Thursday, May 31st 2018

ROCCAT Announces Its First In-House-Developed Switch, the Titan

ROCCAT presents the Titan Switch Tactile, the first mechanical switch designed in-house in cooperation with TTC, a leading manufacturer in its field. The Titan Switch Tactile is the perfect synthesis of competitive speed, first-class typing feel and striking aesthetics.

ROCCAT's challenge was to make a more responsive and swift switch. The first step was to reduce the actuation point from 2 to 1.8 mm, keeping in focus the quality feel of the key stroke. In addition, the switch bouncing time was reduced by 20%, this was achieved by optimizing the ROCCAT firmware working in conjunction with high-quality components, therefore securing the stability of the switch.
The crisp, tactile pressure point paired with solid precision and high reaction speed ensures an excellent typing feel. To top it all off, design also played a decisive role in the development of the Titan Switch Tactile, a world premiere in this area. The transparent housing in combination with reduced, ultra-light key caps not only allow insights into the mechanics of the switch, but also becomes the perfect companion for the ROCCAT AIMO lighting system.
Each switch contains a long-life multicolor LED for impressive lighting scenarios in a range of 16.8 million colors. The result is a powerfully balanced switch - precise, responsive, and comfortable.

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12 Comments on ROCCAT Announces Its First In-House-Developed Switch, the Titan

#1
Vayra86
So... soon we'll have a Titan R, Titan B, etc. for the switch colors?

Honestly do not understand why a switch would be 'Titan'. Maybe I'm weird
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#2
Sandbo
Vayra86, post: 3849080, member: 152404"
So... soon we'll have a Titan R, Titan B, etc. for the switch colors?

Honestly do not understand why a switch would be 'Titan'. Maybe I'm weird
Just as Logitech named theirs Romer-G, but at least they didn't color them.
Posted on Reply
#3
Octopuss
I am starting to suspect that all the stuff around keyboards smells of snake oil.
Just give me lower (not low though) profile Cherry switches already and I'll be happy.
Posted on Reply
#4
Vayra86
Octopuss, post: 3849088, member: 74316"
I am starting to suspect that all the stuff around keyboards smells of snake oil.
Just give me lower (not low though) profile Cherry switches already and I'll be happy.
Of course it is 90% snake oil. Mechanical switches are simply a matter of preference and variations on the theme (small deviations from the red/green/brown/black/etc. switches) only serve to create some buzz within this tiny niche, to get some attention. Some take it even further than the switch and make a huge deal about doubleshot caps and all that other stuff, all the way up to customizable boards. I think its a similar 'hobby' as audiophiles have, or hardware enthusiasts as a whole. We're chasing an (often imaginary) 'top 5%' in terms of performance and quality. And many fools and money are parted in the process. Anyone who thinks otherwise needs to get a reality check :)

And its all fine. We all have hobbies and they cost some money. But I think its healthy to get the above perspective thrown at you from time to time. (I notice the positive effect of that with myself, at least)
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#5
Octopuss
Don't even start about audiofascists and their $1000 silver cables :D
Posted on Reply
#6
atomicus
Vayra86, post: 3849093, member: 152404"
Of course it is 90% snake oil. Mechanical switches are simply a matter of preference and variations on the theme (small deviations from the red/green/brown/black/etc. switches) only serve to create some buzz within this tiny niche, to get some attention. Some take it even further than the switch and make a huge deal about doubleshot caps and all that other stuff, all the way up to customizable boards. I think its a similar 'hobby' as audiophiles have, or hardware enthusiasts as a whole. We're chasing an (often imaginary) 'top 5%' in terms of performance and quality. And many fools and money are parted in the process. Anyone who thinks otherwise needs to get a reality check :)

And its all fine. We all have hobbies and they cost some money. But I think its healthy to get the above perspective thrown at you from time to time. (I notice the positive effect of that with myself, at least)
I do see your point, but it depends where you're coming from. The cynical view is that it's all a big load of marketing BS, which is fair and there is that side to it... but it's not snake oil... there really is a significant and perceivable difference in feel across all manner of switches, even different types of lube on the same switch (yes, that's a thing). It's not like audio where some people just can't hear the difference no matter what. Humans are incredibly sensitive when it comes to touch and feel, and it's surprising how big a difference there can be across the myriad options out there. Besides, we are talking about a hugely significant and primary device that many of us spend the better part of a day using to interact with others, creating etc. I think more people probably should take an interest, at least more than they do. Typing on a keyboard you love the feel of is a pleasure.

