Tuesday, October 31st 2017

DOCSIS 3.1 Makes 10 Gbps Downstream & 1 Gbps Upstream Speeds a Reality

CableLabs, the leading innovation lab for the secure delivery of high speed data, video, voice and next generation services, today completed its Full Duplex DOCSIS 3.1 specification which significantly increases upstream capacity and enables symmetric multi-Gigabit services over existing hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) technology. Anticipating a change in user demand as emerging technologies require more bandwidth, CableLabs' Full Duplex DOCSIS technology will ensure that cable operators can be ready to meet future usage needs for technologies such as virtual and augmented reality. Full Duplex DOCSIS 3.1 technology builds on the successful completion of CableLabs' DOCSIS 3.1 specification, which made deployments of 10 Gbps downstream and 1 Gbps upstream broadband possible.

"In the United States, more than 90 percent of households are connected to an HFC network, and consumers typically have higher download speeds than upload speeds," said Phil McKinney, president and chief executive officer of CableLabs. "By enabling Full Duplex DOCSIS, the upstream and downstream traffic can flow at up to 10 Gigabits concurrently, doubling the efficiency of spectrum use."
In current DOCSIS networks, spectrum is typically split between the upstream and downstream, or spectrum is shared between upstream and downstream traffic. Full duplex communication enables upstream and downstream traffic to efficiently use the same spectrum simultaneously, which can be beneficial for residential and business services. For businesses in particular, symmetric services can vastly improve network efficiency, which can, in turn, improve the customer experience on business websites.

By leveraging the combination of DOCSIS 3.1 technology, passive HFC network characteristics, self interference cancellation technology and intelligent scheduling, CableLabs - along with the collaboration of its members and other industry partners - developed this solution enabling full duplex communications over the existing HFC network. The evolution also eliminates the need and cost of deploying fiber to the home while still maintaining backward compatibility with previous generations of DOCSIS technology.

The Full Duplex DOCSIS 3.1 specification effort was initially announced by CableLabs in February 2016. The update to DOCSIS 3.1 including the complete Full Duplex DOCSIS specification will be published on the CableLabs website later this month.
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39 Comments on DOCSIS 3.1 Makes 10 Gbps Downstream & 1 Gbps Upstream Speeds a Reality

#1
nemesis.ie
Great to see this. How long it takes ISPs to implement will be another matter no doubt.
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#2
bonehead123
A.F.T. :eek:

Bad thing is, now the providers will have yet ANOTHER excuse to raise their rates AGAIN, saying that it will take xxx billions of dollars to implement the new standards
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#3
TheLostSwede
nemesis.ie, post: 3747023, member: 22637"
Great to see this. How long it takes ISPs to implement will be another matter no doubt.
Uhm, first of all, how long will it take the chip makers, back-end and the router makers to implement it? This is going to require a lot of new infrastructure and that doesn't happen over night.

Hopefully this will help improve latency on cable networks as well, but one can only dream...
Posted on Reply
#4
TheinsanegamerN
TheLostSwede, post: 3747029, member: 3382"
Uhm, first of all, how long will it take the chip makers, back-end and the router makers to implement it? This is going to require a lot of new infrastructure and that doesn't happen over night.

Hopefully this will help improve latency on cable networks as well, but one can only dream...
Convenient excuse.

In most of the areas of the USA, ISPs have still not saturated the upsteam bandwidth of DOCSIS 1.0, released in 1997. DOCSIS 1.0 specifies upstream of 10 Mbps. I have three providers, ATT, spectrum, and a local provider. Spectrum is 6 Mbps up max, local is 5, and ATT is 3, because the most they will sell you is 18/3.

DOCSIS 3.0 specifies 1.2GBps downstream and 200Mbps upstream, released in 2008. Short of the few GB fiber areas, most people come nowhere near that. DOCSIS 1, 1.1, and 2.0 all specified 40 down, and in many parts of the US, speeds faster then 25 are not available.

American ISPs have been too lazy to max out DOCSIS for almost two decades now. That wont change anytime soon. They have had 20 years, and still havent built up enough infrastructure to fully max DOCSIS 1.0, or if they have, they refuse to sell it.
Posted on Reply
#5
Lightofhonor
TheinsanegamerN, post: 3747032, member: 127292"
Convenient excuse.

In most of the areas of the USA, ISPs have still not saturated the upsteam bandwidth of DOCSIS 1.0, released in 1997. DOCSIS 1.0 specifies upstream of 10 Mbps. I have three providers, ATT, spectrum, and a local provider. Spectrum is 6 Mbps up max, local is 5, and ATT is 3, because the most they will sell you is 18/3.

