Monday, December 30th 2013

ThermoLab GOYO CPU Cooler Pictured

ThermoLab, of the BARAM and BADA fame, posted pictures of its next CPU heatsink, named GOYO. This tower-type heatsink may look big in the pictures, but measures just 125 mm x 70 mm x 135 mm, weighing in at just 290 g. It features just 15 asymmetrically shaped aluminium fins, arranged along three 6 mm-thick copper heat pipes that make direct contact with the CPU at the base. Thermolab claims that the GOYO should be able to handle thermal loads of up to 60W fan-less. It can hold on to a pair of 120 mm fans. With its fans installed, the heatsink can handle chips with TDP of up to 95W. The cooler can handle most modern CPU socket types, including LGA1150/LGA1155, AM3+ and FM2+. Thermolab didn't finalize pricing or availability of the GOYO. Find a quick cooling performance preview at the source.
Sources: Parkoz, FanlessTech
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16 Comments on ThermoLab GOYO CPU Cooler Pictured

#1
player-x
I like the looks, but dont think it will preform wel, as it only uses 6mm heatpipes, next to that the spacing between the plate's is huge compared to top coolers, also there are gapes between the heatpipe filled with aluminum on the contact surface.

Cool looking cooler but properly a under preformer that i would only use for its looks
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#2
Animalpak
Painting fins is not good. The paint is a obstacle for the heat.
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#3
player-x
"Animalpak said:
Painting fins is not good. The paint is a obstacle for the heat.
Looks like anodized aluminum, so that not a real problem, and even if its pain the insulating value will be extreme low.
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#4
ensabrenoir
Looks like a Tuniq Tower 120 extreme.... that some one cut in half....
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#5
vega22
"player-x said:
Looks like anodized aluminum, so that not a real problem, and even if its pain the insulating value will be extreme low.
then on top it is matt black which transfers heat better than any colour.

heatpipes will be its biggest issue. 3 6mm pipes will not be able to remove the heat from the latest hot running cpu.
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#6
chodaboy19
The paint or anodizing increases the surface area to help dissipate heat actually.
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#7
Nordic
Look at the fin density on it. This is not a high performance cooler. I bet this is silence oriented. It says fans meaning it needs more than one. They also only say up to 95w. Not a performance cooler for sure.
Posted on Reply
#8
player-x
"chodaboy19 said:
The paint or anodizing increases the surface area to help dissipate heat actually.
No it dose not at least not really measurable, as the coating is so thin you need really specialized measuring tools before you can tell the difference.
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#9
hellrazor
"player-x said:
as the coating is so thin you need really specialized measuring tools before you can tell the difference.
Like, say, eyes?
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#10
player-x
"hellrazor said:
Like, say, eyes?
You have very very special eyes then! :eek:

Cyborg eyes from the future?, that can see and measure a few microns thickness, that i cant even measure with my caliper.
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#11
micropage7
"player-x said:
You have very very special eyes then! :eek:

Cyborg eyes from the future?, that can see and measure a few microns thickness, that i cant even measure with my caliper.
i dont think difference some micron coating would give different temp. Its too thin to affect cooler performance
and its like the other cooler, just have fins variation
Posted on Reply
#12
hellrazor
"player-x said:
You have very very special eyes then! :eek:

Cyborg eyes from the future?, that can see and measure a few microns thickness, that i cant even measure with my caliper.
Maybe, but I seriously doubt your caliper would be nearly as useful.
Posted on Reply
#13
SteveS45
"player-x said:
Looks like anodized aluminum, so that not a real problem, and even if its pain the insulating value will be extreme low.
There's a big problem with anodized aluminum, soldering zinc does not stick on to the anodized layer so you end up having to use aluminum paste for soldering. Aluminum paste in comparison does not perform as well as zinc based paste. So it depends if the performance hit can be offset by other features such as a stronger fan or more surface area.
Posted on Reply
#14
SteveS45
"chodaboy19 said:
The paint or anodizing increases the surface area to help dissipate heat actually.
Actually no...
First of all how would adding a layer of material add on to the surface area? Surface area is strictly the total area of the fins. Paint does little to increase or decrease performance actually, wither you use thermal specialized paint or not.
Posted on Reply
#15
player-x
"SteveS45 said:
There's a big problem with anodized aluminum, soldering zinc does not stick on to the anodized layer.
Actually there is no solder used between the aluminum and the copper heatpipe, as the heatpipe gets pushed in to the smaller holes made in to the fins, and just the pressure of the stretched up aluminum is making the heat transfer better.


Look no soldering at all, really, no kidding, seriously, none at all. :wtf:
Want more proof, look here. :twitch:

"SteveS45 said:
Actually no...
Paint does little to increase or decrease performance actually, wither you use thermal specialized paint or not.
Actually Yes...

Heat gets transfered by infrared waves, and black is the best color that transfers that, just as a black surface absorb's more heat it also radiate it more if the source is gone.
Posted on Reply
#16
SteveS45
"player-x said:
Actually there is no solder used between the aluminum and the copper heatpipe, as the heatpipe gets pushed in to the smaller holes made in to the fins, and just the pressure of the stretched up aluminum is making the heat transfer better.


Look no soldering at all, really, no kidding, seriously, none at all. :wtf:
Want more proof, look here. :twitch:


Actually Yes...

Heat gets transfered by infrared waves, and black is the best color that transfers that, just as a black surface absorb's more heat it also radiate it more if the source is gone.
You're right about non soldering.
Didn't notice that it's using this type of manufacturing, which yes would mean that soldering is no longer a problem. However, performance will be greatly depend on their manufacturing process and seeing if they can keep the stacks tight through transport ect.

But back to infrared dissipation, I truly don't believe that coolers this size could benefit much from the black surface. Probably in a large scale pure passive heatsink for industrial machines. I'm guessing that if the black is as good as absorbing heat from the fins, it will also absorb heat within the PC chassis. The way that some thermal paints are designed, is to prevent external heat to enter the fins.
(That's what Phanteks says theirs does: http://phanteks.com/PH-TC14PE.html)
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