Tuesday, May 15th 2018

Sparton Corporation Introduces a New 24" Rugged 4K Military LCD Display

Sparton Corporation under the brand Aydin Displays, a leader in the ruggedized displays market introduces a 24" Rack/Console Mount Rugged 4k Military LCD Display. The model 4k24N boasts an unmatched picture clarity with an ultra high definition native resolution of 3840 x 2160, which is twice that of most ruggedized displays.

This 4k Military Flat Panel Display is designed for Rack/Console mounting and features PCAP multi-touch screen. It is designed and built to weather the extremes of temperature, moisture, vibration and shock during crucial military missions. This allows the user ultimate interactivity within a multitude of operations, whether it be shipboard, airborne or ground mobile applications.
"With stylish body lines, a seamless bezel to touch interface, the modern look stands out against our standard Defense products," said Louis Houde, Rugged Electronics General Manager. "We really thought outside the box with this one."

Well-equipped the 4k24N has multiple video inputs such as a Display Port, VGA, DVI and two HDMI ports and Parallel Connectors. The 4k24N is designed to meet a myriad of rigorous military requirements which include: MIL-STD-810G (Drip & Sand/Dust), MIL-S-901D (Shock), MIL-STD-167-1A Type 1 (Vibration) and MIL-STD-461F (EMI).

The 4k24N adds to the Aydin Defense product line which comes in a variety of sizes ranging from 10" to 65". Aydin Displays has been designing and supplying ruggedized displays, smart displays / thin client displays and computer workstations for military programs for more than 50 years.

Product Series Features
  • 4k Ultra High Definition, 3840 x 2160 Resolution
  • Multi-Touch Screen-PCAP (USB)
  • Rack / Console Mount
  • Sleek, Modern Design
  • LED Backlight
  • Convenient Front OSD Controls
  • Designed and Built to Military Standards
  • DVI-D, VGA, Display Port and HDMI Video Connectors
  • Parallel Connectors
Add your own comment

16 Comments on Sparton Corporation Introduces a New 24" Rugged 4K Military LCD Display

#1
Durvelle27
Wait so it’s a 4K display but has DVI and VGA still

Ancient times
Posted on Reply
#2
Sp33d Junki3
"Durvelle27 said:
Wait so it’s a 4K display but has DVI and VGA still

Ancient times
Yes as this is not a gaming monitor. Many older parts may not even have DP/HDMI.
That need the higher res to have multiple images on screen.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
"Sp33d Junki3 said:
Yes as this is not a gaming monitor. Many older parts may not even have DP/HDMI.
That need the higher res to have multiple images on screen.
Wth are you talking about? VGA and DVI cannot drive 4k@60Hz. DVI might do it at 30Hz, but it's still beyond what the spec says so any implementation would be hit-and-miss.
Posted on Reply
#4
Sp33d Junki3
"bug said:
Wth are you talking about? VGA and DVI cannot drive 4k@60Hz. DVI might do it at 30Hz, but it's still beyond what the spec says so any implementation would be hit-and-miss.
60 or 30hz do not matter for this type of screen for a certain market that is for.
Again it is not for the typical gamer. This is for the business/military field that is in.
Posted on Reply
#5
Durvelle27
"bug said:
Wth are you talking about? VGA and DVI cannot drive 4k@60Hz. DVI might do it at 30Hz, but it's still beyond what the spec says so any implementation would be hit-and-miss.
VGA Max does 1920x1080
DVI Max does 2560x1600 Dual link
Posted on Reply
#6
Caring1
The monitor might be military standards, but the display port and HDMI ports look standard to me.
So you're rattling around in a tank in enemy territory, and the cable falls out due to vibration ...oops.
Posted on Reply
#7
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
"Caring1 said:
The monitor might be military standards, but the display port and HDMI ports look standard to me.
So you're rattling around in a tank in enemy territory, and the cable falls out due to vibration ...oops.
This would be set up in any number of Command Posts or Forward Support Bases, not used on the move in an armored vehicle. This would get packed up and set up as those bases move forward or rearward.
Posted on Reply
#8
Caring1
"rtwjunkie said:
This would be set up in any number of Command Posts or Forward Support Bases, not used on the move in an armored vehicle. This would get packed up and set up as those bases move forward or rearward.
Quite a lot of armoured vehicles now rely on tech to guide them, this includes cameras externally and displays in the vehicles. Although I admit 24" may be a bit big, smaller sizes are generally used from what I have seen.
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
"Sp33d Junki3 said:
60 or 30hz do not matter for this type of screen for a certain market that is for.
Again it is not for the typical gamer. This is for the business/military field that is in.
Ok, please elaborate.
Posted on Reply
#10
BadFrog
Have you guys ever thought that maybe the MAX resolution for the display is 4k, but it can run OTHER resolutions such as 1080 that VGA and DVI could carry the signal for.....
Posted on Reply
#11
Wolflow
"Caring1 said:
The monitor might be military standards, but the display port and HDMI ports look standard to me.
So you're rattling around in a tank in enemy territory, and the cable falls out due to vibration ...oops.
Precisely why the DVI connector could be mandatory : remember HDMI is not that different.

VGA is another story, though, and here we have to keep in mind this "protocol" would be an issue by itself with EMI (could be ok for OSD/overlay).
Posted on Reply
#12
bug
"BadFrog said:
Have you guys ever thought that maybe the MAX resolution for the display is 4k, but it can run OTHER resolutions such as 1080 that VGA and DVI could carry the signal for.....
That goes for any LCD display out there. And all of them look horrible when not used at their native resolution.
Still, unless someone specifically requested, it doesn't make sense to add interfaces that can't fully exploit the hardware. Then again, if this is the military, this may indeed be a specific requirement.
Posted on Reply
#13
R-T-B
"bug said:
That goes for any LCD display out there. And all of them look horrible when not used at their native resolution.
See, 1080 pretty much is a native res of 4k, and 720p of 1440p, etc. They fit into the res in even numbers and should look crisp if the scaler isn't moronic. (a lot are though).
Posted on Reply
#14
bug
"R-T-B said:
See, 1080 pretty much is a native res of 4k, and 720p of 1440p, etc. They fit into the res in even numbers and should look crisp if the scaler isn't moronic. (a lot are though).
Yeah, but you have to upscale in the video driver. If monitors see something below the native resolution, they may try to upscale themselves and that usually leads to loss of sharpness (at best).
Posted on Reply
#15
R-T-B
"bug said:
Yeah, but you have to upscale in the video driver. If monitors see something below the native resolution, they may try to upscale themselves and that usually leads to loss of sharpness (at best).
Not at native integers. There is literally an even number of pixels to split. No sharpness lost.

But few monitors do this right, so really, you are correct.
Posted on Reply
#16
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
"bug said:
Ok, please elaborate.
If they're being bought it bulk they might just use it anywhere, older setups might still be using older connectors in which case, it can be used but you're not getting full 4k. I think the point is that it has the connections to plug into anything that might be there, even if it's as archaic as VGA. We're at least past the days of composite video. :p
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment