Friday, July 13th 2018

Gartner Says Worldwide PC Shipments Grew For the First Time in Six Years

Worldwide PC shipments totaled 62.1 million units in the second quarter of 2018, a 1.4 percent increase from the second quarter of 2017, according to preliminary results by Gartner, Inc. This is the first quarter of year-over-year global PC shipment growth since the first quarter of 2012.

All regions experienced some growth compared with a year ago. While the results are a positive result for the PC industry, Gartner analysts said this sign of market stability is not enough to declare a PC industry recovery just yet.

"PC shipment growth in the second quarter of 2018 was driven by demand in the business market, which was offset by declining shipments in the consumer segment," said Mikako Kitagawa, principal analyst at Gartner. "In the consumer space, the fundamental market structure, due to changes on PC user behavior, still remains, and continues to impact market growth. Consumers are using their smartphones for even more daily tasks, such as checking social media, calendaring, banking and shopping, which is reducing the need for a consumer PC.

"In the business segment, PC momentum will weaken in two years when the replacement peak for Windows 10 passes. PC vendors should look for ways to maintain growth in the business market as the Windows 10 upgrade cycle tails off."

With the completion of Lenovo's joint venture with Fujitsu, three out of four PCs were shipped by the top five PC vendors in the second quarter of 2018. With the inclusion of Fujitsu's PC shipments due to the joint venture (a formation of Joint Venture with Fujitsu), Lenovo was in a virtual tie with HP Inc. for the top spot in the second quarter of 2018 based on global PC shipments (see Table 1). All of the top five PC vendors experienced an increase in worldwide PC shipments in the quarter.
Notes: Data includes desk-based PCs, notebook PCs and ultramobile premiums (such as Microsoft Surface), but not Chromebooks or iPads. All data is estimated based on a preliminary study. Final estimates will be subject to change. The statistics are based on shipments selling into channels. Numbers may not add up to totals shown due to rounding.
Lenovo's results include Fujitsu's units starting in 2Q18 to reflect the joint venture that closed in May 2018.
Source: Gartner (July 2018)

HP Inc. had its third consecutive quarter of year-over-year PC shipment growth. HP Inc. maintained steady growth across all regions, except the U.S. In the other regions, its shipment growth well exceeded the regional averages. Lenovo experienced its highest growth rate since the first quarter of 2015.

While Dell's competitors have shown PC shipment declines periodically in the past two years, Dell's shipments did not decline during this time because of its strong focus on growth areas, especially in the commercial segment, as well as cutting off unprofitable businesses.

In the U.S. PC market, the industry returned to growth after six consecutive quarters of shipment declines. In the second quarter of 2018, U.S. PC shipments totaled 14.5 million units, a 1.7 percent increase from the same period last year (see Table 2). HP Inc. continued to be the market leader in the U.S., but Dell closed the gap, as Dell's U.S. PC shipments increased 7.2 percent.

"In the U.S., business PC demand was particularly strong among the public sector as the second quarter is typically PC buying season among government and education buyers," Ms. Kitagawa said. "Desk-based PC growth was attributed to continued high usage of desk-based PCs in the U.S. public sectors. Mobile PCs grew in the U.S., but strong Chromebook demand in the education market adversely affected PC growth. Overall, Chromebooks grew 8 percent in the U.S., but Chromebooks are not included in the PC market statistics."
Notes: Data includes desk-based PCs, notebook PCs and ultramobile premiums (such as Microsoft Surface), but not Chromebooks or iPads. All data is estimated based on a preliminary study. Final estimates will be subject to change. The statistics are based on shipments selling into channels. Numbers may not add up to totals shown due to rounding.
Lenovo's results include Fujitsu's units starting in 2Q18 to reflect the joint venture that closed in May 2018.
Source: Gartner (July 2018)

PC shipments in EMEA reached 17.4 million units in the second quarter of 2018, a 1.3 percent increase year over year. In Western Europe, demand was strong for business PCs in Germany and the U.K. Eurasia, which includes Russia, remained the growth region in EMEA. While the second quarter is usually a slower quarter in terms of PC demand, several countries, such as Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, continued to see increasing consumer demand.

PC shipments in Asia/Pacific totaled 21.3 million units, a 0.1 percent increase from the second quarter of 2017. India, Indonesia, Thailand and other emerging markets in Asia showed improvement in the commercial segment due to demand for replacing aging PCs and upgrading to Windows 10. In China, PC shipments declined 3.6 percent year over year as some business procurements have been postponed to 2019, and the consumer market is saturated.