DOCSIS 3.0 specifies 1.2GBps downstream and 200Mbps upstream, released in 2008. Short of the few GB fiber areas, most people come nowhere near that. DOCSIS 1, 1.1, and 2.0 all specified 40 down, and in many parts of the US, speeds faster then 25 are not available.

American ISPs have been too lazy to max out DOCSIS for almost two decades now. That wont change anytime soon. They have had 20 years, and still havent built up enough infrastructure to fully max DOCSIS 1.0, or if they have, they refuse to sell it.
While I agree that cable companies aren't doing as much as they could, remember that those numbers are theoretical maximums so those speeds are only available if you are close to the hub/system isn't under load/etc. 1gbps from xfinity is available for me, but I'm not paying $299 a month :D
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#6
TheLostSwede
Well, not all of humankind lives in the US of A, so some of us actually have DOCSIS 3.0 level solutions at an affordable price. I get 200/30Mbps for about $33 a month. Another $10 and I can have 300/30 and I know that there was an ISP here offering 1000/50 at one point over their DOCSIS 3.0 network, but it was too expensive for the local market, so they no longer offer it. Edit: Apparently they offer 800/150 now for the equivalent of $100 a month.

I'm sorry you get screwed by your service providers, but the implementation of a new standard is going to take time, regardless.
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#7
NTM2003
Me I’m just getting 100mbs speeds from cox cable from 2.5mbs and I’m excited to get that only $88 a month with taxes be installed next month they do offer a 1 gpbs but not in my area which sucks but I’m sure it’s coming, definitely can get a lot of games downloaded
Posted on Reply
#8
Brusfantomet
TheinsanegamerN, post: 3747032, member: 127292"
Convenient excuse.

In most of the areas of the USA, ISPs have still not saturated the upsteam bandwidth of DOCSIS 1.0, released in 1997. DOCSIS 1.0 specifies upstream of 10 Mbps. I have three providers, ATT, spectrum, and a local provider. Spectrum is 6 Mbps up max, local is 5, and ATT is 3, because the most they will sell you is 18/3.

DOCSIS 3.0 specifies 1.2GBps downstream and 200Mbps upstream, released in 2008. Short of the few GB fiber areas, most people come nowhere near that. DOCSIS 1, 1.1, and 2.0 all specified 40 down, and in many parts of the US, speeds faster then 25 are not available.

American ISPs have been too lazy to max out DOCSIS for almost two decades now. That wont change anytime soon. They have had 20 years, and still havent built up enough infrastructure to fully max DOCSIS 1.0, or if they have, they refuse to sell it.
Lightofhonor, post: 3747040, member: 63511"
While I agree that cable companies aren't doing as much as they could, remember that those numbers are theoretical maximums so those speeds are only available if you are close to the hub/system isn't under load/etc. 1gbps from xfinity is available for me, but I'm not paying $299 a month :D
You Americans are really getting screwed over at those prices. I pay equivalent of 30 USD/month for 250/20 witch puts me in DOCSIS 3.0 territory. Some places has the godlike 1000/1000 for 110 USD/month, or full speed DOCSIS 3.0 (1000/100) for 80 USD.

They actually lowered the prices around here recently, could be because 4G home internet is becoming a viable alternative to wired now.
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#9
R-T-B
Most cable companies don't even fully implement 4 docsis 3.0 upstream bonded connections, they fall back to 4X ATDMA on upstream AKA DOCSIS 2.0.

Sad, but true.
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#10
NTM2003
It says I will get speeds up to 100mbs watch it be 70-90-mbs but I really hope it tops off at 100mbs
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#11
SARVAMANGALAM
http://www.zdnet.com/article/m1-offers-10gbps-fibre-broadband-in-singapore/
The broadband offering will set customers back SG$189 per month over a 24-month contract.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/m1-launches-10gbps-symmetrical-service/
how is it possible?? becouse they have profit only 32Mil .. on china is it not too much on profit per Y.
how is it in usa?? ))) see profit on google,verizon or other meghalodons or others what leak profit to tax heavens..
bad crony capitallism in usa ..
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#12
Durvelle27
So what does this mean for current DOCSiS 3.1
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#13
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
It will probably take another 30 years for the UK to reach these speeds knowing how old our infrastructure is and also how lazy our ISPs are...

as far as i know there are only one or two ISPs that do gigabit speeds but even then service is only available in certain parts/areas of the UK and not nationwide....

