Wednesday, March 14th 2018

Raspberry Pi Foundation Announces New, Pi 3 B+ Model - Same Price, Better Features

This article is devoted to all of the tech enthusiasts in our forums that just love to tinker with technology themselves. There are some pretty cool projects users can use their Raspberry Pis for - smart mirrors, home-made security systems, even Philips Ambilight clones for their PCs and televisions. The Raspberry Pi foundation has been making strides, in line with tech advancements ever since the introduction of their very first Raspberry Pi model, and have now announced yet another iteration of the popular compute platform: the Pi 3 B+.

The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ packs some improved hardware - it runs its quad core 64-bit Cortex-A53 processor at 1.4GHz (versus 1.2 GHz previously), and a dual-band controller that now supports 2.4/5GHz 802.11b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2 (up from 2.4GHz and Bluetooth 4.1). Other specs are unchanged: there's an Ethernet port, 4x USB 2 ports, a 40-pin GPIO connector, 1x HDMI video output, camera and touchscreen ports, stereo/composite video, and a microSD slot for its software and operating system. For these improvements, users will be requested to shell out exactly the same amount of greenbacks as before: $35.
Sources: via Ars Technica, Raspberry Pi Foundation
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18 Comments on Raspberry Pi Foundation Announces New, Pi 3 B+ Model - Same Price, Better Features

#2
_JP_
Awesome!! Can't wait to get my hands on it!
Posted on Reply
#3
dj-electric
USB3, 2GB LPDDR3, +20% CPU power and ill buy for life.
I know its hard for 35$... well, not really. What am i saying. I'll keep waiting
Posted on Reply
#4
Disparia
Ars"
It uses the same 5V/2.5A power as before and will also support power-over-Ethernet with an accessory (coming soon) sold separately.
I will be keeping an eye open for that.
Posted on Reply
#6
StrayKAT
I like my Pi for gaming emulators, but it never really felt like a "tinkering" platform. It's all pretty set up, as is.

I don't know? I know it was originally designed for education, but I'm not sure what kids are really learning. Unless it's tinkering with the software and OS.
Posted on Reply
#7
Chaitanya
StrayKAT, post: 3813185, member: 174092"
I like my Pi for gaming emulators, but it never really felt like a "tinkering" platform. It's all pretty set up, as is.

I don't know? I know it was originally designed for education, but I'm not sure what kids are really learning. Unless it's tinkering with the software and OS.
Tinkering with programming and using GPIO maybe some fun electronic projects. That is more than enough to get kids interested in programming and computer sciences.
Posted on Reply
#8
TheLostSwede
Bruno Vieira, post: 3813165, member: 166716"
The POE adapter if very expensive for the moment, i'm gonna keep mine

https://uk.pi-supply.com/products/pi-poe-switch-hat-power-over-ethernet-for-raspberry-pi

+1
Wrong product. This is the official one - https://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-88914/l/raspberry-pi-3-model-b-plus-b-poe-power-over-ethernet-hat?ICID=rpimain-featured-products
It's $20+tax.
Also no need for any additional wires, as it's using the new 4-pin connector on the RPi.
Posted on Reply
#9
Readlight
Include charger cheap mobile 10 euro chargers will blow up. +fast micro sd and case.
It has slowest mobile phone processor.
Posted on Reply
#11
Disparia
TheLostSwede, post: 3813282, member: 3382"
Wrong product. This is the official one - https://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-88914/l/raspberry-pi-3-model-b-plus-b-poe-power-over-ethernet-hat?ICID=rpimain-featured-products
It's $20+tax.
Also no need for any additional wires, as it's using the new 4-pin connector on the RPi.
A long time ago I had looked into this but the only solution I could find was built-on-demand for $100+ USD and it was the style with the short cable. A $20 cable-less PoE adapter is very appealing.

Reeves81x, post: 3813695, member: 159783"
Cool. OrangePi still has the best feature set tho ;)
http://www.orangepi.org/Orange Pi RK3399/
http://www.orangepi.org/orangepiplus2/
Including the Tinker Board S?