These results are preliminary. Final statistics will be available soon to clients of Gartner's PC Quarterly Statistics Worldwide by Region program. This program offers a comprehensive and timely picture of the worldwide PC market, allowing product planning, distribution, marketing and sales organizations to keep abreast of key issues and their future implications around the globe.
Add your own comment

22 Comments on Gartner Says Worldwide PC Shipments Grew For the First Time in Six Years

#1
Xaled
"PC shipment growth in the second quarter of 2018 was driven by demand in the business market
Which was driven by realease of Ryzen and Threadripper i guess.. competitiveness is always a good thing
Posted on Reply
#2
Tsukiyomi91
thank AMD for that Gartner... if it wasn't for their comeback & shaking up Intel's trees, there won't be any growth in global PC shipments or sales. To sweeten the deal, AMD even slashed prices on all their CPU lineup on top of an already affordable mobos for the masses to build their own PC or buying a complete pre-built one.
Posted on Reply
#3
Gungar
Pre-build shipments that's far from being any indicator about PC health.
Posted on Reply
#4
dj-electric
Gungar said:
Pre-build shipments that's far from being any indicator about PC health.
Amen to that. I always laughed at those prebuilt statistics.
Posted on Reply
#5
windwhirl
Gungar said:
Pre-build shipments that's far from being any indicator about PC health.
Yeah, considering that many PC shops build their own rigs and sell them to the public. Honestly, the only valid information would be laptop shipments.
Posted on Reply
#6
trog100
windwhirl said:
Yeah, considering that many PC shops build their own rigs and sell them to the public. Honestly, the only valid information would be laptop shipments.
smart phones damage both camera sales and PC sales.. people are trading convenience for quality.. no way could could i swap a PC or a camera for smart phone "convenience" but it seems a lot people can..

i am currently sat in a recliner looking at a 27 inch monitor and typing on a real keyboard.. sadly none of it fits in my pocket though.. he he

trog
Posted on Reply
#7
Gungar
trog100 said:
smart phones damage both camera sales and PC sales.. people are trading convenience for quality.. no way could could i swap a PC or a camera for smart phone "convenience" but it seems a lot people can..

i am currently sat in a recliner looking at a 27 inch monitor and typing on a real keyboard.. sadly none of it fits in my pocket though.. he he

trog
Sadly, most people prefer convenience over quality.
Posted on Reply
#8
Manu_PT
Xaled said:
Which was driven by realease of Ryzen and Threadripper i guess.. competitiveness is always a good thing
*wich was driven by the fact that pre builts with mining gpus were way cheaper than the gpu prices, so miners started buying loads of pre builts.

True.

Ryzen is irrelevant to these stats. Look at steamstats and tell me how many use Ryzen.
Posted on Reply
#9
Xaled
Manu_PT said:
*wich was driven by the fact that pre builts with mining gpus were way cheaper than the gpu prices, so miners started buying loads of pre builts.

True.

Ryzen is irrelevant to these stats. Look at steamstats and tell me how many use Ryzen.
Read the 2nd comment please.

i never said that sales increased just because people bought Ryzen cpus but release of Ryzen and Threadripper forced Intel to make huge price reductions or people got much more horsepower for same money, for example 6 cores-12threads became mainstream . In fact, thanks to Ryzen, Intel too sold more cpus.

Just check Amazons bestselling cpu stats
Posted on Reply
#10
Manu_PT
Xaled said:
Read the 2nd comment please.

i never said that sales increased just because people bought Ryzen cpus but release of Ryzen and Threadripper forced Intel to make huge price reductions or people got much more horsepower for same money, for example 6 cores-12threads became mainstream . In fact, thanks to Ryzen, Intel too sold more cpus.

Just check Amazons bestselling cpu stats
I think you still didnt get that part about this being pre builts stats. This has nothing to do with intel or amd. Oh and amazon best selling cpu is i7 8700k followed by i5 8400 as I just checked and 7% of steam users are with Ryzen according to steamstats so Im not sure what your point is tbh.
Posted on Reply
#11
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Manu_PT said:
I think you still didnt get that part about this being pre builts stats. This has nothing to do with intel or amd. Oh and amazon best selling cpu is i7 8700k followed by i5 8400 as I just checked and 7% of steam users are with Ryzen according to steamstats so Im not sure what your point is tbh.
Sales have increased? Thanks, RGB! That’s actually what is most likely behind the increase, unfortunately for some.
Posted on Reply
#12
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
Manu_PT said:

