Sunday, January 14th 2018

Cherry Annnounces the Cherry MX Low Profile RGB Switches

CHERRY, the market leader and expert in mechanical switches in keyboards, is announcing the MX Low Profile RGB. This shallow switch features a brand-new design and combines the well-known characteristics of the MX switch with a low profile. This allows the implementation of mechanical keys in a much more compact format, making the CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB suitable not only for use in notebooks but also for building unusually thin high-end keyboards.

The CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB is the first truly new development in mechanical switches in more than 30 years. The company's R&D department has invested a lot of time and effort in achieving a total height of only 11.9 millimeters without compromising on characteristics and quality. The MX Low Profile RGB is about 35 percent shallower than the standard MX switches, and thanks to its unique design it can be used just as easily for mechanical keyboards in high-end notebooks as for unusually thin mechanical desktop keyboards. The new CHERRY switch was fully developed and built in Germany, its the "Made in Germany" seal representing the best product quality and the highest manufacturing precision.
Typical characteristics and Gold-Crosspoint technology
Despite its low height, the CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB offers the same perfect operation feeling that CHERRY's conventional switches have already established as a gold standard on the market. Although the actuation characteristics remain almost the same, the travel has been reduced from 4.0 to 3.2 millimeters. For a reliable operation, CHERRY has integrated its exclusive, high-precision and long-life Gold-Crosspoint technology. The contacts are self-cleaning and resistant to corrosion, with guarantees over 50 million keystrokes with no loss of quality. This also leads to a shorter bounce time for higher switching frequencies.

Housing with optimization for lighting
The housing for the CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB is transparent and designed for use with SMD LEDs. These compact LEDs sit directly on the PCB to benefit the shallow design of the keyboard. The design of the housing is optimized to ensure a uniform illumination of the entire key cap and to represent all 16.8 million colors of the RGB spectrum accurately.

CHERRY MX Low Profile RGB Red as first variant
The MX Low Profile RGB Red is the first variant that CHERRY will offer. It has the same properties as the regular MX Red variant, such as a linear switching characteristic and an actuation force of 45 centinewtons, making the MX Low Profile RGB Red perfectly suitable for gamers and fast typists.
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22 Comments on Cherry Annnounces the Cherry MX Low Profile RGB Switches

#1
lynx29
::crickets chirping::
Posted on Reply
#2
Katanai
This looks good if it's not implemented using those awful flat keys everyone is using now. With those it won't make much of a difference. If they use slightly taller keys that have a concave face it would make a really good laptop keyboard...
Posted on Reply
#3
lynx29
"Katanai said:
This looks good if it's not implemented using those awful flat keys everyone is using now. With those it won't make much of a difference. If they use slightly taller keys that have a concave face it would make a really good laptop keyboard...
As someone who games on a 2 grand laptop, I can say I am never ever gaming on a laptop again. lol I don't care if they offer me pure gold created from heaven keyboards. but to each their own.
Posted on Reply
#4
Katanai
"lynx29 said:
As someone who games on a 2 grand laptop, I can say I am never ever gaming on a laptop again. lol I don't care if they offer me pure gold created from heaven keyboards. but to each their own.
Well, why don't you get a keyboard and a monitor for it though? It would be like just a desktop then. I really hate even typing on laptop keyboards nowadays as I can't find the keys without looking because they are so flat...
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
"Katanai said:
This looks good if it's not implemented using those awful flat keys everyone is using now. With those it won't make much of a difference. If they use slightly taller keys that have a concave face it would make a really good laptop keyboard...
True, I hate those chiclet style keys as well.

In other news, of course they announce these now, it's been a month since I finally bit the bullet and gave up on slim keyboard to get a mechanical one instead. Which is really not worth its money, I might add.
Posted on Reply
#6
notb
"Katanai said:
This looks good if it's not implemented using those awful flat keys everyone is using now. With those it won't make much of a difference. If they use slightly taller keys that have a concave face it would make a really good laptop keyboard...
What's wrong with flat keys?

