Tuesday, June 15th 2021

FSP Announces U3 Power Adapters for Laptops, Mobile Workstation, and SFF Desktops

In order to meet the need for increasingly powerful functions, many terminal devices have been designed with significantly increased product computing capacity and power consumption. Power supplies that serve the purpose of providing power must also increase power wattages to meet large power supply needs. However, must products with high-wattage requirements come with large-capacity power supplies? FSP thinking outside the box of conventional design, has developed adapters with high wattages and compact sizes, thereby meeting users' portability and space-saving needs.

The FSP U3 series ultra-slim adapter 90 W/120 W/135 W is only 2/3 the height of the iPhone 12 Pro. Its size is reduced by 50% compared to products with the same wattages in the market, with the same power and a smaller volume, making it the adapter product with the highest power density in the market at present. Due to its powerful R&D capabilities, the product volume has been substantively reduced while achieving better performance. The U3 series adapters feature conversion efficiency exceeding 90%. Its standby power-saving mode is also in line with DoE Level 6 and CoC v5 Tier 2 specifications.
The compact adapter is intended for AIO computers, gaming machines, NUC, and POS. To end consumers, the N3 product series is easy to carry. To mall businesses, it can avoid space waste; to system integrators (SI), packaging materials for parts and components and shipping costs can be reduced, thereby increasing product profits.

Currently, the U3 Series adapter comes with 90 W/120 W/135 W/150 W/180 W assorted wattages to select from, which are intended for terminal products applied in different fields. The full series of products have also passed multiple safety regulations, such as UL, TUV, CCC, FCC, CE, CB, etc. U3 Series is no doubt a compact and powerful adapter. FSP provides comprehensive standard item and micro-customization services. We welcome system operators to discuss cooperation opportunities with us.

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10 Comments on FSP Announces U3 Power Adapters for Laptops, Mobile Workstation, and SFF Desktops

#1
Chrispy_
These aren't USB-C so unless your laptop OEM happens to choose these FSP supplies for your model they are of no interest to consumers.

So. Much. Landfill.

These old barrel-plug, random voltage laptop AC adapters need to die off sooner rather than later so that people and manufacturers can invest in high-quality, high-value STANDARDISED chargers that will be useful beyond the life of one specific laptop.
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#2
zlobby
Chrispy_These aren't USB-C so unless your laptop OEM happens to choose these FSP supplies for your model they are of no interest to consumers.

So. Much. Landfill.

These old barrel-plug, random voltage laptop AC adapters need to die off sooner rather than later so that people and manufacturers can invest in high-quality, high-value STANDARDISED chargers that will be useful beyond the life of one specific laptop.
Amen! :respect:
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#3
medi01
I count on EU to do the same to notebook chargers, what they successfully did to mobile phone chargers.
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#4
zlobby
medi01I count on EU to do the same to notebook chargers, what they successfully did to mobile phone chargers.
I'm OK even with Apple did. They still retained the proprietary end of the cable but the end is still a standard USB with standard voltages.
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#7
Valantar
Chrispy_These aren't USB-C so unless your laptop OEM happens to choose these FSP supplies for your model they are of no interest to consumers.

So. Much. Landfill.

These old barrel-plug, random voltage laptop AC adapters need to die off sooner rather than later so that people and manufacturers can invest in high-quality, high-value STANDARDISED chargers that will be useful beyond the life of one specific laptop.
I mostly agree, but given that USB-C above 100W was only announced a few weeks ago, this is pretty much a given. At least they are 19V, which is essentially universal, though of course the plugs on laptops are typically the main hindrance rather than the voltage.

These are still interesting though, as I assume they are GaN-based, which means a fantastic combination of very small size and very high efficiency. Should be an excellent choice for an APU SFF desktop or even a low end gaming SFF build using the 180W variant. Could also likely be modified for use as a highly efficient and very small internal PSU in combination with something like a HDPlex 160 (though with 19V output you're still better off using a direct 12V PSU and a 12V PicoPSU, as you don't have to regulate down the 12V current). Still, not really interesting for the general public.
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#8
LabRat 891
Chrispy_These aren't USB-C so unless your laptop OEM happens to choose these FSP supplies for your model they are of no interest to consumers.

So. Much. Landfill.

These old barrel-plug, random voltage laptop AC adapters need to die off sooner rather than later so that people and manufacturers can invest in high-quality, high-value STANDARDISED chargers that will be useful beyond the life of one specific laptop.
DC jacks used to be, simple and robust; they also used to be cheap and easy to replace when abused too. No USB-PD controller to fail, no many-pinned socket to resolder when it gets ripped out. I have a bin full of old laptop power adapters and have found use in them many times over for replacing failed compatible units (inclu HDTV PSU) or for project PSUs. The only eWaste are the ones that die. I get wanting a universal charging standard, but the complications that have come up with USB-C make it a poor choice to address the concern(s) listed. TBQH, we should have 12-55VDC as a standard with -48V preferred to save on conductor costs and maintain interoperability with telecomm, PoE, etc. Plugs are adaptable if all based on a shared, simple standard. You could even charge laptops over PoE common to large networks.
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#9
Valantar
LabRat 891DC jacks used to be, simple and robust; they also used to be cheap and easy to replace when abused too. No USB-PD controller to fail, no many-pinned socket to resolder when it gets ripped out. I have a bin full of old laptop power adapters and have found use in them many times over for replacing failed compatible units (inclu HDTV PSU) or for project PSUs. The only eWaste are the ones that die. I get wanting a universal charging standard, but the complications that have come up with USB-C make it a poor choice to address the concern(s) listed. TBQH, we should have 12-55VDC as a standard with -48V preferred to save on conductor costs and maintain interoperability with telecomm, PoE, etc. Plugs are adaptable if all based on a shared, simple standard. You could even charge laptops over PoE common to large networks.
But DC jacks also used to come in a dozen different types making everything incompatible, even within the same OEM, used to have zero quality control and break with frightening ease (I've seen far more broken barrel jacks than USB-C plugs!), used to lead people to use garbage 3rd party "universal" power supplies, and so on. Everything has drawbacks. 12-55VDC would also be rather silly, given the increased cost for broad input voltage conversion circuitry, not to mention the significant efficiency loss when converting >~35W down to useful PC voltages. With the latest extension USB-C also now essentially does this, with 5-48W capabilities. These were obviously designed long before that standard was announced.
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#10
Chrispy_
Given that almost anything with both a battery and mains adapter these days is running lithium chemistry at 4.2V per cell, surely the best voltage is a multiple of that.

There seems to be some regulation/certification in the way that provides an incentive to keep things at 20V or lower, so why haven't we historically seen more (4.2V*4) 16.8V laptops/devices?

3.25A 20V USB-C charging is ample for the majority of laptops and APU/IGP thin clients that are running SoCs with a 15-45W TDP.
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