Thursday, October 3rd 2013

Apacer Announces the PT910 PCI-Express SSD

For professional gamers to win fierce fights easily, Apacer, the pioneer in digital storage, launches the latest SSD - Apacer PT910 SSD. It adopts the ultra-high-speed interfaces PCI-E 2.0 x 2, reaching amazing sequential read/write speeds of 830/790 MB/s and 4K random read/write speeds up to 100,000 IOPS.

With the dual controller from the top brand SandForce and the chips from the tech giant Intel, the product is available in 256 GB and 512 GB, of which the real capacities are 7% larger than other same-level products.PT910's multiple advantages of high efficiency, high reliability and high cost-performance ratio allow computer game experts, musicians and audio/video workers to enjoy a more pleasant and smooth digital experiences.
Breaking the interface limitations, reaching a read/write speed of 830/790 MB/s
Speed is an eternal pursuit for professional gamers. The Apacer PT910 PCI-E SSD, with PCI-E 2.0 x 2 high-speed interfaces, is compatible with the PCI-E x4/x8/x16 slot. It breaks the transmission limitations and reaches a sequential read/write speed of 830/790 MB/s and a 4K random read/write speed of up to 100,000 IOPS (Input/Output Per Second). Game downloading and execution can be completed in the blink of an eye. With its superior speed experience and excellent cost-performance, it will surely become the best choice for game players!

Capacity increasing by 7% than the same-level products, providing a high-speed experience and cost-efficiency
The PT910 PCI-E SSD is available in two capacities: 256 GB and 512 GB, which offer superior cost-performance surpassing products of the same type and level (240 GB, 480 GB) by nearly 7%. It provides a high-speed and smooth read/write experience for system work or start-up disk, playing computer games, or editing video and audio files. As a PT910 professional gamers, you are able to take a head start in the virtual world, while other gamers are still "loading" and "starting up".

The PT910 PCI-E SSD adopts a low profile design. Its flexibly applies to computer cases of different sizes and facilitates route setting and heat dissipation inside the cases. Moreover, the PT910 PCI-E SSD does not require any drivers installed before use. Its easy operations of installation and upgrading greatly satisfy professional gamers and DIY experts.

Stable and durable SSD with multiple security schemes
Reliability-wise, PT910 PCI-E SSD is built in with disk sector management, power disruption management and error-correcting mechanisms. The PCI-E interfaced solid state drive also supports Windows TRIM command to provide professional gamers a worry-free platform.
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16 Comments on Apacer Announces the PT910 PCI-Express SSD

#1
romeg
I use only one video card (Asus GTX 980) but I plan to add a second. This SSD looks like it could seriously interfere with that. The faster r/w are nice, but I think I'll stay with my Samsung 840 Pro SSDs as they don't require an expansion slot.
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#2
AsRock
TPU addict
Gamers lol, loading faster so fast you get to not to read those helpful hints in your game and once your playing it SSD is pretty pointless.

I raided my GT's up and they are hitting 950MBs and tell you the truth it's not worth doing.
Posted on Reply
#3
Disparia
Not all that special, but maybe it's priced well?

What I'd rather see is an M.2 adapter - three four lane M.2 ports that accept the 110mm sticks. I've drawn up this complete accurate schematic to save an engineer some time ;)

Posted on Reply
#4
utengineer
Jizzler said:
Not all that special, but maybe it's priced well?

What I'd rather see is an M.2 adapter - three four lane M.2 ports that accept the 110mm sticks. I've drawn up this complete accurate schematic to save an engineer some time ;)


Thanks. Done. Bricked. Declined ;)
Posted on Reply
#5
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
AsRock said:
Gamers lol, loading faster so fast you get to not to read those helpful hints in your game and once your playing it SSD is pretty pointless.

I raided my GT's up and they are hitting 950MBs and tell you the truth it's not worth doing.
People don't seem to realise the sequential read/writes aren't the main thing on an SSD. Everyone just assumes an SSD with 550 read/write is going to magically make everything load a million times faster. The real difference in terms of software comes from IOPS, and considering most single SSD's have almost 100,000 IOPS, and this magical PCIE monster only has 100,000 IOPS, it's not going to make a fat bit of difference besides a couple of extra seconds (literally a couple) shorter game loading times. And let's be frank, most games don't have long loading times these days, and in multiplayer it doesn't matter how fast you load, you still have to wait for everyone else.
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#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
AsRock said:
Gamers lol, loading faster so fast you get to not to read those helpful hints in your game and once your playing it SSD is pretty pointless.

I raided my GT's up and they are hitting 950MBs and tell you the truth it's not worth doing.
That has been my experience as well. It's that latency improvement you get from having an SSD over a conventional hard drive that reaps the most benefits. Bandwidth to mass storage very quickly has diminishing returns.

On a side note, what stripe size do you have on your GT RAID? I've played around with 128k and 4k and each have their benefits and down sides. I'm thinking of formatting soon and giving 16k or 32k a try instead to see how a middle ground fairs, because I get capped at about 850MB/s with 4k blocks but 128k will give me 1GB/s but is more harmful to random reads and writes.