A couple years ago I put together a Retro-Pie Pi-2 build for my brother-in-law. I'm thinking of building him an upgraded version using a Tinker Board S or perhaps this Orange Pi. The R-Pi 3B+ would be the easy answer, but if I can tell him that it's the best, he'll be able to rub it in.
Posted on Reply
#12
Reeves81x
Jizzler, post: 3813801, member: 41756"
A long time ago I had looked into this but the only solution I could find was built-on-demand for $100+ USD and it was the style with the short cable. A $20 cable-less PoE adapter is very appealing.



Including the Tinker Board S?

A couple years ago I put together a Retro-Pie Pi-2 build for my brother-in-law. I'm thinking of building him an upgraded version using a Tinker Board S or perhaps this Orange Pi. The R-Pi 3B+ would be the easy answer, but if I can tell him that it's the best, he'll be able to rub it in.
The orangepi has by far the most features for the $ and it runs raspbian, android and linux. Also the Tinker Board S has A RK3288 CPU and the OrangePi RK3399 has.. well, a RK3399 more powerful 6 core 2GHz CPU (or 4+2 to be more precise) plus hdmi in and out and SATA, mini PCIe.


But its a little bigger Than the OrangePi Plus2.



I have the Plus 2 bought it last year, works fine, use it for my TV in my bedroom to watch netflix, Kodi.

another interesting little board lacks wifi tho.

http://www.hardkernel.com/main/products/prdt_info.php?g_code=G143452239825
Posted on Reply
#13
TheLostSwede
Reeves81x, post: 3813817, member: 159783"
The orangepi has by far the most features for the $ and it runs raspbian, android and linux. Also the Tinker Board S has A RK3288 CPU and the OrangePi RK3399 has.. well, a RK3399 more powerful 6 core 2GHz CPU (or 4+2 to be more precise) plus hdmi in and out and SATA, mini PCIe.


But its a little bigger Than the OrangePi Plus2.



I have the Plus 2 bought it last year, works fine, use it for my TV in my bedroom to watch netflix, Kodi.

another interesting little board lacks wifi tho.

http://www.hardkernel.com/main/products/prdt_info.php?g_code=G143452239825
You're aware that the RK3399 all go for $99+++ right? Orange Pi were stingy and only put 2GB on their board to keep costs down, which makes no sense when you got a Cortex-A72 in there.
Also, the Chinese boards are poorly supported by the manufacturers, so good luck when something doesn't work.
The only good thing is that the RK3399 is on Rockchip's open source list, so they should be doing some software development for it and the drivers should be available, unlike many of their other parts.
Posted on Reply
#14
Reeves81x
TheLostSwede, post: 3813988, member: 3382"
You're aware that the RK3399 all go for $99+++ right? Orange Pi were stingy and only put 2GB on their board to keep costs down, which makes no sense when you got a Cortex-A72 in there.
Also, the Chinese boards are poorly supported by the manufacturers, so good luck when something doesn't work.
The only good thing is that the RK3399 is on Rockchip's open source list, so they should be doing some software development for it and the drivers should be available, unlike many of their other parts.
you know the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ only has 1gb of ram right? No h265 support either. also show me one for less than 50$ US.
As for th OPi plus2, Of course it's chinese so you have to deal with the chinese BS. But mine works. lol. and it`s so cheap, who would bother sending it back. Never had any issues with drivers. It is a viable alternative, but it`s china so of course it`s a gamble. The RK3399 is a bigger gamble at 100$.
Posted on Reply
#15
Prima.Vera
ZeppMan217, post: 3813043, member: 85360"
Still USB2?
USB 3.0 has some different power requirements.
Posted on Reply
#16
TheLostSwede
Reeves81x, post: 3814010, member: 159783"
you know the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ only has 1gb of ram right? No h265 support either. also show me one for less than 50$ US.
As for th OPi plus2, Of course it's chinese so you have to deal with the chinese BS. But mine works. lol. and it`s so cheap, who would bother sending it back. Never had any issues with drivers. It is a viable alternative, but it`s china so of course it`s a gamble. The RK3399 is a bigger gamble at 100$.
The RPi as a whole is a "toy". That said, someone willing to spend $35 on one is most likely looking for just that, a toy.

