Wednesday, October 13th 2021

G.SKILL Announces Flagship Trident Z5 Family DDR5 Memory

G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world's leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, is thrilled to announce the newest extreme performance DDR5 memory, the Trident Z5 RGB and Trident Z5 series, tailor-made for the upcoming next-gen Intel platform. Designed for flagship performance and engineered with high-quality, hand-screened memory ICs, the Trident Z5 family DDR5 memory kits will launch at speeds up to DDR5-6400. At the peak of the memory specification stack stands the ultra-low-latency DDR5-6400 CL36-36-36-76 16GBx2 memory kit, constructed with high-performance Samsung DDR5 memory ICs.

The G.SKILL Trident name is widely known for its amazing overclocking prowess, and the Trident Z5 for the DDR5 generation is no exception. Among the extreme performance memory specifications, the Trident Z5 family will include the incredibly low-latency specification of DDR5-6400 CL36-36-36-76 16GBx2, created with high-quality Samsung DDR5 ICs and best-in-class components. Compared to the standard DDR5-4800 CL40, the vast increase in frequency speed and tighter latency pushes DDR5 performance to new heights. See below for a screenshot of the memory kit validation.
Blazing-Fast DDR5 Extreme Performance
Ushering in a new era of memory performance, DDR5 memory introduces unparalleled data transfer speeds compared to the previous generation. At speeds up to DDR5-6400, the Trident Z5 family memory kits are engineered with high-quality, hand-screened DDR5 ICs to achieve extreme memory performance. The Trident Z5 RGB and Trident Z5 series DDR5 memory kits are the ultimate choice for experiencing ultra-high performance on next-gen DDR5 platforms.

Premium Dual-Texture Heatspreader Design
The all-new Trident Z5 family incorporates hypercar elements into the iconic Trident heatspreader design, creating a sleek and futuristic exterior. Featuring a black brushed aluminium strip inset into a smooth metallic silver or powdered matte black body, and topped with a sleek piano black top bar on the Trident Z5 series or a translucent RGB light bar optimized for smooth lighting on the Trident Z5 RGB series, the Trident Z5 family memory kits are ideal for any PC build themes.

Luminous RGB Lighting
Trident Z5 RGB series feature a completely redesigned RGB light bar with hypercar-like design elements for a sleeker and streamlined appearance. Customize the RGB lighting and enable lighting effects via the G.SKILL Trident Z Lighting Control software, or sync the module lighting with other system components through supported third party motherboard software.

Revolutionary DDR5 Performance & Power Management
Designed to fully utilize the faster frequency speed and boost data transfer rate, each DDR5 IC is implemented with twice the amount of banks and bank groups, as well as a doubled burst length, at 32 banks across 8 banks with a burst length of 16. Combined with a module layout comprised of two 32-bit sub-channels, DDR5 memory is capable of delivering more data than DDR4.

Additionally, DDR5 memory modules are built with an on-board PMIC (power management integrated circuit) chip, allowing better granular power control and more reliable power delivery to improve signal integrity at high frequency speeds. Ultimately, ensuring the highest level of system stability for gaming and for work.

Availability & Specifications
Trident Z5 and Trident Z5 RGB DDR5 memory kits will be available via G.SKILL worldwide distribution partners by November 2021. See below for a table of memory specifications available at launch for the Trident Z5 family.

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16 Comments on G.SKILL Announces Flagship Trident Z5 Family DDR5 Memory

#1
Chaitanya
Interested to find out how much early adopter tax is going to be for this generation.
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#2
Dristun
Alright, here we go, a decent kit! Prices are probably going to be completely insane but at least it's not 4800CL40, lol. 3090 owners, fetch!
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#3
demu
Nah, not interested.
I'll wait for the Trident Z Royal Elite Platinum Plus with Crossed Swords, Oak Leaves and Diamonds -edition (or whatever bling they'll bring for DDR5 kits)...
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#4
RyanOCallaghan01
Wow, those look beautiful. Even more excited to hear about pricing and benchmarks.
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#5
Prima.Vera
Flagship...lol.
When will the real 8400+ MHz come out, how would G-Skill call those?
Posted on Reply
#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
ChaitanyaInterested to find out how much early adopter tax is going to be for this generation.
I'm only hearing bad news on that front.
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#7
R-T-B
Prima.VeraFlagship...lol.
When will the real 8400+ MHz come out, how would G-Skill call those?
...Flagship? Probably another Trident Z5 branded stick with another set of timings, like they did on DDR4 (Trident Z ran the whole gamut, most were flagship sticks at some point).

