Monday, June 22nd 2020

Honeywell Announces the World's Most Powerful Quantum Computer

Honeywell, a multinational conglomerate specializing in the quantum computing field, today announced they have created the world's most advanced quantum computer. Their new solution brings about a quantum computing volume set at 64 - twice the quantum volume of the world's previous most powerful quantum computer, the IBM Raleigh. You might be looking at that 64 quantum volume, wondering what that means - and where did the qubits metric go. Well, the thing with quantum computers is that the number of qubits can't really be looked at as a definite measure of performance - instead, it's just a part of the "quantum volume" calculation, which expresses the final performance of a quantum system.

When you make operations at the quantum level, a myriad of factors come into play that adversely impact performance besides the absolute number of qubits, such as the calculation error rate (ie, how often the system outputs an erroneous answer to a given problem) as well as the qubit connectivity level. Qubit connectivity expresses a relationship between the quantum hardware capabilities of a given machine and the ability of the system to distribute workloads across qubits - sometimes the workloads can only be distributed to two adjacent qubits, other times, it can be distributed to qubits that are more far apart within the system without losing data coherency and without affecting error rates - thus increasing performance and the systems' flexibility towards processing workloads. If you've seen Alex Garland's Devs series on Hulu (and you should; it's great), you can see a would-be-quantum computer and all its intricate connections. Quantum computers really are magnificent crossovers of science, materials engineering, and computing. Of course, the quantum computing arms race means that Honeywell's system will likely be dethroned by quantum volume rather soon.
Sources: Honeywell, Honeywell Quantum Volume
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28 Comments on Honeywell Announces the World's Most Powerful Quantum Computer

#1
ZoneDymo
well it certainly looks pretty
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#2
natr0n
"From shitty thermostats to quantum computers... we are Honeywell."
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#3
VulkanBros
Before someone else askes ;-) - can it run Crysis
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#4
dinmaster
Third pic from devs tv show maybe the news doesn't need generic pictures?
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#5
oldtimenoob
VulkanBrosBefore someone else askes ;-) - can it run Crysis
You beat me too it.... :)
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#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
I like how the first quantum computers look steampunk.
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#7
bonehead123
VulkanBrosBefore someone else askes ;-) - can it run Crysis
It can, at 1,912,035.784 Qb/S, but only when connected to a 7.26 gazillion-watt psu....hehehehe :roll:..:eek:..:clap:
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#8
Mistral
natr0n"From shitty thermostats to quantum computers... we are Honeywell."
Honeywell makes some of the best thermostats out there. At least according to specialists I've talked with, I have no clue myself.
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#9
AusWolf
Did any of you guys think by the time you reached the end of the article "what the hell did I just read about"? :wtf:
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#10
Houd.ini
btarunrI like how the first quantum computers look steampunk.
And beer brewing. What's not to like?:D
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#11
blobster21
Why does this thing looks so weird ?
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#12
Caring1
We'll just name this, Project Alice. :D
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#13
AusWolf
Houd.iniAnd beer brewing. What's not to like?:D
That, and "I, Robot" as well. :D
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#15
Steevo
VulkanBrosBefore someone else askes ;-) - can it run Crysis
Quantum speak, more of, will it run Crysis and with what probability will it be successful?
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#16
Arcdar
To me it's fascinating - Technology wise as well as esthetics are just purely marvelous. Haven't been as drawn to follow tech-dev since my Pentium 166 days where every development was a big step Forward (or backwards, Looking at Pentium 4 ^^ …. or the Special Pentium II "cardridges" :D ).

To me Quantum-PC's are, like the article states, a pure enjoyment of material/machining/enginuity which I adore and admire a lot :)
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#17
Ashtr1x
I like how they look, something mysterious and nothing like our Semi based machines. But to think of them, the current era of ownership (GaaS, WaaS, IaaS etc BS) is being slowly moving away from people to the corporations like IBM MF era again, with the final node at 3nm and then maybe 2nm ? We might see the Quantum Computing being pushed onto us for the computing needs. That's what I'm guessing and the way how these machines look and that thought of centralized systems, it is giving me the chills of dystopian future.
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#18
NJM1564
Steam punk Star Trek OG. Huh I think I like it.
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#19
Basard
Is this sort of like when they invented the first transistor? I mean, it looks like there is quite a bit of room for miniaturization.

And, why not just bring a few transistors down to near absolute zero and run them at a billion bajigaherts? Or is that a dumb question?
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#20
TheoneandonlyMrK
Ashtr1xI like how they look, something mysterious and nothing like our Semi based machines. But to think of them, the current era of ownership (GaaS, WaaS, IaaS etc BS) is being slowly moving away from people to the corporations like IBM MF era again, with the final node at 3nm and then maybe 2nm ? We might see the Quantum Computing being pushed onto us for the computing needs. That's what I'm guessing and the way how these machines look and that thought of centralized systems, it is giving me the chills of dystopian future.
I wouldn't worry, quantum is not very pliable at the moment, and it's uses are still being researched and assessed.
They're epic at some types of computation but the type is quite limited at the moment.
It's not yet known if they could possibly be used for some types of work, like Ai.
I expect they will never replace conventional computers for regular computation, and will always be specialists at a task, similar to FP unit's.
The TCO will keep them in corporate and educational hands for most of the next decade.
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#21
Divide Overflow
I wonder if they were able to make significant improvements to the error rates of previous models.
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#23
HugsNotDrugs
I really wonder if quantum computing will ever go mainstream.

I'm far more bullish on optical computing first complementing silicon and ultimately replacing it.
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#24
Vulcansheart
VulkanBrosBefore someone else askes ;-) - can it run Crysis
It can run Crysis, and it can't run Crysis at the same time.
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#25
djisas
VulcansheartIt can run Crysis, and it can't run Crysis at the same time.
It could probably play Crysis instead of just running it...
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