Also in all seriousness, I don't feel a difference in responsiveness going from one to two in RAID-0. The only time I notice it is if I'm copying something huge, like a VM image.
RCoon said:
People don't seem to realise the read/writes aren't the main thing on an SSD. Everyone just assumes an SSD with 550 read/write is going to magically make everything load a million times faster. The real difference in terms of software comes from IOPS, and considering most single SSD's have almost 100,000 IOPS, and this magical PCIE monster only has 100,000 IOPS, it's not going to make a fat bit of difference besides a couple of extra seconds (literally a couple) shorter game loading times. And let's be frank, most games don't have long loading times these days, and in multiplayer it doesn't matter how fast you load, you still have to wait for everyone else.
Even IOPS eventually has diminishing returns because disk I/O is hardly the majority of what games are doing. It's just another way of making sure you make the disk less of a bottleneck than it already isn't. The bottom line is that all it might get you is a couple seconds off your load time, that's it.
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#7
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Marketed to "gamers" because nobody with a brain would buy this.
Posted on Reply
#8
The Von Matrices
Jizzler said:
Not all that special, but maybe it's priced well?

What I'd rather see is an M.2 adapter - three four lane M.2 ports that accept the 110mm sticks. I've drawn up this complete accurate schematic to save an engineer some time ;)
Why have three M.2 slots then bottleneck them with 4 lanes of uplink bandwidth? Why not have a PEX 8724 or a PEX 8732 so you can have 8 or 16 uplink lanes, respectively?
Posted on Reply
#9
AsRock
TPU addict
Aquinus said:
That has been my experience as well. It's that latency improvement you get from having an SSD over a conventional hard drive that reaps the most benefits. Bandwidth to mass storage very quickly has diminishing returns.

On a side note, what stripe size do you have on your GT RAID? I've played around with 128k and 4k and each have their benefits and down sides. I'm thinking of formatting soon and giving 16k or 32k a try instead to see how a middle ground fairs, because I get capped at about 850MB/s with 4k blocks but 128k will give me 1GB/s but is more harmful to random reads and writes.

Also in all seriousness, I don't feel a difference in responsiveness going from one to two in RAID-0. The only time I notice it is if I'm copying something huge, like a VM image.

Even IOPS eventually has diminishing returns because disk I/O is hardly the majority of what games are doing. It's just another way of making sure you make the disk less of a bottleneck than it already isn't. The bottom line is that all it might get you is a couple seconds off your load time, that's it.
The format of a single drive block wise can make it faster\slower you just have to know whats going on it. If it's games the 4k block can be a little slower on a HDD never seen the point in trying it with a SSD.

RCoon said:
People don't seem to realise the sequential read/writes aren't the main thing on an SSD. Everyone just assumes an SSD with 550 read/write is going to magically make everything load a million times faster. The real difference in terms of software comes from IOPS, and considering most single SSD's have almost 100,000 IOPS, and this magical PCIE monster only has 100,000 IOPS, it's not going to make a fat bit of difference besides a couple of extra seconds (literally a couple) shorter game loading times. And let's be frank, most games don't have long loading times these days, and in multiplayer it doesn't matter how fast you load, you still have to wait for everyone else.
Dam those internet people, who they think they are slowing others down.
Posted on Reply
#10
Disparia
The Von Matrices said:
Why have three M.2 slots then bottleneck them with 4 lanes of uplink bandwidth? Why not have a PEX 8724 or a PEX 8732 so you can have 8 or 16 uplink lanes, respectively?
Keep the price down? :)

Also, I was not sure that it would operate in that fashion. I know network switches do (ex: 1Gb with 10Gb uplink) but does PCIe design allow a PEX switch do the same? Nice if it did, especially for a card with more ports but I'd be happy with my adapter. Start with a single 512GB/1TB stick, then add 2TB (or greater) sticks when they're available. Performance is more than adequate for me (and most of the people in this thread, going by their comments).
Posted on Reply
#11
Assimilator
Seems this product is a few years too late, now that SATA Express and M.2 is here.
Posted on Reply
#12
ypsylon
One thing I don't get with such implementation of SSDs. With such small size they are pointless. Any classic SSD is far cheaper and more convenient to place pretty much anywhere you like - even can stick it with gaffer tape.

Classic PCI-Ex SSD at this moment in time are total waste of time. What Jizzler suggested is much more interesting and I've seen some stuff similar to that, although only for one M.2 not 3-4. I would buy such card immediately. Much more logical than cramming M.2 SSD on the motherboard itself, below all expansion cards where airflow is non-existent.
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#13
Easo
This seems kinda dissapointing...
Posted on Reply
#14
The Von Matrices
ypsylon said:
I would buy such card immediately. Much more logical than cramming M.2 SSD on the motherboard itself, below all expansion cards where airflow is non-existent.
What SSDs do you know of that need extra cooling?
Posted on Reply
#15
john_
This is just a PCIe card with two sata disks on it. Nothing really special. Apacer found a few cheap SSDs with sandforce controller and just put them on a PCIe card.



Maybe it would have been a good idea if they where selling that PCIe adapter alone for $30 for example, so that anyone with two identical SSDs build his own PCIe boot drive.
Posted on Reply
#16
KevinCobley
John's comments are fairly correct, the makers of these types of drives are ripping off the suckers buying them.
These things should be around the same prices as standard SSD's the express interface is only a handful of dollars seen plenty of Xpress x 4 devices under $100.
It's even easier to get the same speeds using MX100's in raid you can get a TB raid drive with the same speeds as express drives for under $500.
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