It's not like flagship is a static target/term.
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#8
deu
Question: besides power usage what advantage does these hold 3200mhz 18-18-18-38? (which effective are half the mhz and half the latency) I get that with DDR5 speed, and yada yada yada, but right now: other than new standard and a little less power, these are sub-performing RAM? (I actually asking to understand whether or not I comprehend it.
Posted on Reply
#9
trsttte
deuQuestion: besides power usage what advantage does these hold 3200mhz 18-18-18-38? (which effective are half the mhz and half the latency) I get that with DDR5 speed, and yada yada yada, but right now: other than new standard and a little less power, these are sub-performing RAM? (I actually asking to understand whether or not I comprehend it.
TL : DR

source

Besides the improved features first gen DDR5 (like ECC, though limited, by default), the problem is first gen will still have problems that will make it on par/worse than current DDR4 (which was already heavely optimised in terms of design and fabrication)

As a side note, DDR4 3200mhz 18-18-18-38 is pretty bad, even at 3600 anything should have at least CL16 (not 16-16-16 but 16-18-18 for example)
Posted on Reply
#10
GerKNG
am i the only one who sees that this is acutally quad channel?
Posted on Reply
#11
deu
trsttteTL : DR

source

Besides the improved features first gen DDR5 (like ECC, though limited, by default), the problem is first gen will still have problems that will make it on par/worse than current DDR4 (which was already heavely optimised in terms of design and fabrication)

As a side note, DDR4 3200mhz 18-18-18-38 is pretty bad, even at 3600 anything should have at least CL16 (not 16-16-16 but 16-18-18 for example)
I have 16-16-16-36 @3600 mhz myself ;p
Posted on Reply
#12
blu3dragon
trsttteTL : DR

source

Besides the improved features first gen DDR5 (like ECC, though limited, by default), the problem is first gen will still have problems that will make it on par/worse than current DDR4 (which was already heavely optimised in terms of design and fabrication)

As a side note, DDR4 3200mhz 18-18-18-38 is pretty bad, even at 3600 anything should have at least CL16 (not 16-16-16 but 16-18-18 for example)
So dual channel DDR5 6400 CL36 should be the equivalent in performance to quad channel DDR4 3200 CL18.

Or to put it another way. DDR5 6400CL36 has double the bandwidth of DDR4 3200CL18, while keeping latency the same.
Posted on Reply
#13
trsttte
blu3dragonSo dual channel DDR5 6400 CL36 should be the equivalent in performance to quad channel DDR4 3200 CL18.

Or to put it another way. DDR5 6400CL36 has double the bandwidth of DDR4 3200CL18, while keeping latency the same.
You can't make a direct equivalence like that, for example dual/quad channel DDR5 is not the same as DDR4, it has double the channels but eachs channels has half the bus size.

It's better, it will be much better in the long run, right now only if you don't mind paying the premium imo (even more so because of shortages)
Posted on Reply
#14
blu3dragon
trsttteYou can't make a direct equivalence like that, for example dual/quad channel DDR5 is not the same as DDR4, it has double the channels but eachs channels has half the bus size.

It's better, it will be much better in the long run, right now only if you don't mind paying the premium imo (even more so because of shortages)
Not saying it won't be better. It will in any bandwidth limited situation.

Look at the burst lengths. Multiply that by the bus width. I think 2 dimms (giving 4x32 bit channels) of DDR5 is going to be very similar to quad channel (4x64 bits) of ddr4.
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#15
AteXIleR
I don't like these latencies. It is not surprising though. I'll not upgrade to DDR5 for years, until it will have already not been refined.
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#16
InVasMani
G. Skill alpha stages of DDR5 bedazzled look officially begins.
Posted on Reply
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