I just bought a mechanical keyboard - just to check what I've been missing for the last 15 years, when I switched to low-travel keyboards (with a huge relief!).
Maybe they somehow got better, which I doubt. But since I'm thinking about turning laptop-only since 2019, this was the last chance. :-)
Posted on Reply
#7
lynx29
"Katanai said:
Well, why don't you get a keyboard and a monitor for it though? It would be like just a desktop then. I really hate even typing on laptop keyboards nowadays as I can't find the keys without looking because they are so flat...
Won't fix the thermal throttling and high temps.
Posted on Reply
#8
El_MUERkO
I'm actually hyped for this, I enjoy typing on chiclet keyboards :)
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
"El_MUERkO said:
I'm actually hyped for this, I enjoy typing on chiclet keyboards :)
Just saying, but I hope everyone realizes that no matter the size of of the switch, manufacturers can still put any type of keycaps on on top. Sure, standard sized switches don't make much sense with a chiclet key cap, that's why you don't see many of those. But these low profile switches can accommodate any key cap type (and they probably will).
Posted on Reply
#10
Prince Valiant
"notb said:
What's wrong with flat keys?

I just bought a mechanical keyboard - just to check what I've been missing for the last 15 years, when I switched to low-travel keyboards (with a huge relief!).
Maybe they somehow got better, which I doubt. But since I'm thinking about turning laptop-only since 2019, this was the last chance. :)
They're uncomfortable to type on for extended periods? Especially if there's little to no key travel.
Posted on Reply
#11
PowerPC
"Prince Valiant said:
They're uncomfortable to type on for extended periods? Especially if there's little to no key travel.
Disagree? I find them more comfortable because of the same reason you find them uncomfortable. Some people like a higher mouse sensitivity, some don't. This is the same discussion that leads nowhere.. Different strokes for different folks (literally).
Posted on Reply
#12
Katanai
"notb said:
What's wrong with flat keys?
The fact that they are flat. :D You cannot find the keys by touch alone, you have to look for them. That's why you will never see a pro player use a flat keyboard. On a normal keyboard you can recognize every key you touch without looking. Because of the concave shape and the position of your hand every key feels different as the corners and sides you touch are different depending on where they are positioned. On a flat keyboard this is much harder to do as there are no corners and edges you can immediately feel. I am not a keyboard snob or anything, I can use any keyboard, membrane or mechanical, as long as they have standard height keys...
Posted on Reply
#13
notb
"Prince Valiant said:
They're uncomfortable to type on for extended periods? Especially if there's little to no key travel.
What? :-D
Flat keys dominated offices years ago. People are using them for 8+ hours a day - some a lot longer.
You've been under a rock for 10 years and missed the fact that we're mostly using notebooks now?
"Katanai said:
The fact that they are flat. :D You cannot find the keys by touch alone, you have to look for them.
Of course you can. It's muscle memory - your brain knows where the keys are.
I don't get the idea behind "finding keys". You're counting them or what? "s" is 2 keys left from "f"?
That's why you will never see a pro player use a flat keyboard.
We're talking about typing or playing?
And while I'm not really following "pro gaming", I do see a lot of gaming notebooks. And flat gaming keyboards. Who would these be for...? :-)

If you watch how typists work, they're hitting keys from above - not sliding fingers over them. They simply know where to struck.
I can totally believe that gamers do it differently. When I play and WSAD is for movement and ~10 or so keys around are for other actions, I do tend to "count" or slide fingers. That's simply because I'm not thinking "E" but "use" and the muscle memory is not associated.
I am not a keyboard snob or anything, I can use any keyboard, membrane or mechanical, as long as they have standard height keys...
So maybe it's you, not the rest of the world? :-P
Have you ever tried flat keyboards? Either notebook or a discrete one? What if it turns out that you can type just as well - maybe even better and for longer?
Posted on Reply
#14
Katanai
"notb said:
What? :-D
Flat keys dominated offices years ago. People are using them for 8+ hours a day - some a lot longer.
You've been under a rock for 10 years and missed the fact that we're mostly using notebooks now?

Of course you can. It's muscle memory - your brain knows where the keys are.
I don't get the idea behind "finding keys". You're counting them or what? "s" is 2 keys left from "f"?