Our Government love to wax lyrical about how we should be 'leading the class' given how important the UK is when it comes to global economics and world stage but we really dont see much getting done.
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#14
Prima.Vera
Durvelle27, post: 3747255, member: 107186"
So what does this mean for current DOCSiS 3.1
Best case, firmware upgrade. Worst case, complete device replacement.
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#15
Durvelle27
Prima.Vera, post: 3747290, member: 98685"
Best case, firmware upgrade. Worst case, complete device replacement.
Man and i just bought my modem
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#16
ironcerealbox
Depends on where you live in the USA. Where I live, Spectrum is a monopoly with a pretender competitor Century Link. I have Spectrum and I get 300/25 mbps for $89 per month. Century Link offers DSL service but that is limited to 24/? mbps. Spectrum in Austin, 60 miles from where I live, offers 600/50 mbps for the same price I pay currently. When it was Time Warner Cable here, the service was poo-poo with 50/5 being the fastest for $99. As soon as Charter and TWC (Time Warner Cable) merged, there has been a huge difference, for the better, in service and customer service. I see Spectrum trucks all-the-time working on infrastructure here now.

Hell, I raised hell all-the-time about a constant dropping of service when there was a lot of moisture (humidity) or when it was raining. TWC would show up and pretend to do something to get it back up even though I tell them that those damn line filters need to be replaced and the filter box they have next to an electric power line needs complete replacement as moisture is getting in there. I had to drone on this for 5+ years with TWC. As soon as I saw that merger finalize and about a year to pass, I gave them a ring and was surprised to get someone from New York. That person got a tech out to me in 2 days and they did, indeed, replace their hardware that is on their end. The entire neighborhood block thanked me for that. Some of my neighbors, I swear...gawd, they need to help themselves instead of having that stupid "ignorance is bliss" and "reliance on being spoon fed" mentality. However, I am digressing.

How long will it be like this before Spectrum reverts to the usual horrible ISP service and tactics is another story. Especially with them being the only real high-speed ISP locally. My advice is to constantly bitch and fight with your ISPs.
Posted on Reply
#17
Durvelle27
ironcerealbox, post: 3747443, member: 157944"
Depends on where you live in the USA. Where I live, Spectrum is a monopoly with a pretender competitor Century Link. I have Spectrum and I get 300/25 mbps for $89 per month. Century Link offers DSL service but that is limited to 24/? mbps. Spectrum in Austin, 60 miles from where I live, offers 600/50 mbps for the same price I pay currently. When it was Time Warner Cable here, the service was poo-poo with 50/5 being the fastest for $99. As soon as Charter and TWC (Time Warner Cable) merged, there has been a huge difference, for the better, in service and customer service. I see Spectrum trucks all-the-time working on infrastructure here now.

Hell, I raised hell all-the-time about a constant dropping of service when there was a lot of moisture (humidity) or when it was raining. TWC would show up and pretend to do something to get it back up even though I tell them that those damn line filters need to be replaced and the filter box they have next to an electric power line needs complete replacement as moisture is getting in there. I had to drone on this for 5+ years with TWC. As soon as I saw that merger finalize and about a year to pass, I gave them a ring and was surprised to get someone from New York. That person got a tech out to me in 2 days and they did, indeed, replace their hardware that is on their end. The entire neighborhood block thanked me for that. Some of my neighbors, I swear...gawd, they need to help themselves instead of having that stupid "ignorance is bliss" and "reliance on being spoon fed" mentality. However, I am digressing.

How long will it be like this before Spectrum reverts to the usual horrible ISP service and tactics is another story. Especially with them being the only real high-speed ISP locally. My advice is to constantly bitch and fight with your ISPs.
I'm in TN under Comcast for 200/30
Posted on Reply
#18
Jism
Prima.Vera, post: 3747290, member: 98685"
Best case, firmware upgrade. Worst case, complete device replacement.
ISP simply sends you out a new modem, install & play. That's all it takes basicly.

Cable in general is a great platform, but those theoretical top speeds cant be archieved since ISP's more and more send out digital TV signals over the same line as well. So in the end you'll have a smaller frequency that's available for your internet.
Posted on Reply
#19
ironcerealbox
Jism, post: 3747474, member: 91255"
ISP simply sends you out a new modem, install & play. That's all it takes basicly.

