Saturday, November 26th 2016

"Zoom and Enhance" to Become a Reality Thanks to Machine Learning

The one phrase from television that makes IT people and creative professionals cringe the most is "zoom and enhance" - the notion that you zoom into a digital image and, at the push of a button, it converts a pixellated image into something with details - which lets CSI catch the bad guys. Up until now, this has been laughably impossible. Images are made up of dots called pixels, and the more pixels you have, the more details you can have in your image (resolution). Zooming into images eventually shows you a colorful checkerboard that's proud of its identity.

Google is tapping into machine-learning, in an attempt to change this. The company has reportedly come up with a machine-learning technique that attempts to reconstruct details in low-resolution images. Google is calling this RAISR (rapid and accurate image super-resolution). The technology works with the software learning "edges" of a picture (portions of the image with drastic changes in color and brightness gradients), and attempts to reconstruct them. What makes this different from conventional super-sampling methods is its machine-learning component. A low-resolution image is studied by the machine to invent an upscaling method most effective for the image, in-situ. While its application in law-enforcement is tricky, and will only become a reality when a reasonably high court of law sets a spectacular precedent; this technology could have commercial applications in up-scaling low-resolution movies to new formats such as 4K Ultra HD, and perhaps even 8K.
Source: Google
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28 Comments on "Zoom and Enhance" to Become a Reality Thanks to Machine Learning

#26
arterius2
WithoutWeakness
The "watercooling-powered backplate" appears to be an acrylic reservoir. There are a few threaded inserts for tubing fittings on the backplate. You can see red and black wires attached to the backplate in the third photo which I would guess are to power LEDs. The front of the card is the waterblock plus aluminum fins and fans. It is likely very similar to what Asus did on their Poseidon cards. The waterblock on the front has a few threaded connections on the end piece that you can see in the third photo. This is where you would attach barbs at tubing for the GPU. There is likely a pump buried somewhere under that monstrosity of a 3-slot cooler or inside the silver block on the end of the cooler.
I like pizza too.
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#27
WithoutWeakness
arterius2
I like pizza too.
Whoops. Wrong comments section.

This is a great example of the dangers of multiple tabs, kids. Always browse one tab at a time. Otherwise you'll wind up posting a comment on the wrong article and look like a buffoon.

For those interested in what I was talking about, here is an article about a new GTX 1080 graphics card with an interesting watercooling block and reservoir attached to the card itself: https://www.techpowerup.com/228215/colorful-unveils-the-igame-gtx-1080-kudan#comments
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#28
Prima.Vera
Maybe he was just patronizing your comment, so putting the joke is on you... :) :) :)
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