We're talking about typing or playing?
And while I'm not really following "pro gaming", I do see a lot of gaming notebooks. And flat gaming keyboards. Who would these be for...? :)

If you watch how typists work, they're hitting keys from above - not sliding fingers over them. They simply know where to struck.
I can totally believe that gamers do it differently. When I play and WSAD is for movement and ~10 or so keys around are for other actions, I do tend to "count" or slide fingers. That's simply because I'm not thinking "E" but "use" and the muscle memory is not associated.

So maybe it's you, not the rest of the world? :p
Have you ever tried flat keyboards? Either notebook or a discrete one? What if it turns out that you can type just as well - maybe even better and for longer?
Listen dude you are very aggressive with you preference for your inferior technology. So let me be a bit aggressive as well: No I am not living under a rock like you are. I know that no gaming tournament is held on goddamn laptops and any pro player would laugh in your face if you told them half the stupid things you wrote here. I have answered your question in a very polite manner. And now you tell me I'm living under a rock and it's just me that likes normal keyboards!? Here buddy, these are the keyboards we use in 2018, because they are vastly superior to the cheap crap you use. Do you see one flat keyboard there? No? Maybe it's just you then...

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/gaming-keyboards
https://steelseries.com/gaming-keyboards
https://www.logitechg.com/en-us/gaming-keyboards
https://www.qpad.com/shop/en/6-keyboards
http://tesorotec.com/keyboards-new/
http://www.coolermaster.com/product/Lines/keyboards/
http://cougargaming.com/products/keyboards/
http://www.ttesports.com/productlist.aspx?c=2
https://www.razerzone.com/gaming-keyboards
Posted on Reply
#15
bug
@notb I think he's talking about touch typing, but that's based on keys F and J having a small ridge.
Also, I'm pretty sure it's just a matter of habit. I've been using a classic keyboard for like 20 years before Apple made chiclets popular and I find them very unnatural to use. Not even Apple has claimed they're superior in any way. Just that they allowed the laptops to be thinner, which yet another thing I don't really get (I get that a 15mm thick laptop is easier to carry than a 40mm thick one, but why 9mm is considered more portable than 11mm is beyond me).
Posted on Reply
#16
Katanai
"bug said:
@notb I think he's talking about touch typing, but that's based on keys F and J having a small ridge.
Touch typing relies on much more than those two small ridges. Do a simple test: Keep your left hand in the normal position you keep it while typing. Don't move the wrist. Then take your index finger and touch Q, then W, then E and so on until Y. You will see that because your finger is moving into a different position, each key will feel different. When you touch Q you will feel the lower right corner sticking out. When you touch W you will feel it less. When you touch E it will be directly from underneath it and you will feel no corner at all. Then as you move to the right you will feel the lower left corner of the keys sticking out. This is a thing most people use for guidance when they use a keyboard without even knowing it. This is one of the things that is missing on flat keyboards. Another big one would be that the concave shape of the keys also guides your finger so that it presses exactly in the middle of the key each time. This means that each key press is consistent and should register the same way each time. On a flat keyboard, you can press on the corner of a button and it doesn't register the key press or does so in a weird way. I could go on and on about this but I think I've wasted enough time on this subject...
Posted on Reply
#17
Prince Valiant
"notb said:
What? :-D
Flat keys dominated offices years ago. People are using them for 8+ hours a day - some a lot longer.
You've been under a rock for 10 years and missed the fact that we're mostly using notebooks now?

Of course you can. It's muscle memory - your brain knows where the keys are.
I don't get the idea behind "finding keys". You're counting them or what? "s" is 2 keys left from "f"?

We're talking about typing or playing?
And while I'm not really following "pro gaming", I do see a lot of gaming notebooks. And flat gaming keyboards. Who would these be for...? :)

If you watch how typists work, they're hitting keys from above - not sliding fingers over them. They simply know where to struck.
I can totally believe that gamers do it differently. When I play and WSAD is for movement and ~10 or so keys around are for other actions, I do tend to "count" or slide fingers. That's simply because I'm not thinking "E" but "use" and the muscle memory is not associated.