Ryzen is irrelevant to these stats. Look at steamstats and tell me how many use Ryzen.
Steam is irrelevant to make any claims about whether Ryzen was or wasn’t a factor. Steam users are a minority of the pc world.
Posted on Reply
#13
Bansaku
The way I see it, there are quite a bit of older system's PSU failing. Nothing conspiratorial, just experience with PSUs failing 1 year after their 5 year warranty expires. Think about it.
Posted on Reply
#14
yotano211
trog100 said:
smart phones damage both camera sales and PC sales.. people are trading convenience for quality.. no way could could i swap a PC or a camera for smart phone "convenience" but it seems a lot people can..

i am currently sat in a recliner looking at a 27 inch monitor and typing on a real keyboard.. sadly none of it fits in my pocket though.. he he

trog
Some smartphone cameras is not that bad for simple shots but think of carrying around 6+lb of camera equipment. When ever I go to an airshow, I carry a Nikon d750 and 3 lens for about 8lb of equipment and batteries. I'm not paid for it or work for some photography studio, I like taking pictures of airplanes.
Posted on Reply
#15
Vayra86
There are several things attributable but I think the most significant one is that we are entering a time (+5~7 years) where people start replacing their Sandy and Ivy bridge systems. Those are running into hardware problem era right about now and have been great sellers in the past. So that's a 'wave' kind of thing that comes on top of the current healthy landscape of competition and increased core counts.

Rather than 'thanks AMD' I would say 'Thanks, time and simple wear & tear'
Posted on Reply
#16
trog100
yotano211 said:
Some smartphone cameras is not that bad for simple shots but think of carrying around 6+lb of camera equipment. When ever I go to an airshow, I carry a Nikon d750 and 3 lens for about 8lb of equipment and batteries. I'm not paid for it or work for some photography studio, I like taking pictures of airplanes.
i kind of compromise.. i bought a ton of panasonic M4/3 gear to keep the weight down but ever since i bought a panasonic FZ1000 all in one camera i have never used it.. the FX1000 is just better than it should be.. not exactly small but smaller than a suitcase full of lenses..

trog
Posted on Reply
#17
yotano211
trog100 said:
i kind of compromise.. i bought a ton of panasonic M4/3 gear to keep the weight down but ever since i bought a panasonic FZ1000 all in one camera i have never used it.. the FX1000 is just better than it should be.. not exactly small but smaller than a suitcase full of lenses..

trog
Those seem to be small camera, the nikon d750 is a full frame camera.
Posted on Reply
#18
trog100
yotano211 said:
Those seem to be small camera, the nikon d750 is a full frame camera.
true but not as small as a phone camera.. size is a relative thing.. the snag is the bigger the sensor the bigger the glass.. the fZ1000 has a one inch sensor i would call it an outdoor camera.. in reasonable light it does a remarkable job for the size of its sensor.. its all a compromise between one thing or another..

my drone (which is really a flying camera) also uses a one inch sensor.. not much good for taking pictures of airplanes though it wont let you take off within five miles of an airport.. he he..

i am gonna get told off for going off topic.. :)

trog
Posted on Reply
#19
close
It's also likely that this coincided with the refresh cycles in many businesses. They are longer and longer lately, since for smaller businesses a PC is able to do the job for longer than the usual 4 years. So 6 years might be exactly how long it took them to upgrade from the previous cycle, boosted of course by AMDs recent performance that pulled the prices down.
Posted on Reply
#20
yotano211
trog100 said:
true but not as small as a phone camera.. size is a relative thing.. the snag is the bigger the sensor the bigger the glass.. the fZ1000 has a one inch sensor i would call it an outdoor camera.. in reasonable light it does a remarkable job for the size of its sensor.. its all a compromise between one thing or another..

my drone (which is really a flying camera) also uses a one inch sensor.. not much good for taking pictures of airplanes though it wont let you take off within five miles of an airport.. he he..

i am gonna get told off for going off topic.. :)

trog
I want to get a drone. I want to use it around the ocean when I learn to sail.
Posted on Reply
#21
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
close said:
It's also likely that this coincided with the refresh cycles in many businesses. They are longer and longer lately, since for smaller businesses a PC is able to do the job for longer than the usual 4 years. So 6 years might be exactly how long it took them to upgrade from the previous cycle, boosted of course by AMDs recent performance that pulled the prices down.
You also might have a factor there as well. We just upgraded hundreds of computers that were 10 years old.
Posted on Reply
#22
trog100
rtwjunkie said:
You also might have a factor there as well. We just upgraded hundreds of computers that were 10 years old.
the thing is the average business PC dosnt need that much compute power and there really isnt much need to upgrade it.. six to ten years seems about right and then most of them hit the ebay refurb market.. there is also a trend for ex office machines to get fitted with a 1050tI gpu and new case and get sold as gaming machines..

the sales blurb makes me smile.. brand new except for motherboard cpu and memory.. he he

trog
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment