Wednesday, September 2nd 2015

Philips Monitors Brings the Era of Quantum Dot Monitors to Europe

MMD, the leading technology company and brand license partner for Philips Monitors and QD Vision have joined forces to bring the world's first quantum dot desktop monitor to Europe. The Philips 27" Full HD monitor (276E6ADS) delivers 99% Adobe RGB color thanks to Color IQ technology from QD Vision. Philips monitors will showcase the quantum dot monitor at IFA, Hall 22 Booth 101.

"Quantum dot technology is changing the way monitor users think about color, and the new 27" E Line monitor is the first on the market to showcase this new technology," said Stefan Sommer, Director Marketing & Business Management EMEA at MMD. "QD Vision is helping us create a monitor with 99% Adobe RGB color at a very aggressive price point, making it accessible to everyone who uses a monitor."
Even at the highest price points, most of today's monitors are only capable of displaying less than 95% of the Adobe RGB standard, with mainstream models typically only capable of presenting roughly 70% of the Adobe spectrum. Using QD Vision's Color IQ solution, we can now produce monitors that deliver the full Adobe RGB standard (>99%), but at much lower overall costs.

The new E line monitor with Color IQ is ideal for entertainment and gaming, as well as professional photography and design. The 276E6ADS combines Color IQ optics with full HD resolution, resulting in a professional-quality display at the price of mainstream desktop monitors.

"The superior color of our edge-lit quantum dots and our strong price-performance characteristics make them an ideal catalyst for positive disruption in the global monitor industry," said Matt Mazzuchi, Vice President, Market and Business Development at QD Vision. "Our close collaboration with Philips monitors brought this full gamut color monitor to European consumers."

The new E6 quantum dot monitor will be available in October 2015 in Europe
Add your own comment

24 Comments on Philips Monitors Brings the Era of Quantum Dot Monitors to Europe

#2
Assimilator
5DVX0130
27" @ 1080p
No thanks.
Exactly. 27" should be 1440p minimum or else there's no point.
Posted on Reply
#3
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
So what's quantum do point?
Posted on Reply
#4
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
What's the point of showcasing an image of it?
Posted on Reply
#5
McSteel
Frick
So what's quantum do point?
A Quantum Dot is a nano-scale semiconductor capable of emitting a narrow-band (nearly monochromatic) light when excited. The physical size of the dot determines its emission characteristic, such that larger dots emit redder light, and smaller ones shift to the blue end of the spectrum.

Now, I sincerely doubt the display panel used in the advertised monitor is actually utilizing electro-stimulated emissive QDs.
Instead, a cheaper way is to realize that QDs can be excited using incident light of a certain wavelength, which will make them re-emit light of a certain lower wavelength, and some heat to account for the energy difference.

This is usually done by using a standard blue LED and two QDs placed in front of it, each obscuring a third of the LED's emission surface. One QD is made in such as way as to re-emit green light when the LED shines on it, the other QD emits red light instead. This creates a B-GR LED-QD arrangement, producing white light.

QDs emit quite a saturated and relatively precise narrowband spectrum, so sometimes the red and the green QD will actually be a composite of several slightly smaller and slightly larger QDs, so as to cover more of the light spectrum. This directly influences the color gamut that can be achieved.

If someone was to use a complex backligth consisting of electro-stimulated QDs of various specific wavelengths (instead of an edge-lit with a light diffuser), a much wider gamut could be achieved, Of course, this would be that much more expensive, but someone, somewhere will make this for the photo editing pros.
Easy Rhino
What's the point of showcasing an image of it?
The image is intentionally highly saturated, to try to illustrate how QD-LED backlight has a high brightness and saturation factor.
Unless the manufacturer is very clever with backlight dimming and/or panel blinking, the blacks will be (not very) dark grays instead...
Posted on Reply
#6
cadaveca
My name is Dave
QD's were in audio, now video. Color me not surprised.
Posted on Reply
#7
Sony Xperia S
Once I was at Philips factory speaking with a manager who worked there. Do you know what he tried to convince me?

He aggressively asked me why I would prefer Philips products. Even he would stay away and use other company's monitors, as what actually they do there. :laugh:

Can you imagine that your company produces something and you use a competitor's products - in that case those were Dells or HPs?

People say that Philips is no longer the company it had been.
Posted on Reply
#8
Blue-Knight
Adobe RGB standard
Is that Adobe, the software company!?

Well, I did not know Adobe owns colors. What a joke.

You've just lost all your credibility. Rest in peace.

P.S. Not targeted at "btarunr".
Posted on Reply
#9
apoe
Blue-Knight
Is that Adobe, the software company!?

Well, I did not know Adobe owns colors. What a joke.

You've just lost all your credibility. Rest in peace.
Google 'Adobe RGB color space'....
Posted on Reply
#10
tabascosauz
Blue-Knight
Is that Adobe, the software company!?

Well, I did not know Adobe owns colors. What a joke.

You've just lost all your credibility. Rest in peace.

P.S. Not targeted at "btarunr".
If you don't know what you're talking about, don't talk about it at all. First it was SSDs, now it's Adobe RGB. Google is your friend.
Posted on Reply
#11
McSteel
Sony Xperia S
Once I was at Philips factory speaking with a manager who worked there. Do you know what he tried to convince me?

He aggressively asked me why I would prefer Philips products. Even he would stay away and use other company's monitors, as what actually they do there. :laugh:

Can you imagine that your company produces something and you use a competitor's products - in that case those were Dells or HPs?

People say that Philips is no longer the company it had been.
And then you realize that Dell monitors use LG.Display panels. LG.Display is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the LG.Philips, created in the merger of LG and Philips...
Of course the panel isn't everything. But in this case, Philips is showcasing a new panel backlight technology, which will directly impact what Philips' competitors will be able to produce. And while Philips themselves won't attach the best casing or the best OSD or the best firmware to that panel, the focus here is not on those other (important) aspects and capabilities.
Blue-Knight
Is that Adobe, the software company!?

Well, I did not know Adobe owns colors. What a joke.

You've just lost all your credibility. Rest in peace.

P.S. Not targeted at "btarunr".
Ever heard of Pantone? They don't own colors either. But they do index them and provide a means of unambiguously assigning specific values to specific colors. So does Adobe. And while CIE color spaces are the scientific norm, the industry norms such as AdobeRGB and, say, ISO Coated v2 are well-established and have become essential in development and manufacturing. After all, all standards such as ATX, PCI, USB were initially proposed by a company or group of companies. Traction and following gathered for them are a reflection of the standard's usability and market penetration. And AdobeRGB is as ubiquitous and relevant as they come.
Posted on Reply
#13
Sony Xperia S
McSteel
And then you realize that Dell monitors use LG.Display panels. LG.Display is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the LG.Philips, created in the merger of LG and Philips...
Of course the panel isn't everything. But in this case, Philips is showcasing a new panel backlight technology, which will directly impact what Philips' competitors will be able to produce. And while Philips themselves won't attach the best casing or the best OSD or the best firmware to that panel, the focus here is not on those other (important) aspects and capabilities.
Thanks for letting me know this. Now I will further distance myself from those brands.

Going to use PANASONIC only. ;)

My point was and stil is that people here, especially in big related forums, have opinions to stay away from Philips.

Philips is much worse than it used to be in the previous decades.
Posted on Reply
#14
Prima.Vera
I thought DELL was using Samsung panels...
Posted on Reply
#16
tabascosauz
Sony Xperia S
Thanks for letting me know this. Now I will further distance myself from those brands.

Going to use PANASONIC only. ;)

My point was and stil is that people here, especially in big related forums, have opinions to stay away from Philips.

Philips is much worse than it used to be in the previous decades.
LG display is less about Philips and more about LG. LG still makes stellar IPS panels (hardly any IPS panels are not made by them, look at HP, Dell, AOC and all those Korean brands).

I'm pretty sure that Philips sold all its shares in the joint venture some time ago.
Posted on Reply
#17
Sony Xperia S
tabascosauz
LG display is less about Philips and more about LG. LG still makes stellar IPS panels (hardly any IPS panels are not made by them, look at HP, Dell, AOC and all those Korean brands).

I'm pretty sure that Philips sold all its shares in the joint venture some time ago.
AOC i2369vm 1920 X 1080 has that LG panel but in this model Acer, the display beats it and is the best 'lower resolution' 1440 X 900 display I have seen:


Can you confirm which panel is inside Acer Aspire 7720 ?
Posted on Reply
#18
Nokiron
Blue-Knight
Is that Adobe, the software company!?

Well, I did not know Adobe owns colors. What a joke.

You've just lost all your credibility. Rest in peace.

