the grid. 285 SLI is much harder to cool and power and many laptop designs exist with this config. Mobility Radeon 4870 X2 laptops exist too and they too consume much more than 480M...

BTW I forgot to mention this in the last post, but how much % of laptops come with 180w AC adapters according to you? You know they exist right?
The difference between the 285M and 5870 is not 10%, it's more like 20%. (btw you can't just add up percentages like normal numbers)
Jared says 15% faster than a 5870, just like i said.

I never said it's not possible to have a laptop with such a high power usage. I said it's crazy.
I really don't see the point of a 8kg laptop. Why do they even call it a laptop. Anybody crazy enough to put one of these on their lap is going to be sterile afterwards.
Some people mentioned LAN parties but i think a game system built in a micro-ATX case is much more efficient.

And you reference to multi GPU configs to be as power hungry. True, but it's easier to implement efficient cooling of two separate 50W GPU's instead of one 100W GPU in a laptop.
If you check out something like an Alienware laptop with multi-GPU, you'll see that they put the two MXM modules far from eachother. Each being cooled by a separate cooler and heatsink. It's becomes a bigger problem when all this heat is coming from one spot (in a laptop i mean).

As you see in Anand's post, there won't be an Optimus enabled GTX480M laptop.
So what advantage does it hold over a 5870X2 setup? Because that's what i keep refering to and that's what you keep dismissing. Same money, same heat, no battery life but faster.
If you want the fastest, no matter the weight, then that would be the 5870X2.
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#2
trt740
allot of bias here wow!!! How about we buy the best product and move on and leave the bias behind.
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#3
Benetanegia
MrMilli said:
Jared says 15% faster than a 5870, just like i said.
Read again he says GTX480 is faster than HD5870, desktop parts! No comparison between RM 5870 and GTX480M. He later says there's a 25% difference between this next generation's low-end Fermi (meaning GTX470, again desktop) and GTX285 (desktop) and 75% between high-end Fermi (that is GTX480) and GTX285, and... he expects similar differences from GTX480M versus GTX285M. So he expects 75% difference with GTX285M. Like I said, I do not think it's going to be as high.
On the desktop, the additional shader performance does appear to be the main reason NVIDIA is ahead of AMD, with an average lead of around 15% at high resolutions. In DX11 titles, the lead is often even greater, coming in at 20 to 25% faster.
If we look at the desktop GTX 480, we can see that even with less texture fill rate and only slightly more memory bandwidth, the other architectural changes resulted in a performance increase ranging from 20% at the low end to as much as 75%, with the average being around 50% faster. We would expect a similar performance increase with the GTX 480M compared to the previous generation 285M. Given that the mobile HD 5870 is only slightly faster on average than the GTX 280M, it looks like NVIDIA is set to retake the mobile performance crown.
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#4
Bjorn_Of_Iceland
Fourstaff said:
I wouldn't feast on my own nuts, thx
I knew that. yum yum
Posted on Reply
#5
Wile E
Power User
MrMilli said:
The difference between the 285M and 5870 is not 10%, it's more like 20%. (btw you can't just add up percentages like normal numbers)
Jared says 15% faster than a 5870, just like i said.

I never said it's not possible to have a laptop with such a high power usage. I said it's crazy.
I really don't see the point of a 8kg laptop. Why do they even call it a laptop. Anybody crazy enough to put one of these on their lap is going to be sterile afterwards.
Some people mentioned LAN parties but i think a game system built in a micro-ATX case is much more efficient.

And you reference to multi GPU configs to be as power hungry. True, but it's easier to implement efficient cooling of two separate 50W GPU's instead of one 100W GPU in a laptop.
If you check out something like an Alienware laptop with multi-GPU, you'll see that they put the two MXM modules far from eachother. Each being cooled by a separate cooler and heatsink. It's becomes a bigger problem when all this heat is coming from one spot (in a laptop i mean).

As you see in Anand's post, there won't be an Optimus enabled GTX480M laptop.
So what advantage does it hold over a 5870X2 setup? Because that's what i keep refering to and that's what you keep dismissing. Same money, same heat, no battery life but faster.
If you want the fastest, no matter the weight, then that would be the 5870X2.
ATI drivers in crossfire have been pretty bad for a while now. And while the 480 performs slower, it has CUDA at it's disposal. I could go either way. Both are good choices in my eyes.
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