Thursday, January 5th 2017

Ethernet Alliance Hails the Arrival of 200G and 400G Ethernet

The Ethernet Alliance, a global consortium dedicated to the continued success and advancement of Ethernet technologies, today commended the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Working Group on the approval of IEEE 802.3bs, Standard for Ethernet Amendment: Media Access Control Parameters, Physical Layers, and Management Parameters for 200 gigabit per second (Gb/s) and 400 Gb/s Operation. The specification of 200 gigabit Ethernet (200GbE) and 400 gigabit Ethernet (400GbE) operation across various interconnects will help satisfy mounting bandwidth demands from cloud-scale data centers, internet exchanges, co-location services, service provider networks, and other bandwidth intensive application spaces, while delivering better economies of scale and lower cost-per-port performance.

"IEEE 802.3bs represents a transformational moment in the move to next generation of networks. The delivery of 200G and 400G is arriving just in time to meet growing needs for reliable, high-speed connectivity from a diverse array of applications and markets," said John D'Ambrosia, chairman, Ethernet Alliance; and senior principal engineer, Huawei. "The exceptional effort resulting in the completion of this standard is only the start of the industry's investment in the networks of tomorrow. We've laid a firm foundation for 200G and 400G with our early interoperability demonstrations and plugfests, but it's time to kick things into high gear. The real work of testing and verifying multivendor interoperability begins now, and the Ethernet Alliance is ready. We look forward to building on past successes, and helping accelerate 200G and 400G Ethernet's rollout and adoption."
In March 2017, the Ethernet Alliance successfully demonstrated 400GbE during the Optical Society's optical networking and communications conference and expo, OFC 2017, as highlighted in an accompanying video. In keeping with its leadership role in educating the industry, market, and users, and supporting broad Ethernet interoperability, the organization is looking ahead to future interoperability testing events and demonstrations. Key stakeholders like OEMs, component vendors, and interconnect providers looking to get ahead of the 200GbE and 400GbE deployment curves are encouraged to do so by becoming Ethernet Alliance members and participating in upcoming events focused on multivendor interoperability.

For more information about the Ethernet Alliance, please visit http://www.ethernetalliance.org.
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15 Comments on Ethernet Alliance Hails the Arrival of 200G and 400G Ethernet

#1
wiak
now where the Fck is my 10Gbe ethernet cards, witches and routers?
Posted on Reply
#2
Easo
wiak said:
now where the Fck is my 10Gbe ethernet cards, witches and routers?
They are widely available. And it is not like you need 10Gbe card for a desktop computer, because even 1Gbit network is available in only a couple of places across the world.
Switches (witches :D) and routers? Have been on the market for a long, long time...
Posted on Reply
#3
bonehead123
now where the Fck is my 10Gbe ethernet cards, witches and routers?
Now if the ISP's could get over their fear of having like a gazillion customers banging down their doors demanding services which can actually allow you to take advantage of these advancements....

That would mean they would have to get up off of their lazy, money-grubbin asses and flip a few more switches in the backbones, which might take like 2.2 seconds of their precious time :(
Posted on Reply
#4
BadFrog
bonehead123 said:
Now if the ISP's could get over their fear of having like a gazillion customers banging down their doors demanding services which can actually allow you to take advantage of these advancements....

That would mean they would have to get up off of their lazy, money-grubbin asses and flip a few more switches in the backbones, which might take like 2.2 seconds of their precious time :(
After the FCC repealed net neutrality... ISP's speeds will get slower, less transparency and more expensive :D
Posted on Reply
#5
wiak
Easo said:
They are widely available. And it is not like you need 10Gbe card for a desktop computer, because even 1Gbit network is available in only a couple of places across the world.
Switches (witches :D) and routers? Have been on the market for a long, long time...
check the date on when gigabit was released too see how slow the industry has been adopting 10Gbe for the home market, it was only last year they started to put 10Ge nics on Threadripper/x399 and x299 boards
in the world of SSDS and RAID arrays that can be faster than 100 MB/s easily, heck even hard drives are around 180 MB/s nowadays

by your logic you would still love to have half duplex 10mbps ethernet connection over coax on your local in home/office lan?
Posted on Reply
#6
jateruy
wiak said:
check the date on when gigabit was released too see how slow the industry has been adopting 10Gbe for the home market, it was only last year they started to put 10Ge nics on Threadripper/x399 and x299 boards
in the world of SSDS and RAID arrays that can be faster than 100 MB/s easily, heck even hard drives are around 180 MB/s nowadays

by your logic you would still love to have half duplex 10mbps ethernet connection over coax on your local in home/office lan?
+This,

I had to run five 20ft GBE patches across two rooms just to get my workstation's backup and content access on NAS over this 5Gbp basis, using SMB3.0.
Posted on Reply
#7
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
BadFrog said:
After the FCC repealed net neutrality... ISP's speeds will get slower, less transparency and more expensive
It wasn't the Dark Ages when NN went into effect in the U.S. :rolleyes: It was about 30 months ago, in 2015. My rates did not go down and my speed didnt go up during NN, so I expect they will do the gradual 4-5% rise in price they always have, even during NN.
Posted on Reply
#8
Vayra86
rtwjunkie said:
It wasn't the Dark Ages when NN went into effect in the U.S. :rolleyes: It was about 30 months ago, in 2015. My rates did not go down and my speed didnt go up during NN, so I expect they will do the gradual 4-5% rise in price they always have, even during NN.
Net neutrality is not about the price of a basic plan.

