Friday, March 24th 2017

Invading Subscriber Privacy - Senate Says ISPs Can Now Sell Your Data

The US Senate on Thursday passed a joint resolution to eliminate broadband privacy rules that would have required ISPs to get consumers' explicit consent before selling or sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other companies. This win was pulled by a hair - 48 Nay against 50 Yea - and went entirely through party lines, with Republicans voting Yea, and the Democrats voting Nay. The effects won't be immediate, mind you - the measure will have to pass the House and then be signed by President Donald Trump before it can become law.
The FCC's privacy rules that are now put in peril would require ISPs to get opt-in consent from consumers before selling or sharing personal information. This includes geo-location data, financial and health information, children's information, Social Security numbers, Web browsing history, app usage history, and the content of communications - things we can all agree give almost unthinkable leeway in understanding your daily habits. Opt-out requirements, on the other hand, would have applied to less sensitive data such as e-mail addresses and service tier information, much less important in the scheme of things.

These opt-in and opt-out provisions were to take effect as early as December 4, 2017. The rules would also force ISPs to clearly notify customers about the types of information they collected, specifying how they use and share the information, and identifying the types of entities they'd share the information with.

The FCC's privacy rules also had a data security component that would have required ISPs to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information from theft and data breaches. This was supposed to take effect on March 2, but the FCC's Republican majority halted the rule's implementation. Another set of requirements related to data breach notifications is scheduled to take effect on June 2.

As was to be expected, party lines didn't fracture only on the Senate floor, with comments and positions regarding the voting separating cleanly in all other areas.

Ajit Pai, the new chairman of the newly Republican-led FCC, welcomed the Senate vote, telling reporters that his own core goal was "to make sure that uniform expectation of privacy is vindicated through the use of a regulatory framework that establishes a more level playing field."

Senator Bill Nelson, on the other hand, said during Senate floor debate that "Your home broadband provider can know when you wake up each day-either by knowing the time each morning that you log on to the Internet to check the weather/news of the morning, or through a connected device in your home (...) and that provider may know immediately if you are not feeling well - assuming you decide to peruse the Internet like most of us to get a quick check on your symptoms. In fact, your broadband provider may know more about your health - and your reaction to illness - than you are willing to share with your doctor."

Home Internet providers can also "build a profile about your listening and viewing habits." Mobile broadband providers, on the other hand, "know how you move about your day through information about your geo-location and Internet activity through your mobile device," Senator Bill Nelson said.

"This is a gold mine of data-the holy grail so to speak," Nelson said. "It is no wonder that broadband providers want to be able to sell this information to the highest bidder without consumers' knowledge or consent. And they want to collect and use this information without providing transparency or being held accountable."

This measure also ties the FCC's hands in advancing "substantially similar" rules in the future. Kate Tummarello, a policy analyst for the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), pits this as a "crushing loss for online privacy."

"ISPs act as gatekeepers to the Internet, giving them incredible access to records of what you do online," Tummarello said. "They shouldn't be able to profit off of the information about what you search for, read about, purchase and more without your consent."

What is your opinion on this matter? is this the way you envision your connected life?Source: NBC News, Ars Technica, Senate.gov
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109 Comments on Invading Subscriber Privacy - Senate Says ISPs Can Now Sell Your Data

#1
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
This is why it's important to go out and vote.
Posted on Reply
#2
Fourstaff
What does "pass the house" mean?
Posted on Reply
#3
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
Fourstaff said:
What does "pass the house" mean?
A bill has to pass through both senate and house.
Posted on Reply
#4
Totally
Raevenlord said:


What is your opinion on this matter?
All the Skankhunt42's out there might want to take notice, and anyone get the feeling of DMCA 2.0 with a vengeance?

Fourstaff said:
What does "pass the house" mean?
Voted on in Senate[ passed ] > Voted on in House of Republicans [pass or dies] > Executive office(president) [becomes law/vetoed then dies or goes back to Senate]
Posted on Reply
#5
dorsetknob
"YOUR RMA REQUEST IS CON-REFUSED"
Raevenlord said:
the measure will have to pass the House and then be signed by President Donald Trump before it can become law.
:) X[SIZE=3] marks the spot then[/SIZE]
Posted on Reply
#6
Boosnie
We The People Wallets
Posted on Reply
#7
alucasa
Don't care for 2 reasons.

