Thursday, February 18th 2016

Linksys Intros the EA7500 AC1900 MU-MIMO Router

Linksys, the first to sell 100 million routers globally and a leader in networking solutions for the home and business, today announced the availability of its Linksys Max-Stream AC1900 MU-MIMO Gigabit Wi-Fi Router (EA7500). The new Linksys AC1900 MU-MIMO router leverages the 802.11ac Wave 2 MU-MIMO (Multi-User, Multiple Input, Multiple Output) technology, which helps ensure uninterrupted Wi-Fi connectivity to multiple devices in the home and functions as if multiple devices have their own dedicated router. With MU-MIMO, the whole household can enjoy 4K and HD TV streaming to multiple devices as well as play video games, listen to music, check email, shop, and more - all at the same time.

Perfect for families with multiple users with their own streaming devices, the Max-Stream AC1900 leverages MU-MIMO functionality which helps make Wi-Fi networks more efficient when delivering high bandwidth 4K streams to multiple devices at the same time. Market research firm DisplaySearch/IHS recently reported shipments of 4K Ultra HDTVs reached 6 million in North America in 2015 and forecasts to double to 12 Million in 2016.

"If you have or are planning to purchase a 4K TV you will need a Max-Stream router to ensure you have a seamless 4K online streaming experience," said Justin Doucette, director product management, Linksys. "A single stream of 4K content takes a minimum of 20 Mbps to maintain a consistent stream, and when you combine that with multiple streams plus normal Wi-Fi use from gaming, internet surfing, IoT connectivity and music streaming, it adds up fast. Max-Stream will enable multiple streams of Wi-Fi to occur so users can have the ultimate 4K and networking experience."

The Next-Gen Max-Stream AC1900 can provide users with combined speeds up to 1.9 Gbps* and the range they need to connect all their devices in the home and at the same time. Also included is Smart Wi-Fi technology which makes it easy to set up and control your home Wi-Fi from anywhere using the Smart Wi-Fi app on your mobile device.

The EA7500 features:
  • Next-Gen AC Wi-Fi - 802.11ac Wave 2 with MU-MIMO Technology for uninterrupted Wi-Fi connections to multiple devices at the same time
  • Qualcomm IPQ 1.4GHz Dual Core Processor
  • Dual-band AC1900 Wireless speeds up to 1300 Mbps 5 GHz + 600 Mbps 2.4GHz, which is a combined speed up to 1.9 Gbps*
  • Four Gigabit LAN Ethernet ports One Gigabit WAN for wired speeds up to 10x faster than fast Ethernet
  • One USB 3.0 and One USB 2.0 ports for connecting printers, storage and more
  • Three external and adjustable antennas for maximum coverage
  • Manage and monitor your network and easily control Wi-Fi devices remotely on a smart phone with the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi app
  • Advanced WPA/WPA2 encryption and SPI firewall helps keep the network safe
The Linksys AC1900 MU-MIMO router will help address buffering issues customers are having today and into the future with 4K content.

The Linksys Max-Stream AC1900 MU-MIMO Gigabit Wi-Fi Router (EA7500) is immediately available at leading retail and online retailers including Amazon, Best Buy, Fry's, Micro Center Newegg and RadioShack at an MSRP of $199.99.
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12 Comments on Linksys Intros the EA7500 AC1900 MU-MIMO Router

#1
AthlonX2
HyperVtX™
Solid router, no real issues when streaming youtube over 14 hours straight. Handles typical NAS traffic with ease as well.
Posted on Reply
#2
kn00tcn
AthlonX2 said:
Solid router, no real issues when streaming youtube over 14 hours straight. Handles typical NAS traffic with ease as well.
why would any router have a problem with youtube streaming? that's not even 'routing' much
Posted on Reply
#3
Toothless
kn00tcn said:
why would any router have a problem with youtube streaming? that's not even 'routing' much
Depends on resolution.
Posted on Reply
#4
AthlonX2
HyperVtX™
I have had a lot of routers that seem to fail with streaming content usually stuttering or stopping to buffer, often times it is fixed with firmware updates or a reboot.
Posted on Reply
#5
kn00tcn
Toothless said:
Depends on resolution.
...how? http://www.animafelina.it/test-video-quality-720p-1080p-1440p-2160p-max-bitrate-which-compresses-youtube/ megabits are megabits, it's probably worse on a router to be running sustained speed tests (since most streaming players by now do smaller chunks of video, not 'download the entire file at full speed')

AthlonX2 said:
I have had a lot of routers that seem to fail with streaming content usually stuttering or stopping to buffer, often times it is fixed with firmware updates or a reboot.
that just seems so bizarre, so you're telling me... with no change to the isp (or peak hours), no change to the software, no guarantee that the isp or cdn or website or player isnt at fault, that a new or powerful router results in solving those problems? are they particularly low end routers or using wifi?

just have to see it to believe it, we're not talking about 200 connection torrents or realtime video conferencing that lacks a buffer (which btw is entirely the responsibility of the player)
Posted on Reply
#6
AthlonX2
HyperVtX™
I can tell you I have a 75 down 6 up connection. With certain routers I can stream netflix,hulu or youtube for over 10 hours straight and others will start to hiccup within an hour or two.
Posted on Reply
#7
RejZoR
I don't freaking understand why not a single damn company takes TomatoRAF as base for the firmware. It's the only god damn firmware that uses by far the best QoS in existence. You have amazing port control, re-arranging of rules from top to bottom priority, Layer7 support, something stupid DD-WRT/OpenWRT has never heard of. Then you have indpendent priority profiles for upload and download, graphs where you read out what service is taking over the bandwidth and create a rule directly from that info.

Linksys E4200 that I had before with TomatoRAF was the best thing ever when it comes to bandwidth management. I could arrange all services in such a way that traffic never ever stalled, no matter what I was doing at once. Downloading, using P2P, streaming Youtube and downloading games through Steam as well as having highest priority ports for Steam games. On my current ASUS RT-AC87U, even though it's great, I have to use moronic DD-WRT stye priority contro for QoS or the automatic one which seems to have slow response time and needs time to kick in and switch priorities. Where TomatoRAF did that instantly.

RT-AC87U is listed as WIP (Work in Progress) on TomatoRAF page, but I don't think I'll ever see it. Which is a shame. I want those QoS controls back.
Posted on Reply
#8
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
RejZoR said:
I don't freaking understand why not a single damn company takes TomatoRAF as base for the firmware.
Because tomato is open and people can tell whether or not companies are sending private back to the government.
Posted on Reply
#9
RejZoR
So is DD-WRT and OpenWRT that companies use as a base for their routers...
Posted on Reply
#10
Jetster
RejZoR said:
So is DD-WRT and OpenWRT that companies use as a base for their routers...
No linksys had an open code source for their firmware
Posted on Reply
#11
RejZoR
It's based on some sort of WRT. You can see that clearly by opening the QoS panel (the manual one, not "SmartQoS" and other overlays). It just reeks of WRT.

Also, firmware for Linksys (at least the E4200 that I had) and ASUS RT-AC87U is open source. As the one above was mentioning spying after users...
Posted on Reply
#12
Jetster
RejZoR said:
It's based on some sort of WRT. You can see that clearly by opening the QoS panel (the manual one, not "SmartQoS" and other overlays). It just reeks of WRT.

Also, firmware for Linksys (at least the E4200 that I had) and ASUS RT-AC87U is open source. As the one above was mentioning spying after users...
DD-WRT is a Linksys based firmware. Just like tomato they used Linksys's codeing for Linux system

The firmware project's name, DD-WRT, was taken in part from the Linksys WRT54G model router
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