Monday, September 7th 2015

ViewSonic Intros a Pair of 25-inch IPS Monitors for the Health Conscious

Whether for casual or professional use, users are now in demand an all-in-one, versatile monitor that not only suggests chic and stylish, but also offers with a broad range of functions i.e. low EMI emission, Flicker-free, and Blue Light Filter health care benefits. ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of visual solution products, proudly presents two new stylish 25" Full HD multimedia monitors, the gold- and black-coloured VX2573-sg and the silver- and white-coloured VX2573-shw.
These two products have a borderless, glossy-finish, and gold/silver colour design, which is ideal for homes with a contemporary décor. The VX2573 series is ViewSonic's latest line of 25-inch displays equipped with SuperClear IPS technology. It deliver s a 178/178 degree wide viewing angle with stunning image quality and powerful visual performance.

Compared with 24-inch, the 25-inch monitor is 11% larger by area, and delivers a great screen-to-body ratio for a more enjoyable viewing experience. The VX2573 features including low EMI emission, Flicker-free, and Blue Light Filter eye-care technologies aim to establish a reliable and sincere commitment for the users' health. With its eye-catching look and its heath care benefits, the VX2573 series stands out from the crowd.
To ensure the safety of products, all ViewSonic monitors are required to meet the global regulatory compliance. In fact, The VX2573 series monitor exceeds beyond the standard requirements, by running the lowest level of EMI and radiation disturbance, far better than the average level in the industry. In comparison with international brands based on the TCO regulatory compliance (the global standard in display appliance regulated by SCPE - Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe), the radiation of VX2573 series is 30% lower. Compared with other display brands of cheaper prices, the radiation of VX2573 series is 50% lower and better than the average global standard. After undergoing a rigorous assessment, the VX2573 series not only fulfills the strict regulation but also, efficiently decreased energy and electricity consumption, saving up to 25% on energy costs and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The VX2573 series carries Full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution which enables users to discover more delicate details and more comprehensive content. It also includes VGA, DVI, HDMI and MHL input options and a pair of integrated speakers (VX2573-shw only) to provide a complete multimedia package for home entertainment. You will get to experience amazing clarity in video watching, photo viewing, or multimedia entertaining. With a convenient "My Button" hotkey design, it allows users to easily access specific OSD functions of ViewMode and Blue Light Filter, for further adjustment with one press of a button. For eye care benefits, the series is equipped with ViewSonic's latest Flicker-free and Blue Light Filter eye-care technologies. Flicker-Free technology completely eliminates screen flickering by integrating DC-modulation LED backlights. The benefit of this technology is to reduce discomfort and eye fatigue, preventing the occurrence of CVS.

ViewSonic's Blue Light Filter technology can be adjusted to different viewing scenarios, lowering the amount of blue light output to a maximum of 87% and protecting viewers from the possible side effects of blue light without compromising the colour performance.

The VX2573 comes with ViewSonic's unique ViewMode feature offering "Game," "Movie," "Web," "Text," and "Mono" presets. These presets enhance gamma curve, colour temperature, contrast, and brightness to deliver an optimal viewing experience for different screen applications.
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11 Comments on ViewSonic Intros a Pair of 25-inch IPS Monitors for the Health Conscious

#1
Prima.Vera
Wondering how long do we have to wait for AMOLED displays bigger than 20"...
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#2
pidgin
glossy border or display is glossy?

Price? Release date? I'd buy for reasonable price and non-glossy variant.
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#4
pidgin
does AMOLED fix the backbleed issues that current monitors have? I mean there are literally no good monitors on the market today. Almost all of the "high-end" ridicilously priced monitors have such a disgusting bleed its not even funny.
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#5
nullington
pidgin, post: 3341146, member: 135409"
does AMOLED fix the backbleed issues that current monitors have? I mean there are literally no good monitors on the market today. Almost all of the "high-end" ridicilously priced monitors have such a disgusting bleed its not even funny.
Yes. AMOLED is completely different, there is no such backlight blocking going on.

Imho AMOLED monitors are mostly needed for movies and games. Till these monitors arrive, Occulus VR is a good alternative since it has AMOLED screens. Occulus VR may even be better than an AMOLED monitor in certain cases.
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#6
LAN_deRf_HA
pidgin, post: 3341146, member: 135409"
Almost all of the "high-end" ridicilously priced monitors have such a disgusting bleed its not even funny.
Pretty much. Why I find "premium" monitors to be a horrible waste of money. Same panels as the cheaper stuff, same amount of backlight bleed.

The part that really pisses me off is that money could be going to fixing the bleed issue because it is an assembly/housing issue, as in something they could be putting that extra money towards fixing, but they don't.
Posted on Reply
#7
kn00tcn
pidgin, post: 3341146, member: 135409"
does AMOLED fix the backbleed issues that current monitors have? I mean there are literally no good monitors on the market today. Almost all of the "high-end" ridicilously priced monitors have such a disgusting bleed its not even funny.
LAN_deRf_HA, post: 3341291, member: 51413"
Pretty much. Why I find "premium" monitors to be a horrible waste of money. Same panels as the cheaper stuff, same amount of backlight bleed.

