Tuesday, October 15th 2019

InWin Announces Unique, Ultra-Light PC Chassis with Colorful Covers

InWin is excited to announce its new "Alice" PC Chassis. Gathering inspiration from the classic story, Alice in Wonderland, InWin is taking PC builders on a journey where imagination reigns supreme!

The Alice chassis combines a durable and sturdy, yet ultra-light-weight frame with a variety of vivid colors. For those that are bold enough to enjoy something different than a traditional, heavy case, the Alice chassis showcases an explosion of possible color choices and intricate designs to create something totally distinct.
Inside, the Alice chassis is designed to allow the easiest PC hardware installation ever. It features a removable steel motherboard tray so the main components can be carefully installed outside, if required, then the open frame design allows cable routing to become an easier and neater practice. Once the PC is assembled, its vertical internal design provides considerably better cooling through an unobstructed path that follows natural convection, while this bottom-to-top airflow can be driven by three base-mounted fans.
With the vertical mounting of internal hardware, the motherboard I/O ports are at the top for easy-access. Since dust makes builders "mad as a hatter," the cover hides internal cables and limits dust entry.
Integrated into its design are four vibration-proof mounts placed on the feet to provide a stable base that resists bumps. Two integrated handles mean the chassis can be lifted and moved easily, while its ultra-light-weight materials and taller design allows for easier transportation, even when full of hardware.
The Alice chassis can support up to ATX motherboards with eight expansion slots, and high-performance hardware such as longer graphics cards, power supplies and taller CPU coolers. UP to four 120 mm fans can be fitted, plus three 2.5-inch SSDs and one 3.5-inch HDD.

For more information about the InWin Alice Chassis, please visit: https://www.in-win.com/en/gaming-chassis/alice/
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37 Comments on InWin Announces Unique, Ultra-Light PC Chassis with Colorful Covers

#26
Totally
lZKoce
And yet instead of getting PC cases primarily from metal/wood/glass/paper?, which can be recycled or re-purposed we get 99,9% plastic PC enclosure launch....hard pass for me.
Plastic can't be recycled? That's news to me. I've been doing it all wrong then and should just chuck plastics in the trash instead of the recycle bin marked plastic. /s The push to move away from plastics is because it bio degrades, slowly if at all, ending up in places it isn't supposed, and in ways it isn't meant to be because of the way it breaks down, when it does break down. To imply plastic cannot be recycled that's just...
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#27
Valantar
Totally
Plastic can't be recycled? That's news to me. I've been doing it all wrong then and should just chuck plastics in the trash instead of the recycle bin marked plastic. /s The push to move away from plastics is because it bio degrades, slowly if at all, ending up in places it isn't supposed, and in ways it isn't meant to be because of the way it breaks down, when it does break down. To imply plastic cannot be recycled that's just...
Actually, a lot of plastics are either non-recyclable or are but are not actually recycled as nobody is providing that service. As a general rule, soft plastics are recycled to a decent degree (30-50% in some countries), while hard plastics are usually not recycled at all.
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#28
Totally
Valantar
Actually, a lot of plastics are either non-recyclable or are but are not actually recycled as nobody is providing that service. As a general rule, soft plastics are recycled to a decent degree (30-50% in some countries), while hard plastics are usually not recycled at all.
That's still a far way from saying metal/glass/wood/paper can be recycled unlike plastic
Posted on Reply
#29
ZoneDymo
As long as its cheap, I actually quite like it myself
Posted on Reply
#30
lZKoce
Totally
Plastic can't be recycled? That's news to me. I've been doing it all wrong then and should just chuck plastics in the trash instead of the recycle bin marked plastic. /s The push to move away from plastics is because it bio degrades, slowly if at all, ending up in places it isn't supposed, and in ways it isn't meant to be because of the way it breaks down, when it does break down. To imply plastic cannot be recycled that's just...
I am not saying plastics can't be recycled, it's more likely me composing my post badly, which I apologize for. It is, but as you and @Valantar discussed it is often ending up in places where it's not supposed to be.
Posted on Reply
#31
Valantar
Totally
That's still a far way from saying metal/glass/wood/paper can be recycled unlike plastic
Somewhat true, but recycling infrastructure is far better developed in most places for glass and metals, while wood and paper are biodegradable, paper is recyclable, and scrap wood can be further processed into useful products. As such, plastics fall pretty far down the list of recyclability.
Posted on Reply
#32
Totally
lZKoce
I am not saying plastics can't be recycled, it's more likely me composing my post badly, which I apologize for. It is, but as you and @Valantar discussed it is often ending up in places where it's not supposed to be.
Reread what you wrote. There were no lines to read between, simply put you wrote these can be recycled, and this cannot
Posted on Reply
#33
lZKoce
Totally
Reread what you wrote. There were no lines to read between, simply put you wrote these can be recycled, and this cannot
I read what I wrote and sounds good to me. May be a little harsh on this product launch, but making a point valid to me. I don't know how we got the point I imply that plastics can't be recycled, but yeah if you say so, I do imply plastics can't recycled and "that's just...".
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#34
Totally
lZKoce
I read what I wrote and sounds good to me. May be a little harsh on this product launch, but making a point valid to me. I don't know how we got the point I imply that plastics can't be recycled, but yeah if you say so, I do imply plastics can't recycled and "that's just...".
Here "instead of getting PC cases primarily from metal/wood/glass/paper, which can be recycled or re-purposed, we get 99,9% plastic PC enclosure.