P.S. Not targeted at "btarunr".
Really?
Posted on Reply
#19
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Nokiron
Really?
Yeah, that guy's ... well he has funny ideas.
Posted on Reply
#20
Sony Xperia S
Frick
Yeah, that guy's ... well he has funny ideas.
But probably he has a point.
Look at what wiki says about it:

The Adobe RGB (1998) color space is an RGB color space developed by Adobe Systems, Inc. in 1998. It was designed to encompass most of the colors achievable on CMYK color printers, but by using RGB primary colors on a device such as a computer display. The Adobe RGB (1998) color space encompasses roughly 50% of thevisible colors specified by the CIELAB color space – improving upon the gamut of the sRGB color space, primarily in cyan-green hues.

To me this sounds very primitive, just look how many of those visible colours are not seen on screens. :(
Why MOST and not all colours ?

Posted on Reply
#21
McSteel
Sony Xperia S
AOC i2369vm 1920 X 1080 has that LG panel but in this model Acer, the display beats it and is the best 'lower resolution' 1440 X 900 display I have seen:


Can you confirm which panel is inside Acer Aspire 7720 ?
Well, there's a QVL (qualified vendor list) that's not exactly public, but in my personal experience, those Acers have either an LG LP171WP4 or an AUO B170PW01. Basically any single-CCFL 17.3" LCD model will fit, so you can't really say for certain without opening up the screen bezel/shell and looking at the part number on the panel.
Sony Xperia S
But probably he has a point.
Look at what wiki says about it:

The Adobe RGB (1998) color space is an RGB color space developed by Adobe Systems, Inc. in 1998. It was designed to encompass most of the colors achievable on CMYK color printers, but by using RGB primary colors on a device such as a computer display. The Adobe RGB (1998) color space encompasses roughly 50% of thevisible colors specified by the CIELAB color space – improving upon the gamut of the sRGB color space, primarily in cyan-green hues.

To me this sounds very primitive, just look how many of those visible colours are not seen on screens. :(
Why MOST and not all colours ?


Well, the way displays work is preventing us from generating an arbitrary light wavelength, so we make do with what we (or, rather the semiconductors and/or the phosphors) can produce.
In order to reproduce the full color spectrum, we'd need a blackbody emitter with a continuous emission spectrum. To cover all of the visible spectrum, such an emitter would need to have a temperature of around 6300°C. And even then not all the wavelengths would have the same emission intensity, so we'd have to correct for that discrepancy. Semiconductor emitters only radiate certain (more or less) narrow bands of light spectrum, so we are only able to produce a certain number of light wavelengths by combining several different light sources.
Posted on Reply
#22
Sony Xperia S
McSteel
Well, there's a QVL (qualified vendor list) that's not exactly public, but in my personal experience, those Acers have either an LG LP171WP4 or an AUO B170PW01. Basically any single-CCFL 17.3" LCD model will fit, so you can't really say for certain without opening up the screen bezel/shell and looking at the part number on the panel.
I think it's the LG.Philips LP171WP4 TLN1. Because it's the glare type, while the AUO's is matte. ;)

It's a Wonder how a TN panel can produce such an image compared to the LG's AH-IPS.
Posted on Reply
#23
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
McSteel
Well, the way displays work is preventing us from generating an arbitrary light wavelength, so we make do with what we (or, rather the semiconductors and/or the phosphors) can produce.
In order to reproduce the full color spectrum, we'd need a blackbody emitter with a continuous emission spectrum. To cover all of the visible spectrum, such an emitter would need to have a temperature of around 6300°C. And even then not all the wavelengths would have the same emission intensity, so we'd have to correct for that discrepancy. Semiconductor emitters only radiate certain (more or less) narrow bands of light spectrum, so we are only able to produce a certain number of light wavelengths by combining several different light sources.
So what you're saying is that we need a fusion light source...
Posted on Reply
#24
McSteel
Sony Xperia S
I think it's the LG.Philips LP171WP4 TLN1. Because it's the glare type, while the AUO's is matte. ;)

It's a Wonder how a TN panel can produce such an image compared to the LG's AH-IPS.
The LG one is also available in matte, upon request. It's just a finisher coating, but it does influence the final image quality - glare/gloss finish contributes to contrast and saturation, as it's the least obstructive coating. Matte finish is essentially sprayed-on particles, which disperse the outgoing light the same way they do incoming light. This means the maximum contrast achieved will be lower, as well as color saturation.

Anti-glare and hard-coating the display make it more easily viewable near intense light sources and resistant to scratching. On the other hand, a glossy display is only really usable in dimly lit or dark environments (and is harder to keep clean and smudge-free).
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment