Thursday, April 13th 2017

Colorful Intros GeForce GTX 1080 Ti iGame Vulcan AD

Colorful today introduced the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti iGame Vulcan AD graphics card. The card combines a custom-design PCB that features pure silver contacts, with a triple-slot cooling solution. The card draws power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors, and conditions it using an 8+2 phase VRM. The company didn't reveal the factory-overclocked speeds.

The cooling solution consists of a dual aluminium fin-stack heatsink with five 6 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes cooling the GPU, and a base-plate conveying heat from the memory and VRM to the heatsink. This heatsink is ventilated by three fans, two larger 100 mm fans along the ends, and a smaller 80 mm fan in the center. Display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.4, and one each of HDMI 2.0b and DVI. Other features include dual-BIOS and idle fan-stop. The company didn't reveal pricing.
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10 Comments on Colorful Intros GeForce GTX 1080 Ti iGame Vulcan AD

#1
Xzibit
Does it improve VulKan performance over the other 1080 TI

I like the design for the center fan. I dont like that its 2.5 slots
Posted on Reply
#3
Live OR Die
All i have to say is WTF would you add shitty old DVI back onto the PCB when Nvidia clearly removed it because its hardly used.
Posted on Reply
#4
DRDNA
Live OR Die
All i have to say is WTF would you add shitty old DVI back onto the PCB when Nvidia clearly removed it because its hardly used.
Room for one more monitor to make it a nice odd 5 screens. I think it could be handy ;)
Posted on Reply
#5
darklm
Live OR Die
All i have to say is WTF would you add shitty old DVI back onto the PCB when Nvidia clearly removed it because its hardly used.
Yeah, remove that old conector, because its so easy to find a DisplayPort or HDMI (a 2.0 compatible one) cable in some countries where Amazon it's not an option...

Its there because some manufacturers know this

I have a BenQ XL2420t that only allows 120Hz from DVI or DisplayPort and I'm still looking for a DisplayPort cable for the last three years
Posted on Reply
#6
Live OR Die
DRDNA
Room for one more monitor to make it a nice odd 5 screens. I think it could be handy ;)
haha but you would just go out and buy a DP hub if you wanted to add more screens.
darklm
Yeah, remove that old conector, because its so easy to find a DisplayPort or HDMI (a 2.0 compatible one) cable in some countries where Amazon it's not an option...

Its there because some manufacturers know this

I have a BenQ XL2420t that only allows 120Hz from DVI or DisplayPort and I'm still looking for a DisplayPort cable for the last three years
It is easy buy one off ebay you also get one for free with the founders edition lol.
Posted on Reply
#7
Vayra86
Live OR Die
haha but you would just go out and buy a DP hub if you wanted to add more screens.



It is easy buy one off ebay you also get one for free with the founders edition lol.
So... it's better to make consumers pay and search for an additional cable or hub or let them buy an FE so that the AIB partner makes exactly ZERO $$$, versus adding a DVI so that your product gets bought.

Sound logic there!

That DVI is a nice to have and Nvidia removing it has everything to do with cost savings, nothing much else.
Posted on Reply
#8
Live OR Die
Vayra86
So... it's better to make consumers pay and search for an additional cable or hub or let them buy an FE so that the AIB partner makes exactly ZERO $$$, versus adding a DVI so that your product gets bought.

Sound logic there!

That DVI is a nice to have and Nvidia removing it has everything to do with cost savings, nothing much else.
You get a free DP to DVI converter so whats the big deal, im glad they removed it, means when you put a waterblock on your GPU it turns it into a single slot card rather than a slot being wasted because of a crappy old connector.
Posted on Reply
#9
Vayra86
Live OR Die
You get a free DP to DVI converter so whats the big deal, im glad they removed it, means when you put a waterblock on your GPU it turns it into a single slot card rather than a slot being wasted because of a crappy old connector.
Of course, for the 5% that actually replaces the shroud this is interesting. But for them, there is an FE. And additionally, the FE is also the best buy for that group, because of ref. PCB. If you buy an AIB card, the vast majority does it because they like the shroud and the cooling capacity of that solution. Not to remove it.

You miss the point: there is a market here, so the big deal is sales.

And additionally, being versatile on card outputs is ALWAYS an advantage over having to fiddle with hubs and converters. Its nice when you can easily hook up the card to any monitor, even if its outdated. Examples are easy to come by: no bits and bobs to forget when you take it to a friend for example, who happens to have only DVI, easy to use as a replacement card in some other system, I could go on but we can both think of this.

It makes about as much sense as Apple removing a 3.5mm jack on a friggin phone, forcing everyone to come up with a new solution, one that even results in lossy playback for many. I'll tell you a little secret: 3.5mm jack analog audio cannot be enforced by DRM because its analog. Digitalizing audio, like it has occurred for HDMI HDCP on video+audio, is a major change to enforce DRM across the entire chain from storage > playback. Too bad the headphones now also cost three times as much - that speaks to me as: fuck you, Mr. Consumer, and eat this.

Funny coincidence; I'm watching a series on Netflix right now called 'Occupied' which is based on the premise of Norway stopping oil production and forcing the EU out of fossil fuels - except they forgot that all cars still have combustion engines - it results in conflict. A perfect example of how pushing ahead of the times can be a problem for many, and an advantage only for a very select few. It's a good idea to turn the reasoning around: what does Nvidia stand to gain from removing the output. And the only answer is profit.
Posted on Reply
#10
Live OR Die
Vayra86
Of course, for the 5% that actually replaces the shroud this is interesting. But for them, there is an FE. And additionally, the FE is also the best buy for that group, because of ref. PCB. If you buy an AIB card, the vast majority does it because they like the shroud and the cooling capacity of that solution. Not to remove it.

You miss the point: there is a market here, so the big deal is sales.

And additionally, being versatile on card outputs is ALWAYS an advantage over having to fiddle with hubs and converters. Its nice when you can easily hook up the card to any monitor, even if its outdated. Examples are easy to come by: no bits and bobs to forget when you take it to a friend for example, who happens to have only DVI, easy to use as a replacement card in some other system, I could go on but we can both think of this.

It makes about as much sense as Apple removing a 3.5mm jack on a friggin phone, forcing everyone to come up with a new solution, one that even results in lossy playback for many. I'll tell you a little secret: 3.5mm jack analog audio cannot be enforced by DRM because its analog. Digitalizing audio, like it has occurred for HDMI HDCP on video+audio, is a major change to enforce DRM across the entire chain from storage > playback. Too bad the headphones now also cost three times as much - that speaks to me as: fuck you, Mr. Consumer, and eat this.

Funny coincidence; I'm watching a series on Netflix right now called 'Occupied' which is based on the premise of Norway stopping oil production and forcing the EU out of fossil fuels - except they forgot that all cars still have combustion engines - it results in conflict. A perfect example of how pushing ahead of the times can be a problem for many, and an advantage only for a very select few. It's a good idea to turn the reasoning around: what does Nvidia stand to gain from removing the output. And the only answer is profit.
That being said people used DVI to VGA for years until VGA was killed off, so you can see my point.
Posted on Reply