Orange Pi did a crap job compared to several other RK3399 boards. To date, the best supported one seems to be the Firefly RK3399 , but it's more expensive.
Does the HDMI in actually work on your board?

Pine64 will supposedly launch an RK3399 board in April from as little as $59-65, but the layout leaves a lot to be desired - https://www.cnx-software.com/2018/01/29/pine64-to-release-rockpro64-boards-based-on-rockchip-rk3399-and-rk3399pro-for-60-and-up/

The reason the RPi is popular is because it has support from the RPi Foundation and as such has grown a large community behind it. The product itself might very well be great for education purposes and retro gaming emulators, but it's not particularly good for anything else imho. Sadly it's the go to platform for a lot of software, as there aren't very many other boards that are so widely available either.

Sadly none of the Chinese board makers want to spend the man power and resources needed to compete with the RPi on "equal" terms when it comes to software support and community, so they just end up being cheap, but mostly inferior products, regardless how good the hardware is.
Posted on Reply
#17
Reeves81x
TheLostSwede, post: 3814043, member: 3382"
The RPi as a whole is a "toy". That said, someone willing to spend $35 on one is most likely looking for just that, a toy.

Orange Pi did a crap job compared to several other RK3399 boards. To date, the best supported one seems to be the Firefly RK3399 , but it's more expensive.
Does the HDMI in actually work on your board?

Pine64 will supposedly launch an RK3399 board in April from as little as $59-65, but the layout leaves a lot to be desired - https://www.cnx-software.com/2018/01/29/pine64-to-release-rockpro64-boards-based-on-rockchip-rk3399-and-rk3399pro-for-60-and-up/

The reason the RPi is popular is because it has support from the RPi Foundation and as such has grown a large community behind it. The product itself might very well be great for education purposes and retro gaming emulators, but it's not particularly good for anything else imho. Sadly it's the go to platform for a lot of software, as there aren't very many other boards that are so widely available either.

Sadly none of the Chinese board makers want to spend the man power and resources needed to compete with the RPi on "equal" terms when it comes to software support and community, so they just end up being cheap, but mostly inferior products, regardless how good the hardware is.
Agreed,
I don't have the OPi RK3399 so i can't comment on its functionality. I have the Plus 2. No input, everything else works as it should tho. Have a RPi 3b that i bought shortly after it's release. The lack of simple things such as even an on/off switch bothered me, even if it is a toy. I have found the Plus 2 to be a bit more responsive mostly due to the eMMC and additional 1 gb of ram. I paid $46.99 US for the RPi and 39.99 for the OPi. I have Android 4.4.4 on the OPi. seems to work quite well. A cheap android box for my bedroom tv was all i was looking for from the OPi. :)
That Pine64 RK3399 has some promising features, I think the layout is so odd in order to accommodate a heatsink over the cpu/ram.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheLostSwede
Reeves81x, post: 3814046, member: 159783"
Agreed,
I don't have the OPi RK3399 so i can't comment on its functionality. I have the Plus 2. No input, everything else works as it should tho. Have a RPi 3b that i bought shortly after it's release. The lack of simple things such as even an on/off switch bothered me, even if it is a toy. I have found the Plus 2 to be a bit more responsive mostly due to the eMMC and additional 1 gb of ram. I paid $46.99 US for the RPi and 39.99 for the OPi. I have Android 4.4.4 on the OPi. seems to work quite well. A cheap android box for my bedroom tv was all i was looking for from the OPi. :)
That Pine64 RK3399 has some promising features, I think the layout is so odd in order to accommodate a heatsink over the cpu/ram.
Ah, sorry, I misunderstood, I thought you had the RK3399 board.

eMMC is not just going to make the software on the board more responsive, but as eMMC features a host controller that manages the NAND, which in turn means you won't end up with problem of dead micro SD cards after a few months of write intensive usage.

Another advantage with the better AllWinner and Rockchip based boards is that they offer true Gigabit speed on the Ethernet side, whereas the RPi is always going to suffer, as it has a single USB 2.0 lane which is shared between Ethernet and anything you connect to the USB bus. The Broadcom SoC they use is truly a terrible piece of engineering and this latest revision doesn't appear to change that.
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