1. I am in Canada.
2. I don't really have much to hide. Well, I've got my porn collection but most men do. I hardly use torrents, either. I pay for what I download.
Posted on Reply
#8
Boatvan
I feel I may be outspoken on this, but I believe the internet is the final frontier of free speech. Browsing data is not a commodity that should be bought and sold. The "I have nothing to hide" argument is weak in my opinion. I myself have nothing to hide, but I think I should be asked for my consent before my browsing history is sold to an advertiser. It is a slippery slope too. What will they come for next?
Posted on Reply
#9
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Sure, it's fine when the NSA/CIA illegally collect all of data but when an ISP does it legally then people suddenly care. This is a political issue. If people cared about privacy then they would be marching in the streets against what the NSA and CIA have been doing illegally for years.
Posted on Reply
#10
Boatvan
Easy Rhino said:
Sure, it's fine when the NSA/CIA illegally collect all of data but when an ISP does it legally then people suddenly care.
I agree it is ironic. I just don't think the latter should be legal.
Posted on Reply
#11
alucasa
Boatvan said:
I feel I may be outspoken on this, but I believe the internet is the final frontier of free speech. Browsing data is not a commodity that should be bought and sold. The "I have nothing to hide" argument is weak in my opinion. I myself have nothing to hide, but I think I should be asked for my consent before my browsing history is sold to an advertiser. It is a slippery slope too. What will they come for next?
The Internet was a new frontier indeed, but it wasn't about freedom of speech. I never considered the Internet to be a place for it.

Human history and logic dictates that sooner or later the Internet will be regulated more and more. That's how a new frontier becomes old and another new frontier will be discovered eventually where false hopes will be born again.
Posted on Reply
#12
Boatvan
alucasa said:
The Internet was a new frontier indeed, but it wasn't about freedom of speech. I never considered the Internet to be a place for it.

Human history and logic dictates that sooner or later the Internet will be regulated more and more. That's how a new frontier becomes old and another new frontier will be discovered eventually where false hopes will be born again.
I understand where you are coming from, but shouldn't we at least put up a fight?
Posted on Reply
#13
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Boatvan said:
I agree it is ironic. I just don't think the latter should be legal.
I don't care if an ISP bundles my info anonymously and sells it so long as I know that is what I am signing up for. If we had true competition then the consumer could make the decision for themselves. Maybe we will see huge technological leaps in wireless soon making running cable/fiber lines on poles a thing of the past.
Posted on Reply
#14
alucasa
Boatvan said:
I understand where you are coming from, but shouldn't we at least put up a fight?
Some will. I won't.

I am sure people felt the same about the wild west of America. People resisted. But era moved on.
Posted on Reply
#15
yogurt_21
Easy Rhino said:
Maybe we will see huge technological leaps in wireless soon making running cable/fiber lines on poles a thing of the past.
This is what I'm hoping for. Think about only paying one service, rather than for phone/data and cable/internet

you just pay once.

it will be glorious
Posted on Reply
#16
Totally
Easy Rhino said:
Sure, it's fine when the NSA/CIA illegally collect all of data but when an ISP does it legally then people suddenly care. This is a political issue. If people cared about privacy then they would be marching in the streets against what the NSA and CIA have been doing illegally for years.
I don't feel that it is ironic for a couple reasons.

1. Not saying that I didn't care when the CIA did it but the CIA is not my ISP and is a third party.
2. ISPs are in the best position collect information about people whether it is harmless or not.
3. This is opening up everyone's info to anyone willing to open up their wallet to pay for whatever they're asking which includes the aforementioned CIA.
4. There goes any semblance of net neutrality/privacy.
5. This is the gov't backdooring CIA/DHS/NSA's failed spying efforts by awarding ISP's the right to sell our info, which works for them because all they need to do now is simply purchase the info of persons of interest without doing any of the work, or due process since it is a purchase.
Posted on Reply
#17
alucasa
It's too bad that I won't be alive to see the space age.

It will be the new, HUGE, frontier for mankind. I can feel it... I just won't be there to experience it.

Wish I was born 1,000 years later...
Posted on Reply
#18
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Totally said:
I don't feel that it is ironic for a couple reasons.