You have an appositive phrase declaring the indirect subjects in the dependent clause, metal/wood/glass/paper, are recyclable unlike the direct subject of the independent clause, plastic.

Rearranging the clauses so they're not backwards.

"We get 99.9% plastic enclosure instead of getting PC cases primarily from metal/wood/glass/paper which can be recycled or repurposed."

Is it not implied that plastic cannot be recycled or repurposed?
Posted on Reply
#35
lZKoce
Totally
Here "instead of getting PC cases primarily from metal/wood/glass/paper, which can be recycled or re-purposed, we get 99,9% plastic PC enclosure.

You have an appositive phrase declaring the indirect subjects in the dependent clause, metal/wood/glass/paper, are recyclable unlike the direct subject of the independent clause, plastic.

Rearranging the clauses so they're not backwards.

"We get 99.9% plastic enclosure instead of getting PC cases primarily from metal/wood/glass/paper which can be recycled or repurposed."

Is it no implied that plastic cannot be recycled or repurposed?

Thanks man, that was actually useful. I thought you were just nit-picking or something. I hope I didn't offend you. I am sorry everyone for the off-topic.
Posted on Reply
#36
Redwoodz
Let's not worry too much about InWin selling a few thousand plastic pc cases that will last for years.

The design is excellent. You have to look at it as a customizable frame....that's the beauty.
Posted on Reply
#37
ypsylon
Valantar
Somewhat true, but recycling infrastructure is far better developed in most places for glass and metals, while wood and paper are biodegradable, paper is recyclable, and scrap wood can be further processed into useful products. As such, plastics fall pretty far down the list of recyclability.
Partially right. I agree that tons of hard plastics are problematic at best to recycle in any way. Especially black plastics.

Clean paper (like e.g. simple newspaper/printer paper with weight of 40-80g/m2) yeah sure. But you can't recycle paper fused with polymers, aluminium (ubiquitous Tetra-pack style solutions - e.g. tubes from Pringles chips or any UHT milk) and many, many other. You can recycle to some degree heavy duty cardboard, but recycling them is much more toxic than recycling for example HDPE, which is simply trivial. By default recycling any paper resistant to water (fused with polymers or tons of cellulose) is neither economical nor environmentally viable. You'll produce less waste by burning them than recycling.

Biodegradability of paper fused with plastics/metals (like 75% of paper used today) is highly questionable at best.
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