Wednesday, May 20th 2020

Intel 10th Generation Core Desktop Processors Start Selling

Intel's 10th generation Core desktop processors started selling as review and retail embargoes lifted earlier today. Despite supply chain constraints, prices of the chips appear surprisingly tame, and close to Intel's announced prices. The retail Core i9-10900K is priced at USD $529 on Newegg, before it quickly ran out of stock. The Core i7-10700K is listed at $409. The mid-range Core i5-10400 is going for $195 (all USD prices without taxes). Across the pond, the i9-10900K is listed for €589, the i9-10900KF for €549, the i7-10700K for €449, the i5-10600K for €309, and the i5-10400F for €183 (all EUR prices inclusive of taxes). Retailers also began shipping socket LGA1200 motherboards for which they started taking pre-orders earlier this month.
Add your own comment

108 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core Desktop Processors Start Selling

#2
Mark Little
The Anandtech review is up:

"The one issue that Intel won’t escape from is that all this extra power requires extra money to be put into cooling the chip. While the Core i9 processor is around the same price as the Ryzen 9 3900X, the AMD processor comes with a 125 W cooler which will do the job – Intel customers will have to go forth and source expensive cooling in order to keep this cool. Speaking with a colleague, he had issues cooling his 10900K test chip with a Corsair H115i, indicating that users should look to spending $150+ on a cooling setup. That’s going to be a critical balancing element here when it comes to recommendations. "

$500 for the Core i9-10900K
$150 for the new motherboard (bare minimum)
$150 for the cooling setup (Your rig must be able to handle 250+ Watts from the CPU alone to get the full performance shown at review sites!)

So its $800 for the privilege to stay with Intel but get nothing notable in return other than a huge energy bill and $800 less in the bank account.

Edit: Based on availability and higher prices, one might have to spend over $1000 to make this upgrade happen.

Edit #2: Again its important to note that you will NOT get higher performance with the higher clocks in games if you cannot prevent this thing from throttling. All Intel did here was increase the clocks and you MUST cool the CPU accordingly or your frame rates will be less than shown on review sites and less than competing chips.
Posted on Reply
#3
WeeRab
Mark Little
The Anandtech review is up:

"The one issue that Intel won’t escape from is that all this extra power requires extra money to be put into cooling the chip. While the Core i9 processor is around the same price as the Ryzen 9 3900X, the AMD processor comes with a 125 W cooler which will do the job – Intel customers will have to go forth and source expensive cooling in order to keep this cool. Speaking with a colleague, he had issues cooling his 10900K test chip with a Corsair H115i, indicating that users should look to spending $150+ on a cooling setup. That’s going to be a critical balancing element here when it comes to recommendations. "

$500 for the Core i9-10900K
$150 for the new motherboard (bare minimum)
$150 for the cooling setup (Your rig must be able to handle 250+ Watts from the CPU alone to get the full performance shown at review sites!)

So its $800 for the privilege to stay with Intel but get nothing notable in return other than a huge energy bill and $800 less in the bank account.

Edit: Based on availability and higher prices, one might have to spend over $1000 to make this upgrade happen.
Yup. It's an expensive proposition.
I thought Anandtech would've at least run something like HWInfo to see what temps the chip was running at - although there was no report of freq throttling. 245W though. Jeez.
Posted on Reply
#4
Cranky5150
More of the same Intel..More of the same....
Posted on Reply
#5
TheinsanegamerN
The most exciting thing here today is the asus strix z490m. A high end 12 phase micro ATX motherboard, something that has been sorely absent from the market for several generations. I'm tempted to build one just so I can go back to my prefered case size.

www.newegg.com/asus-rog-strix-z490-g-gaming/p/N82E16813119294?&quicklink=true

Look at this beautiful thing, slots properly set up so you can use all 3 at once (unlike many that hide the x1 slot if you use a dGPU) 12 phase VRM, 2.5GBe, and $240 isnt that bad a price IMO.
WeeRab
Yup. It's an expensive proposition.
I thought Anandtech would've at least run something like HWInfo to see what temps the chip was running at - although there was no report of freq throttling. 245W though. Jeez.
I mean, sure thats a lot of juice, but the FX-9000 series pulled north of 200 watts, and often need a bit more to run perectly stable, and their heat was manageable. Very dissapointed to see no temperature data from Anandtech, looking forward to seeing what temps people get out of a 10900k with an arctic cooling AIO, and those worked wonders on AMD cpus and worked the best on intels as well. My 9700k with a 120mm AIO only hits the mid 60C range with 186+ watts of power draw, so another 80 watts should be doable with a quality 240mm AIO.
Posted on Reply
#6
AnarchoPrimitiv
Mark Little
The Anandtech review is up:

"The one issue that Intel won’t escape from is that all this extra power requires extra money to be put into cooling the chip. While the Core i9 processor is around the same price as the Ryzen 9 3900X, the AMD processor comes with a 125 W cooler which will do the job – Intel customers will have to go forth and source expensive cooling in order to keep this cool. Speaking with a colleague, he had issues cooling his 10900K test chip with a Corsair H115i, indicating that users should look to spending $150+ on a cooling setup. That’s going to be a critical balancing element here when it comes to recommendations. "

$500 for the Core i9-10900K
$150 for the new motherboard (bare minimum)
$150 for the cooling setup (Your rig must be able to handle 250+ Watts from the CPU alone to get the full performance shown at review sites!)

So its $800 for the privilege to stay with Intel but get nothing notable in return other than a huge energy bill and $800 less in the bank account.

Edit: Based on availability and higher prices, one might have to spend over $1000 to make this upgrade happen.

