Friday, February 14th 2020

ModMyMods Launches ModWater PC Watercooling Coolants Produced in the USA

ModMyMods rose out of the proverbial ashes from the meltdown of FrozenCPU, a PC hardware boutique in upstate New York that catered primarily to custom watercooling. While FrozenCPU is back up and running in some form today, people in the northern states and along the east coast of the US have become accustomed to having a local resource for PC modding and cooling supplies with the Rochester-based ModMyMods. We met representatives from the company at CES this year where they showed off their upcoming line of coolants for DIY custom loops, aptly named ModWater. They anticipated a launch in March at the time, but have managed to churn out enough in the month since to release these for sale as of the time of this news post.

The company tells us that ModWater is the result of over an year of work that began with the making of ultra-pure water from an in-house designed purification system with a series of processing to bring down the final TDS (total dissolved solids) value to <0.05 ppm. They are separately selling this water in 5 US gallon tanks for system integrators, but the retail customer will not doubt be interested in the coolants themselves that come in Pure-Clear, and several UV-Reactive colors including: Red-UV, Green-UV, Blue-UV, and Clear-UV (Blue base UV). The coolants ship in 1 liter containers for $9 each in bottles that are shaped similar to motor oil bottles, with a spout design to help pour the coolant out. The coolants, as expected these days, has additives for anti-corrosion properties with biocide and fungicide activity as well. If you are interested, here's the collective link for the product pages.
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27 Comments on ModMyMods Launches ModWater PC Watercooling Coolants Produced in the USA

#1
TechLurker
Seems like they finally decided to copy DazMode in marketing their own Ultra-pure distilled water. Both are certainly cheaper than buying similar from laboratory/scientific-focused sites that sell a half-liter of ultra-pure distilled water for around 30+ USD.
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#2
Totally
You could make your own for a lot cheaper.
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#3
DeathtoGnomes
Totally
You could make your own for a lot cheaper.
oh? do tell. I'm skeptical about that, but that depends on how you would go about doing the filtering, just boiling water and draining thru a coffee filter or two alone will not do it.
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#4
Mamya3084
Use car coolant. 2 years and no issues here. Just don't use crappy PETG.
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#5
Dave65
Does it come in Synthetic?
i only put synthetic in mine :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
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#6
zo0lykas
Mamya3084
Use car coolant. 2 years and no issues here. Just don't use crappy PETG.
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#7
Totally
DeathtoGnomes
oh? do tell. I'm skeptical about that, but that depends on how you would go about doing the filtering, just boiling water and draining thru a coffee filter or two alone will not do it.
There isn't any distilling going on in what you described.

See below: Just add water. Be sure to throw out first 1/5 of distillate or filter the water beforehand or both. Still be much cheaper than $30/gal.
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#8
bonehead123
DeathtoGnomes
oh? do tell. I'm skeptical about that, but that depends on how you would go about doing the filtering, just boiling water and draining thru a coffee filter or two alone will not do it
I don't recall the exact formula off the top of my head, but maybe it is like 2 molecules of Hydrogen + a molecule of Oxegyn + some other random stuff, or something like that, NO filtering required....hahaha :roll:....:eek:...:D
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#9
Ferrum Master
I would put these things in the same shelf with Gamer Girl bathwater :laugh:
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#10
DrCR
I personally only use inorganic water in my watercooling systems.

Jokes aside, I'm glad to have belatedly found out this FrozenCPU history. They, along with jab-tec, were always a go-to before I arrived at "meh, my current build is still good enough" some years ago.
Dave65
Does it come in Synthetic?
i only put synthetic in mine :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
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#11
John Naylor
Amazing what ya can read on the internet ... to bad most of it is wrong.

Most home made distilled water is acidic ... as is most bottled stuff. Distilled water is supposed to have a pH of 7.0 .... good luck with that. Immediately upon being exposed to air, the pH of distilled water decreases rapidly, becoming more acidic. It won't stabilize till it gets to around 5.5 or 5.6. The carbonic acid made from the CO2 reaction breaks down a pair of unstable ions looking to make bonds ... that would be with the metals inside your loop. Neutralizing distilled water is possible, but not in your kitchen and even if ya get close, its neutral pH does not last. Can ya make it yaself ? Sure... start with building a CO2 free chamber
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#12
Mamya3084
John Naylor
Amazing what ya can read on the internet ... to bad most of it is wrong.

Most home made distilled water is acidic ... as is most bottled stuff. Distilled water is supposed to have a pH of 7.0 .... good luck with that. Immediately upon being exposed to air, the pH of distilled water decreases rapidly, becoming more acidic. It won't stabilize till it gets to around 5.5 or 5.6. The carbonic acid made from the CO2 reaction breaks down a pair of unstable ions looking to make bonds ... that would be with the metals inside your loop. Neutralizing distilled water is possible, but not in your kitchen and even if ya get close, its neutral pH does not last. Can ya make it yaself ? Sure... start with building a CO2 free chamber
i would not pay more that $20AUD for a 5L bottle.
There are cheaper alternatives.
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#13
Totally
John Naylor
Amazing what ya can read on the internet ... to bad most of it is wrong.

Most home made distilled water is acidic ... as is most bottled stuff. Distilled water is supposed to have a pH of 7.0 .... good luck with that. Immediately upon being exposed to air, the pH of distilled water decreases rapidly, becoming more acidic. It won't stabilize till it gets to around 5.5 or 5.6. The carbonic acid made from the CO2 reaction breaks down a pair of unstable ions looking to make bonds ... that would be with the metals inside your loop. Neutralizing distilled water is possible, but not in your kitchen and even if ya get close, its neutral pH does not last. Can ya make it yaself ? Sure... start with building a CO2 free chamber
Why go through all that when nickel and copper do not react with pure water on their own, distilling to a high purity is more than enough and easily accomplished.
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#14
argon
I had clc for 2 years (now im air) and always got neoprene tubes with distilled water and 1 drops of red alcohol per liter. Never had any issue of any things, I used to swap water every 2-3 month
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#15
Grog6
Everything reacts with pure water; it's the only known non-enzyme acid and base at the same time.

Your best bet is filtered deionized water; it wont eat metals.

Run DI water thru a drinking water filter that is unused; as long as it's only activated carbon, it will be as good as you can get.

Tapwater is better in your system than distilled pure water; it's at least saturated with metals, and won't absorb more.

As long as there's no metals in your system more active than what's dissolved already, they won't come out of solution.

Chemistry is hard for most people. :D

I agree JN, most of what you read is wrong on the internet. :)
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#16
Ferrum Master
Grog6
Tapwater is better in your system than distilled pure water; it's at least saturated with metals, and won't absorb more.
After few months your system will turn into Jurassic Park. I sometimes adore these suggestions. It is not only about chemistry, but biology too.

Seconds the car industry proved that using tap water mixing with coolant concentrate caused pump failures. There are too much particles in it also. I am not wanting even touch the Water fluoridation topic also.

No one said it was using plain DI. Adding your preferred additives to rise PH and kill the flora and fauna developing. For making a coolant mixture as a base distilled water is perfect.
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#17
Arctucas
Ferrum Master
After few months your system will turn into Jurassic Park. I sometimes adore these suggestions. It is not only about chemistry, but biology too.

Seconds the car industry proved that using tap water mixing with coolant concentrate caused pump failures. There are too much particles in it also. I am not wanting even touch the Water fluoridation topic also.

No one said is was using plain DI. Adding your preferred additives to rise PH and kill the flora and fauna developing. For making a coolant mixture as a base distilled water is perfect.
A couple drops of benzalkonium chloride, and no more biologics.
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#18
Grog6
I use tapwater in my cars; all are over 200k miles, and there have been no water pump failures.

If your local tapwater is hard water, it might precipitate Calcium if you let the anti-freeze go over ~3 years, otherwise it's not going to be a problem with all the additives.

I run 10% green prestone in tapwater, have for the last 30+ years with no ill effects.

And I don't see precipitate in the engines I've upgraded when I take them apart, either.

I do use distilled water in the battery; that is different chemistry; chlorine is bad.