So maybe it's you, not the rest of the world? :p
Have you ever tried flat keyboards? Either notebook or a discrete one? What if it turns out that you can type just as well - maybe even better and for longer?
Offices using something doesn't mean it's good or bad. Anyway, I was only speaking from personal experience. I moved to mechanical years ago and my fingers haven't hurt since.
Posted on Reply
#18
notb
"Prince Valiant said:
Offices using something doesn't mean it's good or bad. Anyway, I was only speaking from personal experience. I moved to mechanical years ago and my fingers haven't hurt since.
Well, it kind of is, because office equipment tends to be optimized for comfort and intensive, long-time work. Gaming stuff is always compromised by some trends or funky looks. Like the gaming chairs, which are not even close to how an ergonomic chair should look.

"Katanai said:
Listen dude you are very aggressive with you preference for your inferior technology. So let me be a bit aggressive as well: No I am not living under a rock like you are. I know that no gaming tournament is held on goddamn laptops and any pro player would laugh in your face if you told them half the stupid things you wrote here.
But I was talking about touch typing, i.e. writing. I've even said that gamers use keyboards differently and then your theory about how keys feel makes some sense.

"Katanai said:
Touch typing relies on much more than those two small ridges. Do a simple test: Keep your left hand in the normal position you keep it while typing. Don't move the wrist. Then take your index finger and touch Q, then W, then E and so on until Y. You will see that because your finger is moving into a different position, each key will feel different. When you touch Q you will feel the lower right corner sticking out. When you touch W you will feel it less. When you touch E it will be directly from underneath it and you will feel no corner at all. Then as you move to the right you will feel the lower left corner of the keys sticking out. This is a thing most people use for guidance when they use a keyboard without even knowing it.
Seriously? Typing with your index finger? :-D
This is not how touch typing is meant to work, which really makes your argument pointless...
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
"Katanai said:
Touch typing relies on much more than those two small ridges. Do a simple test: Keep your left hand in the normal position you keep it while typing. Don't move the wrist. Then take your index finger and touch Q, then W, then E and so on until Y. You will see that because your finger is moving into a different position, each key will feel different. When you touch Q you will feel the lower right corner sticking out. When you touch W you will feel it less. When you touch E it will be directly from underneath it and you will feel no corner at all. Then as you move to the right you will feel the lower left corner of the keys sticking out. This is a thing most people use for guidance when they use a keyboard without even knowing it. This is one of the things that is missing on flat keyboards. Another big one would be that the concave shape of the keys also guides your finger so that it presses exactly in the middle of the key each time. This means that each key press is consistent and should register the same way each time. On a flat keyboard, you can press on the corner of a button and it doesn't register the key press or does so in a weird way. I could go on and on about this but I think I've wasted enough time on this subject...
You don't use your index finger to press Q when you touch type. End of story.
Posted on Reply
#20
Katanai
"notb said:

Seriously? Typing with your index finger? :-D
This is not how touch typing is meant to work, which really makes your argument pointless...
"bug said:
You don't use your index finger to press Q when you touch type. End of story.
I have wasted my time with you here. If you fail to understand the simple fact that each key on a normal keyboard feels different no matter what finger you use to press it because it has a 3 dimensional shape unlike a flat key there is nothing someone could explain to you that you would understand. It seems I tried to explain something to advanced for you to comprehend. This will be my last post in this thread as it seems that I have no one to talk to here that understands some basic concepts...
Posted on Reply
#21
bug
"Katanai said:
I have wasted my time with you here. If you fail to understand the simple fact that each key on a normal keyboard feels different no matter what finger you use to press it because it has a 3 dimensional shape unlike a flat key there is nothing someone could explain to you that you would understand. It seems I tried to explain something to advanced for you to comprehend. This will be my last post in this thread as it seems that I have no one to talk to here that understands some basic concepts...
The basic concept is touch typing is based on position, not feel. You're not trying to explain something too advanced, you're simply trying to explain something irrelevant to the topic at hand.
Posted on Reply
#22
notb
"Katanai said:
I have wasted my time with you here.

That's not a big deal. Let's hope you haven't wasted a lot more by using a keyboard in some really weird way...
No seppuku, please. You're late for the Blue Monday anyway. :-P
Posted on Reply
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