Its about further taxing what you do with that basic plan. Hence the neutrality part. And to do that, you need to closely monitor or even enforce a users' actions on that connection/plan (meaning: full DPI on your users). Give it a couple years, then we'll talk again about your rates and freedom of movement on the net :) If you need a headstart on the outcome... look at the network coverage in less populated areas, that are less economically viable to cover, and you have an answer as to what'll happen, and what kind of deadlock it will be. Free markets didnt solve that problem and they never will. By abandoning NN, you're now guaranteed that smaller, new players on the market will also never be able to break the status quo. The market will stagnate and only the fat cats will survive and exercise their power.

Without NN you're basically back to the 56k modem era where connections are paid depending on their usage of bandwidth and latency requirements, its a way to fork the bill for network improvements to individual customers instead of the total network load and userbase. Without ANY guarantee you'll see an improvement, in fact, you just 'get what you pay for' which is what you've always had, except it used to be cheaper because it got paid collectively.

It works the same way with healthcare, insurance, and many other things. There are good reasons to do that collectively, and not doing it as such, is only based on individual greed and short term profit.
Posted on Reply
#9
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
Vayra86 said:
Without ANY guarantee you'll see an improvement, in fact, you just 'get what you pay for' which is what you've always had, except it used to be cheaper because it got paid collectively.
Actually our plans are the same after as they were during and before where I live. No cap, and you pay for the speed you want. I have the same services as I have always had here. And during NN, not one new internet provided showed up in the New Orleans area. It was still limited to the cable company or the phone company. Both have always offered multiple tiers so you pay for the plan you want. The real difference is the cable internet is capable of reaching much higher speeds.

My response to him though, was the tinfoil hat wearing type of complaint people are crying about, as if they had NN for "AGES and AGES, and it's all gone, look at the chaos we will have", when in fact it was less than 3 years. It was practically yesterday. Surely people's memories cannot be that deficient. :wtf: Can they?
Posted on Reply
#10
Easo
wiak said:
check the date on when gigabit was released too see how slow the industry has been adopting 10Gbe for the home market, it was only last year they started to put 10Ge nics on Threadripper/x399 and x299 boards
in the world of SSDS and RAID arrays that can be faster than 100 MB/s easily, heck even hard drives are around 180 MB/s nowadays

by your logic you would still love to have half duplex 10mbps ethernet connection over coax on your local in home/office lan?
ISP's do not provide 10Gbit. You can put all you want on greed, but the capacity is not there yet and I am not talking about USA, but, for example, Eastern Europe, which shits all over USA in terms of speed (because the network infrastructure is much newer and was made with healthy competition) It simply is not possible at the moment, nor is it actually needed. Home use is not the same as it is in datacenters.
Subjective experience - I upgraded from 100 to 250 mbit, not really feeling that difference.
Posted on Reply
#11
nemesis.ie
These 200 and 400Gbe technologies make it most definitely possible to give 10GBe out to the home. Upgraded backbones (which along with cloud infrastructure is the target audience I presume) could/should allow for upgraded end user speeds.

However, internet speed is not the only issue, ss was mentioned above, when we have 3GB/s+ speed drives in our machines it would be nice to have our backups done a little faster than 0.1GB/s or having to plug in USB drives etc.

I doubt anyone here would be happy if their GPU or CPU had progressed at the same speed - and it's not like the tech does not exist, it does, the price is just being kept (artificially?) high.
Posted on Reply
#12
evernessince
rtwjunkie said:
Actually our plans are the same after as they were during and before where I live. No cap, and you pay for the speed you want. I have the same services as I have always had here. And during NN, not one new internet provided showed up in the New Orleans area. It was still limited to the cable company or the phone company. Both have always offered multiple tiers so you pay for the plan you want. The real difference is the cable internet is capable of reaching much higher speeds.

My response to him though, was the tinfoil hat wearing type of complaint people are crying about, as if they had NN for "AGES and AGES, and it's all gone, look at the chaos we will have", when in fact it was less than 3 years. It was practically yesterday. Surely people's memories cannot be that deficient. :wtf: Can they?
Hey, you made a list of things NN didn't affect, good for you. Of course nothing changed on the surface, that was the point! It's misinformed people like this spreading false BS that make me facepalm.
Posted on Reply
#13
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
evernessince said:
Hey, you made a list of things NN didn't affect, good for you. Of course nothing changed on the surface, that was the point! It's misinformed people like this spreading false BS that make me facepalm.
Not misinformed. Nothing ever got a chance to get going in 30 months. We're in the same situation we always were. That's my point for the misinformed here in the U.S. that act like decades of NN has has been taken from them...when in reality they never had it.
Posted on Reply
#15
evernessince
rtwjunkie said:
Not misinformed. Nothing ever got a chance to get going in 30 months. We're in the same situation we always were. That's my point for the misinformed here in the U.S. that act like decades of NN has has been taken from them...when in reality they never had it.
That's because for people like me, we have been fighting to get NN in place for the better half of a decade. I'm sorry if my first post came off strong but I've been part of multiple organizations to get NN into place like FreePress and it was just erased like it was nothing. NN was about transparency and using that transpanrecy to keep the internet open. IMO it should have implemented unbundling like they have in the cell phone market but telecoms complained about that, even though they still called what we had too heavy handed regardless.
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