Monday, October 21st 2019

Kingston Digital Introduces New KC600 SATA SSD

Kingston Digital Europe Co LLP, the flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., a world leader in memory products and technology solutions, today announced it is shipping the KC600 SATA SSD. Designed for use in desktop and notebook workloads, KC600 is a full-capacity SSD that provides remarkable performance. It comes in a 2.5" form factor using the SATA Rev 3.0 interface with backwards compatibility.

KC600 is optimized for functional system responsiveness with incredible boot, loading and transfer times. It supports a full-security suite that includes AES-XTS 256-bit hardware-based encryption, TCG Opal 2.0 and eDrive, allowing users to protect and secure their data. KC600 will be available in capacities up to 2 TB utilizing the latest 3D TLC NAND technology and has read/write speeds up to 550/520 MB/s, respectively. It is offered as both a stand-alone SSD or as a bundle kit which provides everything needed for an easy desktop or notebook upgrade installation.
KC600 is currently available in 256 GB and 512 GB capacities, with 1 TB and 2 TB shipping soon. KC600 is backed by a limited five-year warranty, free technical support and legendary Kingston reliability.
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17 Comments on Kingston Digital Introduces New KC600 SATA SSD

#1
TheLostSwede
And here I am waiting for a half capacity SSD...
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#2
Assimilator
I wonder what controller/NAND this is using. If it's priced the same as their A400 they might have another winner on their hands.
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#3
Valantar
Is that a blister-packed SSD? I guess we now have incontrovertible proof that SATA SSDs are nothing but commodity products now. Oh, how the times have changed.
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#4
Sihastru
Assimilator
I wonder what controller/NAND this is using. If it's priced the same as their A400 they might have another winner on their hands.
SMI SM2259 controller with XTS-AES 256-bit encryption
3D TLC NAND
KC600 256GB - $44.20
KC600 512GB - $72.80
Posted on Reply
#5
dj-electric
Valantar
Is that a blister-packed SSD? I guess we now have incontrovertible proof that SATA SSDs are nothing but commodity products now. Oh, how the times have changed.
This type of packaging literally existed for a decade now on SSDs, what are you on about?
Posted on Reply
#6
QUANTUMPHYSICS
Perhaps in a year or two the 4TB SSD will drop below $200 and I can upgrade.

I just bought another SSD, Crucial 2TB, for my system.

I eventually wannabe able to get all my data onto just one, rather than several 1TB or 2TB.
Posted on Reply
#7
Valantar
dj-electric
This type of packaging literally existed for a decade now on SSDs, what are you on about?
Maybe I've bought the wrong SSDs then, but I've never seen one that hasn't come in a small cardboard box (like picture 2). These (pictures 3-6) are packaged like SD cards.
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#8
EzioAs
Valantar
Maybe I've bought the wrong SSDs then, but I've never seen one that hasn't come in a small cardboard box (like picture 2). These (pictures 3-6) are packaged like SD cards.
Well, now you know it's nothing new.
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#9
Valantar
EzioAs
Well, now you know it's nothing new.
Makes me wonder which brands have been doing this - care to elaborate? The only SSDs I've bought in recent years have been Samsung or Crucial, but I also had an Intel and a Corsair drive back in the day. Oh, and I also bought a couple of cheapo Aliexpress drives before prices plummeted. All of which came in similar cardboard boxes.
Posted on Reply
#10
kapone32
QUANTUMPHYSICS
Perhaps in a year or two the 4TB SSD will drop below $200 and I can upgrade.

I just bought another SSD, Crucial 2TB, for my system.

I eventually wannabe able to get all my data onto just one, rather than several 1TB or 2TB.
I really wish that was the case. It would seem that SSD pricing is wonky. I was looking at Newegg today and they have the Crucial MP 500 1TB for $144.99 Canadian on sale but the regular price is $188.99 and then the 2TB is on sale for $305 with a regular price of $388.99. The kicker though is 4TB drives are even more expensive $764 is the cheapest I saw for a Samsung 860 EVO and $1516 for an Intel based 4TB. My thought process is that the cheapest drive you will be able to buy in those capacities at decent prices will be the successor for the Intel 660P or other QLC based NVME drives.

Valantar
Makes me wonder which brands have been doing this - care to elaborate? The only SSDs I've bought in recent years have been Samsung or Crucial, but I also had an Intel and a Corsair drive back in the day. Oh, and I also bought a couple of cheapo Aliexpress drives before prices plummeted. All of which came in similar cardboard boxes.
If I remember correctly first gen SSDs from KIngston and OCZ came like this.
Posted on Reply
#11
Nater
Sihastru
SMI SM2259 controller with XTS-AES 256-bit encryption
3D TLC NAND
KC600 256GB - $44.20
KC600 512GB - $72.80
I'm surprised the market isn't drying up for that capacity for a SATA SSD. I mean..it's like going out and buying 1GB and 2GB sticks of ram. Who does that?

Anything under 1TB for me would be an OS drive, and is going to be NVME M.2... They're only good for upgrading that OLD PC to give to grandma. What about you guys?
Posted on Reply
#12
kapone32
Nater
I'm surprised the market isn't drying up for that capacity for a SATA SSD. I mean..it's like going out and buying 1GB and 2GB sticks of ram. Who does that?

Anything under 1TB for me would be an OS drive, and is going to be NVME M.2... They're only good for upgrading that OLD PC to give to grandma. What about you guys?
Well they sell them so somebody must be buying them.This site seems to be mostly populated by enthusiasts that would agree with that sentiment but there is no issue using a 256GB+ SSD for boot.
Posted on Reply
#13
EzioAs
Nater
I'm surprised the market isn't drying up for that capacity for a SATA SSD. I mean..it's like going out and buying 1GB and 2GB sticks of ram. Who does that?

Anything under 1TB for me would be an OS drive, and is going to be NVME M.2... They're only good for upgrading that OLD PC to give to grandma. What about you guys?
It'll be years before I go NVME. SATA is good enough for me for now.
Posted on Reply
#14
Assimilator
Nater
I'm surprised the market isn't drying up for that capacity for a SATA SSD. I mean..it's like going out and buying 1GB and 2GB sticks of ram. Who does that?

Anything under 1TB for me would be an OS drive, and is going to be NVME M.2... They're only good for upgrading that OLD PC to give to grandma. What about you guys?
Just be thankful that 128GB has mostly disappeared.
Posted on Reply
#15
Nater
Assimilator
Just be thankful that 128GB has mostly disappeared.
My OS/Main apps install is at 177GB. Throw in my games and we're adding another 810GB. My next drive is without a doubt a minimum 2TB NVMe M.2 SSD.
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#16
Prima.Vera
I have a 60GB Samsung 830 SSD home for my OS drive and it only has something like 60% fill rate. Never understood why do people need to install everything on the main drive (C drive) anyways? I like to keep my OS files separated physically from any other drive in case of failure. Don't want to loose both my OS and my programs/games/music/movies/pictures/utils, etc.
Posted on Reply
#17
Nater
Prima.Vera
I have a 60GB Samsung 830 SSD home for my OS drive and it only has something like 60% fill rate. Never understood why do people need to install everything on the main drive (C drive) anyways? I like to keep my OS files separated physically from any other drive in case of failure. Don't want to loose both my OS and my programs/games/music/movies/pictures/utils, etc.
It's all backed up anyways. I can't imagine the mess it would create if it did fail and saved the OS drive...I'd be reformatting anyways, what good is it if all the programs are fubared?
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