1. Not saying that I didn't care when the CIA did it but the CIA is not my ISP and is a third party.
2. ISPs are in the best position collect information about people whether it is harmless or not.
3. This is opening up everyone's info to anyone willing to open up their wallet to pay for whatever they're asking which includes the aforementioned CIA.
4. There goes any semblance of net neutrality/privacy.
5. This is the gov't backdooring CIA/DHS/NSA's failed spying efforts by awarding ISP's the right to sell our info, which works for them because all they need to do now is simply purchase the info of persons of interest without doing any of the work, or due process since it is a purchase.
Government should not be allowed to buy people's personal data from ISPs or any vendor.
Posted on Reply
#19
wiyosaya
Easy Rhino said:
Sure, it's fine when the NSA/CIA illegally collect all of data but when an ISP does it legally then people suddenly care. This is a political issue. If people cared about privacy then they would be marching in the streets against what the NSA and CIA have been doing illegally for years.
Actually, I have never thought it was fine for the NSA/CIA to illegally collect data, nor do I think it is fine for ISPs to collect and sell it legally.

If this passes, and you can bet that it is highly likely it will given the current F the little guy even if they did vote for 45 atmosphere in DC, the NSA/CIA/your favorite US three-letter security agency will only have to demand it from your ISP.
Posted on Reply
#20
Totally
Easy Rhino said:
Government should not be allowed to buy people's personal data from ISPs or any vendor.
You say that but that is what they're trying to set up for themselves. Gov't gets their spying, and business (e.g. MPAA/RIAA) get the tool they've always wanted to go after people.
Posted on Reply
#21
wiyosaya
yogurt_21 said:
This is what I'm hoping for. Think about only paying one service, rather than for phone/data and cable/internet

you just pay once.

it will be glorious
Wow! What a dream. However, at least as I see it, no ISP in the US is currently interested in anything other than how much money they can make on their subscribers. Upgrading infrastructure in any way is costly and bites into their bottom line. This may be a new source of revenue for them, however, my bet is it will not be used on infrastructure upgrades even if it vastly increases their profits.
Posted on Reply
#22
AsRock
TPU addict
alucasa said:
Don't care for 2 reasons.

1. I am in Canada.
2. I don't really have much to hide. Well, I've got my porn collection but most men do. I hardly use torrents, either. I pay for what I download.
Lucky you :p, but to be allowed to give out peoples Social Security numbers is ludicrous.

RCoon said:
This is why it's important to go out and vote.
What a load of Bollocks.

Easy Rhino said:
Sure, it's fine when the NSA/CIA illegally collect all of data but when an ISP does it legally then people suddenly care. This is a political issue. If people cared about privacy then they would be marching in the streets against what the NSA and CIA have been doing illegally for years.
But they do not do it to make money, more to the point of trying to keep people safer.
Posted on Reply
#23
alucasa
AsRock said:
Lucky you :p, but to be allowed to give out peoples Social Security numbers is ludicrous.
Canada ain't much better. For an example, health care system is overloaded so much that you die waiting for treatments. If you got the money, you've better go out of country for speedy treatments.
Posted on Reply
#24
evernessince
alucasa said:
The Internet was a new frontier indeed, but it wasn't about freedom of speech. I never considered the Internet to be a place for it.

Human history and logic dictates that sooner or later the Internet will be regulated more and more. That's how a new frontier becomes old and another new frontier will be discovered eventually where false hopes will be born again.
Well aren't you a lovely cup of tea? A defeatist through and though.

FYI regulated doesn't have to mean you give up any of your freedom. In fact the article in question only pertained to the ISP's ABILITY TO SELL YOUR DATA.

Also, the wild west turned into California, Nveda, ect. Last I checked, the only freedom they gave up in comparison to the wild west was the constant threat of violence. You seems to have one hell of a misconstrued vision of the past.
Posted on Reply
#25
alucasa
evernessince said:
Well aren't you a lovely cup of tea? A defeatist through and though.

FYI regulated doesn't have to mean you give up any of your freedom. In fact the article in question only pertained to the ISP's ABILITY TO SELL YOUR DATA.

Also, the wild west turned into California, Nveda, ect. Last I checked, the only freedom they gave up in comparison to the wild west was the constant threat of violence. You seems to have one hell of a misconstrued vision of the past.
Yay, I forced a lurker to post.
Posted on Reply
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