But yes, it's very much a hobby (and an expensive one at that) and not something that most people really care very much about... but it's not nonsense, it's just a question as to whether someone is really bothered or not. You will find most people are really quite surprised once they start exploring this rabbit hole though... it goes a looooooong way down! ;)
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#7
Octopuss
atomicus, post: 3849375, member: 155807"
even different types of lube on the same switch
Stop right there.
Posted on Reply
#8
Vayra86
atomicus, post: 3849375, member: 155807"
I do see your point, but it depends where you're coming from. The cynical view is that it's all a big load of marketing BS, which is fair and there is that side to it... but it's not snake oil... there really is a significant and perceivable difference in feel across all manner of switches, even different types of lube on the same switch (yes, that's a thing). It's not like audio where some people just can't hear the difference no matter what. Humans are incredibly sensitive when it comes to touch and feel, and it's surprising how big a difference there can be across the myriad options out there. Besides, we are talking about a hugely significant and primary device that many of us spend the better part of a day using to interact with others, creating etc. I think more people probably should take an interest, at least more than they do. Typing on a keyboard you love the feel of is a pleasure.

But yes, it's very much a hobby (and an expensive one at that) and not something that most people really care very much about... but it's not nonsense, it's just a question as to whether someone is really bothered or not. You will find most people are really quite surprised once they start exploring this rabbit hole though... it goes a looooooong way down! ;)
This, to me, reads exactly the same as the audiophile promoting cables crafted by elves in moonlight. Literally every single argument you've made here can be interchanged with that. Sorry...

Its personal preference. And if you personally prefer to lube your switches... power to you. But realistically? Its a little bit odd and certainly miles away from necessity in any way shape or form. Similar to the type of switch and all that other jazz. Its a personal preference and we only prefer it because we can afford it. Not because it is needed in any way for any noticeable gain in productivity or ergonomics. Just comfort. Its abstract, not measurable.

Don't get me wrong, I have a mechanical keyboard myself, but I'm sane enough to know its just a preference, and that is all it is. My gaming even competitively hasn't improved coming from membrane switches, its not 'faster' in any perceivable way or even more reliable in terms of repeated, fast key presses; and my typing is in fact faster on a membrane or scissor switch...
Posted on Reply
#9
atomicus
Vayra86, post: 3849485, member: 152404"
This, to me, reads exactly the same as the audiophile promoting cables crafted by elves in moonlight. Literally every single argument you've made here can be interchanged with that. Sorry...

Its personal preference. And if you personally prefer to lube your switches... power to you. But realistically? Its a little bit odd and certainly miles away from necessity in any way shape or form. Similar to the type of switch and all that other jazz. Its a personal preference and we only prefer it because we can afford it. Not because it is needed in any way for any noticeable gain in productivity or ergonomics. Just comfort. Its abstract, not measurable.

Don't get me wrong, I have a mechanical keyboard myself, but I'm sane enough to know its just a preference, and that is all it is. My gaming even competitively hasn't improved coming from membrane switches, its not 'faster' in any perceivable way or even more reliable in terms of repeated, fast key presses; and my typing is in fact faster on a membrane or scissor switch...
I think what I said has either not been read or just completely misunderstood. Of course it's a 'preference'... that goes without saying. Nor is it a 'necessity' (I never said that). But it's not the same as an audiophile argument for exactly the reason I described. It's been proven how delicate our sense of touch is. We can sense things with the tip of our finger at inconceivably low/small measurements (which have been measured). Hearing is (obviously) a different sense altogether and FAR more variable person to person, not comparable in the same way. Besides, audiophiles do talk utter nonsense sometimes, claiming to hear frequencies that are completely beyond the human range of hearing. Touch is a different thing altogether, that's my point, and pretty much everyone will be able to feel the difference between switches in a blind test... that's all I was saying. Preference, choice etc. is a different thing.