Cable in general is a great platform, but those theoretical top speeds cant be archieved since ISP's more and more send out digital TV signals over the same line as well. So in the end you'll have a smaller frequency that's available for your internet.
True dat. /nod

Even with my 300/25 speeds for DS/US, I will still struggle with 4K streaming at times. Granted, that could be other factors (y'know, throttling, that dirty word that no ISP will admit to).
Posted on Reply
#20
Jism
We have it better in EU due to the NTSC vs PAL standard and frequency's. I have a business cable subscription which sustains 400mbit down and 40mbit up. I'd really like to see that upstream go towards 100mbit's since i dont really care about download speeds.

Edit: Cable is still technical limited to what the 'hoods' cabinet is capable of. If that is underpowered, everyone in the same area basicly has a lesser connection.
Posted on Reply
#21
Durvelle27
ironcerealbox, post: 3747498, member: 157944"
True dat. /nod

Even with my 300/25 speeds for DS/US, I will still struggle with 4K streaming at times. Granted, that could be other factors (y'know, throttling, that dirty word that no ISP will admit to).
That's weird as i have a 200/30 through Comcast and streaming 2 4K streams (Netflix Ultra HD & Vudu) simultaneously and 1080P streaming my service never lags or even buffers. It's always smooth
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#22
OSdevr
I wonder what the Australians think of all this.
Posted on Reply
#23
StatuNascendi
TheinsanegamerN, post: 3747032, member: 127292"
Convenient excuse.

In most of the areas of the USA, ISPs have still not saturated the upsteam bandwidth of DOCSIS 1.0, released in 1997. DOCSIS 1.0 specifies upstream of 10 Mbps. I have three providers, ATT, spectrum, and a local provider. Spectrum is 6 Mbps up max, local is 5, and ATT is 3, because the most they will sell you is 18/3.

DOCSIS 3.0 specifies 1.2GBps downstream and 200Mbps upstream, released in 2008. Short of the few GB fiber areas, most people come nowhere near that. DOCSIS 1, 1.1, and 2.0 all specified 40 down, and in many parts of the US, speeds faster then 25 are not available.

American ISPs have been too lazy to max out DOCSIS for almost two decades now. That wont change anytime soon. They have had 20 years, and still havent built up enough infrastructure to fully max DOCSIS 1.0, or if they have, they refuse to sell it.
Docsis is always maxed due to null packets :D. To put it simply, that way Docsis service quality is always related to HFC network signal quality and not to amount of bandwidth.

Also, all bandwidth numbers above are shared between users in specific service group, individual users will never get those speeds, though sometimes you can pay extra for qos type prioritisation to get it close enough.

Service groups (SG) usually have anywhere from 100 to 500 members/users, but it is not so strange to see numbers well above that :(. When SG 'actual' bandwidth hit certain threshold, that network segment usually splits, but that process relies heavily on investment plan.
Posted on Reply
#24
ironcerealbox
Durvelle27, post: 3747505, member: 107186"
That's weird as i have a 200/30 through Comcast and streaming 2 4K streams (Netflix Ultra HD & Vudu) simultaneously and 1080P streaming my service never lags or even buffers. It's always smooth
Spectrum is notorious for advertising their packages as "up to x/y DS/US, depending on availability of bandwidth in surrounding areas" - which, during the mornings and days, is great (people going to work, kids going to school, etc.) but during the evenings, it really slows down as everyone is getting online at home. I have had to adjust accordingly because of this. Sometimes, dual or triple 4K streams going on, downloads, and uploads of data to research servers is just fine late-at-night. During the evenings, forget it.

I'm sure Comcast is, probably, better in their infrastructure than Spectrum is in areas that used to be Time Warner Cable. I have heard Spectrum areas that were Charter have not noticed huge differences but for us former TWC customers, we are seeing huge changes.
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#25
ironcerealbox
StatuNascendi, post: 3747557, member: 175027"
Docsis is always maxed due to null packets :D. To put it simply, that way Docsis service quality is always related to HFC network signal quality and not to amount of bandwidth.

Also, all bandwidth numbers above are shared between users in specific service group, individual users will never get those speeds, though sometimes you can pay extra for qos type prioritisation to get it close enough.

Service groups (SG) usually have anywhere from 100 to 500 members/users, but it is not so strange to see numbers well above that :(. When SG 'actual' bandwidth hit certain threshold, that network segment usually splits, but that process relies heavily on investment plan.
Good point! Thanks for reminding us or educating us on that topic. I'm somewhat knowledgeable with network infrastructures, protocols, and procedures but not nearly enough. I'm more on the CS and computer hardware side, along with maths.
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