The part that really pisses me off is that money could be going to fixing the bleed issue because it is an assembly/housing issue, as in something they could be putting that extra money towards fixing, but they don't.
'IPS glow' has NOTHING to do with 'backlight bleed' coming from the assembly (these are the terms you're looking for)

when there are TN & VA monitors with little to no bleed, shouldnt you have realized there is something inherent with IPS that is different?

IPS glow is entirely based on the viewing angle of your eye relative to each pixel, that is why if you are above the monitor, you will see more light on the bottom left, as you move around in multiple directions, you will see the light isnt fixed in a physical position

there are apparently ways to reduce it, something about polarized IPS or other filters/layers on the screen itself...

which 'premium' ones have you seen? a $1,500 eizo? (not that i've seen such a thing)

another interesting thing is sometimes there are TVs that have reduced glow, so it seems some companies do deal with it, but they stick to home entertainment rather than desktop usage (presumably due to movies being dark or with black bars)
Posted on Reply
#8
LAN_deRf_HA
kn00tcn, post: 3341319, member: 65960"
'IPS glow' has NOTHING to do with 'backlight bleed' coming from the assembly (these are the terms you're looking for)

when there are TN & VA monitors with little to no bleed, shouldnt you have realized there is something inherent with IPS that is different?

IPS glow is entirely based on the viewing angle of your eye relative to each pixel, that is why if you are above the monitor, you will see more light on the bottom left, as you move around in multiple directions, you will see the light isnt fixed in a physical position

there are apparently ways to reduce it, something about polarized IPS or other filters/layers on the screen itself...

which 'premium' ones have you seen? a $1,500 eizo? (not that i've seen such a thing)

another interesting thing is sometimes there are TVs that have reduced glow, so it seems some companies do deal with it, but they stick to home entertainment rather than desktop usage (presumably due to movies being dark or with black bars)
If you want to make the distinction ok, generally speaking people don't bother since both happen in the same parts of the screen, are primarily issues on black scenes, vary panel to panel, and the terminology carries over from when we had TN panels and it was just bleed. On the topic of glow it hasn't been strong enough to bother me on most of my IPS displays. Sure it doesn't look great next to my tv but it's plasma so that's to be expected.

I don't know about the filter thing I just blame assembly because once in a blue moon you find an IPS that has only the slightest hint of it, others there's a sheen all the way to the middle of the screen, and just wide variance all around on the same monitor models.

Premium displays I'm talking about are the ones from Apple and Samsung that share the same panels as cheaper displays yet still can have terrible bleed/glow. Total crap shoot when it shouldn't be at that price level because they do have the ability to minimize it considering that there is variance.
Posted on Reply
#9
Prima.Vera
pidgin, post: 3341146, member: 135409"
does AMOLED fix the backbleed issues that current monitors have? I mean there are literally no good monitors on the market today. Almost all of the "high-end" ridicilously priced monitors have such a disgusting bleed its not even funny.
Not sure of the issue. My Galaxy Tab S tablet has the best screen I have seen ever. Not even high end CRT monitors can coupe with that quality.
Posted on Reply
#10
kn00tcn
LAN_deRf_HA, post: 3341381, member: 51413"
If you want to make the distinction ok, generally speaking people don't bother since both happen in the same parts of the screen, are primarily issues on black scenes, vary panel to panel, and the terminology carries over from when we had TN panels and it was just bleed. On the topic of glow it hasn't been strong enough to bother me on most of my IPS displays. Sure it doesn't look great next to my tv but it's plasma so that's to be expected.

I don't know about the filter thing I just blame assembly because once in a blue moon you find an IPS that has only the slightest hint of it, others there's a sheen all the way to the middle of the screen, and just wide variance all around on the same monitor models.

Premium displays I'm talking about are the ones from Apple and Samsung that share the same panels as cheaper displays yet still can have terrible bleed/glow. Total crap shoot when it shouldn't be at that price level because they do have the ability to minimize it considering that there is variance.
we need to make the distinction since there are TWO different causes of 'that part of the monitor looks bright on an all black image'

IPS (& PLS) glow changes position based on your viewing angle, therefore it's impossible to be part of the assembly, it's impossible to deal with it unless something is done to individual pixels or to the layers

the further above & to the right that your eyes are relative to the monitor, the brighter it is starting from your centered eye level & down+left, so when comparing models or units, you need to make sure to be in the exact same position (or just move to the left & below so that the only light visible is the bleed)

bleed is a thing on every single (non localized-)backlight based monitor that comes from the difference in uniformity (how flat & tight the panel edge is relative to the bezel or whatever encloses the backlight layer), this is what SHOULD be commonly reduced on 'premium' monitors, or at least the variance should be reduced between units

(i wouldnt trust anything from samsung or apple in the first place, well maybe apple would color calibrate, but that's about it)

speaking of backlights, that's pretty much the workaround for both issues, rather than making physical perfection, just dont have light shining in an area that should be black, there are plenty of TVs like this but why dont they do it to small desktop monitors or laptops?
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#11
_larry
If it was 1440p and/or 144hz, I would be sold....sigh.
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