BTW, if you have a water softener, you do not want to use tapwater for anything; Salt is added to it to change the hardess, and it corrodes everything.

www.amazon.com/Morton-Salt-F124700000g-Protect-Softener/dp/B0735G11F3
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#19
Totally
Arctucas
A couple drops of benzalkonium chloride, and no more biologics.
I used to use that stuff+distilled but it's caused the nickel on a couple blocks to scale. I'd recommend that for a copper only loop.
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#20
Jism
Grog6
I use tapwater in my cars; all are over 200k miles, and there have been no water pump failures.

If your local tapwater is hard water, it might precipitate Calcium if you let the anti-freeze go over ~3 years, otherwise it's not going to be a problem with all the additives.

I run 10% green prestone in tapwater, have for the last 30+ years with no ill effects.

And I don't see precipitate in the engines I've upgraded when I take them apart, either.

I do use distilled water in the battery; that is different chemistry; chlorine is bad.

BTW, if you have a water softener, you do not want to use tapwater for anything; Salt is added to it to change the hardess, and it corrodes everything.

www.amazon.com/Morton-Salt-F124700000g-Protect-Softener/dp/B0735G11F3
You think that the water pump might be the only part affected by running tap water into cars? Lol. Try to inspect your block(s) visually. You'll see what tapwater really does. Esp with engines. Lmao.
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#21
Grog6
I have; on multiple occasions.
I have two iron blocks in the garage, and one aluminum one on the stand being built.

I have multiple sets of heads; other than valves being bent thru them in one case, none showed any problems in the water passages. :)
Not even discoloration.

There were no deposits in the engines I disassembled at all. Net even etching patterns.

These were 4.6l V8 engines, both with over 250k miles.

Amazingly enough, the bearings were not worn past the limits of the original shipping tolerances; they were good for another 200k+.

They were removed to replace them with more modern engines, a 98 Teksid DOHC and a 99 PI engine.

I saved the blocks, just in case I want to build something with them in the future.

These engines have Iron, aluminum, bronze, and stainless steel in the coolant systems; using at least 10% antifreeze will keep any corrosion from happening at all.

When they go to the dragstrip, they have to be drained, flushed, and filled with only water, per track rules; There's a $500 charge to clean antifreeze or oil off the track.

Tap water is way less corrosive than distilled water, as I said above.
Tap water contains dissolved metals, where pure water wants to eat metal.

What else would you be thinking might be affected? I'm curious.

BTW, you can test the action of your coolant additives with a voltmeter.
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#22
Jism
Well i can understand your point of view on how much your saving and all that, but tap water is'nt suitable for engine(blocks) for a reason. Just as normal tap water is'nt suitable for coolant into a PC. It adds corrosion and all that you dont really want in there. Perhaps the displacement(s) of your engine is big enough to overcome, but i can name a few such as boiling point of coolant vs tap water being way higher. It's not recommended to put that in your engine while running the AC and standing still in the burning sun. It simply would boil faster compared to normal coolant.

I've done it a few times in times of 'emergency' sort of say, hell we even pissed into the radiator one day because of lack of water nearby (and it worked lol) but again an engine is more confident with running on coolant thats bin given by the manufactor (for a reason, not just $).
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#23
TheGuruStud
Mamya3084
Use car coolant. 2 years and no issues here. Just don't use crappy PETG.
No logic allowed. Why would you use something:
1.) cheap
2.) specifically designed for high heat and antioxidation
3.) lasts 150k miles in an ICE, so lifetime in a PC
4.) compatible with every possible metal, alloy and plastic you'll use it with
5.) cheap
6.) comes in multiple colors

A gallon of long life concentrate (which works perfectly with tap water, it won't precipitate) is 10 bucks.
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#24
Ferrum Master
Jism
hell we even pissed into the radiator one day because of lack of water nearby (and it worked lol)
Holy... :eek:
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#25
fullinfusion
Vanguard Beta Tester
Snake oil in a fool's bottle for suckers right!

Heck I use distilled H20 from a local distiller and an ounce of Colloidal Silver (from the health store) in my loop. it's been over 3 years and no issues at all. The rez is crystal clear as day one, and I don't bother with dyes. I just buy the colored hose I want beit UV reactive or not.
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