Edit #2: Again its important to note that you will NOT get higher performance with the higher clocks in games if you cannot prevent this thing from throttling. All Intel did here was increase the clocks and you MUST cool the CPU accordingly or your frame rates will be less than shown on review sites and less than competing chips.
What do they mean "around the same price"? The 3900x is going for $417 right now, $100 or approximately 25% cheaper than the 10900k...how is that considered "around the same price"?
Posted on Reply
#7
Crackong
Meanwhile 3900x is rolling on Amazon for $410.............
Posted on Reply
#8
trparky
I just don't see this chip as being a contender, even less so when AMD Zen 3 comes out. Unless you just have to have Intel (or nothing at all), there is absolutely nothing attractive about this chip. The power consumption alone is scary, the requirements to cool it is downright horrifying.

Good God, it's going to be a bloodbath when Zen 3 comes out.
Posted on Reply
#9
kapone32
trparky
I just don't see this chip as being a contender, even less so when AMD Zen 3 comes out. Unless you just have to have Intel (or nothing at all), there is absolutely nothing attractive about this chip. The power consumption alone is scary, the requirements to cool it is downright horrifying.

Good God, it's going to be a bloodbath when Zen 3 comes out.
Exactly more of the same for even more money. So you can get 5 more FPS for about 750 800 US.
Posted on Reply
#10
Mats
TheinsanegamerN
I mean, sure thats a lot of juice, but the FX-9000 series pulled north of 200 watts, and often need a bit more to run perectly stable, and their heat was manageable.
You forgot the differences. 250 W coming from 200 mm² is not as easy to cool as 250 W coming from 315 mm².

Also, AMD said the TDP is 220 W:

Intel still says 125 W:


I still consider the 10900K to be less of a freak than the FX, because it's more competitive. Don't quote me on that tho, don't remember those FX reviews..
Posted on Reply
#11
W1zzard
Just in case you're wondering about where the TPU reviews are... the samples from Intel USA have been en-route for two weeks now. DHL air freight had major difficulties finding flights... last I heard was they were in Amsterdam, on Monday. National holiday here tomorrow, so maybe Friday.
Posted on Reply
#12
Mark Little
AnarchoPrimitiv
What do they mean "around the same price"? The 3900x is going for $417 right now, $100 or approximately 25% cheaper than the 10900k...how is that considered "around the same price"?
That was a quote from the Anandtech article. I placed quotes around that paragraph. I put the right price for the Intel part of $500 or more in my comment.
Posted on Reply
#13
trparky
W1zzard
Just in case you're wondering about where the TPU reviews are... the samples from Intel USA have been en-route for two weeks now. DHL air freight had major difficulties finding flights... last I heard was they were in Amsterdam, on Monday. National holiday here tomorrow, so maybe Friday.
Well that just sucks. :(
Posted on Reply
#14
Thefumigator
Crackong
Meanwhile 3900x is rolling on Amazon for $410.............
Yeah I got the 3950X this year, and I'm very impressed
Posted on Reply
#15
Mats
W1zzard
National holiday here tomorrow, so maybe Friday.
Excuse my noobility, but where is here?
Posted on Reply
#16
Raendor
Mats
Excuse my noobility, but where is here?
guy mentions Amsterdam, so NL obviously. Or did you skip geography lessons?
W1zzard
Just in case you're wondering about where the TPU reviews are... the samples from Intel USA have been en-route for two weeks now. DHL air freight had major difficulties finding flights... last I heard was they were in Amsterdam, on Monday. National holiday here tomorrow, so maybe Friday.
lol, heb nooit gedacht dat TPU was opgestelt door Nederlandse kerels ;)
Posted on Reply
#17
W1zzard
Mats
Excuse my noobility, but where is here?
Germany
Posted on Reply
#18
Mats
W1zzard
Germany
Sehr gut. Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward to the reviews.
Posted on Reply
#19
xman2007
Mats
Excuse my noobility, but where is here?
Netherlands edit : I stand corrected.
btarunr
Across the pond, the i9-10900K is listed for €589,
If you're going to use a phrase that is almost always used to refer to the UK /US then at least quote in £'s and not euros :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#20
Mats
xman2007
Netherlands
HAHA.

Please, someone else also tell me that here is NL, when Wz already said it's DE.
Posted on Reply
#21
Mark Little
trparky
Well that just sucks. :(
Or blows if you consider the amount of cooling TR will need to review that thing.
Posted on Reply
#22
trparky
Someone over at Anandtech said this (and I quote).
Chasing clocks and high power to counter AMD. Ah, Netburst, good times.
Yep, I agree.
Posted on Reply
#23
Raendor
Mats
LOL that's where the CPU's are (DHL).

Did you skip English lessons? :D


Sehr gut. Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward to the reviews.
lol again, considering tomorrow is a holiday in NL (where you said yourself the cpus are). So what’s exactly your point dumbo :D
Posted on Reply
#24
Mats
Which location W1zzad was referring to, which obviously isn't where the chips are.
W1zzard
Just in case you're wondering about where the TPU reviews are... the samples from Intel USA have been en-route for two weeks now. DHL air freight had major difficulties finding flights... last I heard was they were in Amsterdam, on Monday. National holiday here tomorrow, so maybe Friday.
You're the only one who'll look dumb if you'll ask me a third time, so don't. :p
Posted on Reply
#25
dicktracy
Truly a magnificent gaming processor. It gives so much headroom, you don't need to upgrade every year like you do with AMD. Where's the 14nm+++++ jokes now?

Posted on Reply
Add your own comment