There's two things going on here... on one side we have the industry and keyboard manufacturers pushing various switches etc. There's going to be all sorts of inflated claims around as to why their switch is better etc. and yes, that's mostly marketing fluff which should be largely ignored. On the other hand, the myriad options available do NOT all feel the same, not at all. Yes that's predominantly a comfort issue, but for someone who is behind a keyboard most of the day, that's a HUGE factor in their decision making. The only way you can know what's right for you is to experiment. It would be far more than a 5% difference if you're typing on a keyboard that gives you finger pain (as I have experienced with some switches) vs one that you can type on all day with none!
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#10
Disparia
Vayra86, post: 3849080, member: 152404"
Honestly do not understand why a switch would be 'Titan'. Maybe I'm weird
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
atomicus, post: 3858672, member: 155807"
I think what I said has either not been read or just completely misunderstood. Of course it's a 'preference'... that goes without saying. Nor is it a 'necessity' (I never said that). But it's not the same as an audiophile argument for exactly the reason I described. It's been proven how delicate our sense of touch is. We can sense things with the tip of our finger at inconceivably low/small measurements (which have been measured). Hearing is (obviously) a different sense altogether and FAR more variable person to person, not comparable in the same way. Besides, audiophiles do talk utter nonsense sometimes, claiming to hear frequencies that are completely beyond the human range of hearing. Touch is a different thing altogether, that's my point, and pretty much everyone will be able to feel the difference between switches in a blind test... that's all I was saying. Preference, choice etc. is a different thing.

There's two things going on here... on one side we have the industry and keyboard manufacturers pushing various switches etc. There's going to be all sorts of inflated claims around as to why their switch is better etc. and yes, that's mostly marketing fluff which should be largely ignored. On the other hand, the myriad options available do NOT all feel the same, not at all. Yes that's predominantly a comfort issue, but for someone who is behind a keyboard most of the day, that's a HUGE factor in their decision making. The only way you can know what's right for you is to experiment. It would be far more than a 5% difference if you're typing on a keyboard that gives you finger pain (as I have experienced with some switches) vs one that you can type on all day with none!
You have to understand that 90% of all those decisions are based on entirely different factors than the actual keystroke. Premium 'feel', status, budget, etc. play a primary role. Its not about the key. Its about having something special. The preference comes later, you 'develop it'. Its all psychology. If all you ever used was a membrane, that is what you prefer until you 'decide' something else is better. Its abstract just like those audio cables. There is no concrete, measurable advantage to (most if not all) key types, except perhaps when you speak of ghosting, N-key rollover and polling rates.
Posted on Reply
#12
atomicus
Vayra86, post: 3858723, member: 152404"
You have to understand that 90% of all those decisions are based on entirely different factors than the actual keystroke. Premium 'feel', status, budget, etc. play a primary role. Its not about the key. Its about having something special. The preference comes later, you 'develop it'. Its all psychology. If all you ever used was a membrane, that is what you prefer until you 'decide' something else is better. Its abstract just like those audio cables. There is no concrete, measurable advantage to (most if not all) key types, except perhaps when you speak of ghosting, N-key rollover and polling rates.
The problem is that marketing, advertising and the entire industry mechanism that tries to sell us these things muddies the waters. Yes, the decision to purchase a certain keyboard is, for most people, influenced by those factors. They've been lead to believe they 'need' something that they really don't, or that they will obtain an 'edge' by using it. This is the way the world works unfortunately; it's mass consumerism in a nutshell and applies to pretty much every marketplace. And yes, THIS aspect is certainly psychological.

But as you go down the keyboard switch rabbit hole, this is NOT the case. There is simply no comparison to audio cables. I would put money on the ability to fool plenty of 'experts' with a cheap off the shelf cable posing as a top end one. You can't do that with a keyboard switch. There is no getting away from the difference in actuation force, the feel of the stem (with and without lube) and the weight of the spring, even keycap shape and material plays a role. My 92-year old grandma could tell the difference. It doesn't matter if she has any interest or need for a mechanical keyboard switch in her life... that wasn't my original point. I was merely stating that there IS a perceivable and sometimes very obvious difference between all manner of keyboard switches. This aspect isn't psychological, it's the human sense of TOUCH, which as stated, has been proven to be incredibly sensitive. So much so in fact, that scientists have shown our touch is sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules.

As to there being no advantage... well, to whom and in what context? For the average person who sends few emails and browses Amazon daily then no, obviously not. To a pro-gamer where every millisecond counts, then very much yes, there would be a significant advantage using fast actuation switches over slow. And my example of using a heavy switch vs a light one for someone who does a lot of typing every day is another situation where that light switch would quite clearly offer a greater advantage. You can't 'measure' this in a traditional sense (I don't know what you mean by that term exactly here), but the advantages are very obvious in specific situations. The bottom line is that if you spend A LOT of time behind a keyboard, switch choice becomes a very significant factor in what you're doing, for better or worse.

You are correct that people develop a preference, but this is true of everything in life. You can't know what you prefer until you've spent time doing it and experienced the various options available to you. Of course, some people just don't care and never will, but that's fine. It doesn't mean the entire mech switch industry is snake-oil, it just means you have to navigate the often inflated and sometimes bogus claims of manufacturers to find what works best for you.
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