Thursday, October 28th 2021

VESA Publishes Embedded DisplayPort Standard Version 1.5

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA ) announced today that it has published the Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) Standard version 1.5. Replacing eDP 1.4b, published in 2015, eDP 1.5 retains all key features of the previous specification while adding additional capabilities and performance. These include an improved panel self-refresh protocol coupled with enhancements to VESA's Adaptive-Sync protocol, a combination that results in added power savings and improved motion image quality.

For devices such as laptop PCs with an embedded display, eDP is the electrical interface for transporting video data from the system's graphics hardware to the internal display panel. eDP is widely adopted for larger, higher-resolution displays as it provides the highest resolutions, refresh rates and color depths using a low wire count with low EMI radiation. Enhancements to the eDP standard have continued since its introduction more than 10 years ago, thanks to contributions by major OEMs through the VESA organization. eDP applications include laptops, all-in-one PCs, premium tablets, automotive displays, and other systems that incorporate a display panel with a video or graphics video source.
Improving power optimization

As with the previous spec version, eDP 1.5 supports panel self-refresh, a key power-saving feature in the standard. With panel self-refresh, static screen images are stored in the display memory while other parts of the system enter a low-power standby state. The system can momentarily awaken to update all or part of the display as needed. This offers significant power savings in typical PC or tablet usage applications. The panel self-refresh function was further optimized in eDP 1.5 with the addition of an enhanced Panel Replay protocol that provides even more power savings as well as improved display performance, including compatibility with Adaptive-Sync.

Other new protocols developed for eDP 1.5 include the ability to disable the display interface during normal operation (when not using panel self-refresh) during the vertical blanking period, which provides added power savings. eDP 1.5 also adds protocol support for new panel types, such as certain organic light emitting diode (OLED) panels, that feature extended display persistence and, thus, low refresh capability, without the need for a frame buffer.

Improving gaming and media playback performance

While eDP has long supported Adaptive-Sync for power saving and frame rate control for gaming, eDP 1.5 adds new Adaptive-Sync capabilities. For the playback of movies or video streaming, a new protocol was added to allow small frame rate adjustments to prevent skipping or repeated frames. For panels with a wide frame rate capability deployed in gaming systems, new mechanisms were added to reduce display flicker.

As with the previous spec version, eDP 1.5 continues to support the utilization of VESA's DisplayHDR and DisplayHDR True Black specifications - bringing vivid, life-like high dynamic range (HDR) content with the high color and contrast accuracy assured by these standards to embedded display applications.
Source: VESA
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7 Comments on VESA Publishes Embedded DisplayPort Standard Version 1.5

#1
AnarchoPrimitiv
I just want to see DisplayPort 2.0 released... Not that'd I'd be able to afford a monitor likely to require such bandwidth, but it's just weird that HDMI is currently the more advanced of the two, ha.
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#2
bug
AnarchoPrimitivI just want to see DisplayPort 2.0 released... Not that'd I'd be able to afford a monitor likely to require such bandwidth, but it's just weird that HDMI is currently the more advanced of the two, ha.
It's always been this way. Whoever releases the most recent spec, goes into the front seat.
A new DP (or HDMI) spec at this point would be mostly irrelevant since it will take the better part of the decade till we could afford video cards implementing them. Or monitors.

A real step forward would be if HDMI or DP kicked the bucket so we can connect everything to everything else.
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#3
Mysteoa
bugIt's always been this way. Whoever releases the most recent spec, goes into the front seat.
A new DP (or HDMI) spec at this point would be mostly irrelevant since it will take the better part of the decade till we could afford video cards implementing them. Or monitors.

A real step forward would be if HDMI or DP kicked the bucket so we can connect everything to everything else.
HDMI is more likely to stay because it has wider spread and Publishers like the anti-pirating options, but on the other hand you need to pay license fees.
Posted on Reply
#4
bug
MysteoaHDMI is more likely to stay because it has wider spread and Publishers like the anti-pirating options, but on the other hand you need to pay license fees.
They're both here to stay, that was just my wishful thinking.
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#5
trsttte
AnarchoPrimitivI just want to see DisplayPort 2.0 released... Not that'd I'd be able to afford a monitor likely to require such bandwidth, but it's just weird that HDMI is currently the more advanced of the two, ha.
There were some reports stating Intel Arc GPUs will have it. According to thisAMD is also preparing their drivers for it so future cards are likely to have
bugA real step forward would be if HDMI or DP kicked the bucket so we can connect everything to everything else.
MysteoaHDMI is more likely to stay because it has wider spread and Publishers like the anti-pirating options, but on the other hand you need to pay license fees.
Display Port port is also compatible with the same drm standards, at this point they're more or less just competing standards (hdmi has extra stuff for home theater but it's not like DP couldn't also included, there just doesn't seem to be any interest). DP uses a better connector (includes locking), bandwidth wise they're always one after the other (currently hdmi is better, soon DP will be better, rinse repeat)

A single standard would be better but at this point best would happen is a third standard would appear
Posted on Reply
#6
blanarahul
UskompufFor the playback of movies or video streaming, a new protocol was added to allow small frame rate adjustments to prevent skipping or repeated frames.
Nice. Now we only need laptop OEMs to actually include Adaptive Sync in their products.

When most monitor OEMs offer products with 75 Hz displays and 48 - 75 Hz VRR range, it is beyond me why laptop OEMs cannot do the same.

My biggest gripe is with the OEMs that give 144 Hz laptop displays without VRR. I am not asking for best in class. Just 48 - 144 Hz will be good enough.
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#7
trsttte
blanarahulNice. Now we only need laptop OEMs to actually include Adaptive Sync in their products.

When most monitor OEMs offer products with 75 Hz displays and 48 - 75 Hz VRR range, it is beyond me why laptop OEMs cannot do the same.

My biggest gripe is with the OEMs that give 144 Hz laptop displays without VRR. I am not asking for best in class. Just 48 - 144 Hz will be good enough.
The problem is the hybrid tech that got shoved down everyone's throats (nvidia optimus and whatever amd calls their version of it)

OLED thats getting popular now also presents new challenges (combining VRR with anti burn-in)
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Jun 25th, 2022 09:51 EDT change timezone

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