Tuesday, November 9th 2021

Noctua Introduces NH-L9i Low-profile CPU Coolers for LGA1700 and NA-FD1 Fan Duct

Noctua today introduced new, LGA1700-specific revisions of its award-winning NH-L9i and NH-L9i chromax.black low-profile CPU coolers. The new NH-L9i-17xx and NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black are ideal for building ultra-compact HTPCs and Small Form Factor (SFF) systems using Intel's brand new 12th generation Core processors such as the Core i9-12900K, Core i7-12700K or Core i5-12600K. The new, optional NA-FD1 fan duct makes it possible to further improve the performance of the coolers by bridging the gap between the fan and perforated case panels in order to enable the coolers to draw in fresh air from the outside.

"We're very happy with the performance of the NH-L9i-17xx coolers on Intel's new LGA1700 CPUs", says Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO). "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz. These are excellent results for such small coolers, making them fantastic options for highly compact Intel Z690 builds that pack a lot of processing power!"
The NH-L9i-17xx and the all-black NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black are the latest, LGA1700-specific revisions of Noctua's award-winning NH-L9i low-profile CPU cooler. At a height of only 37 mm, the NH-L9i is ideal for extremely slim cases and, due to its small footprint, it provides 100% RAM and PCIe compatibility as well as easy access to near-socket connectors even on tightly packed Mini-ITX motherboards. The custom-designed SecuFirm 2 mounting system for the new LGA1700 socket makes installation a breeze and, thanks to the highly optimised NF-A9x14 92 mm fan that supports fully automatic speed control via PWM, the NH-L9i-17xx runs remarkably quietly. Topped off with Noctua's renowned NT-H1 thermal compound, the NH-L9i-17xx combines everything users have come to expect from Noctua's larger coolers into a super-compact, premium-quality package for ITX and HTPC builds with Intel's new 12th generation Core CPUs.

"For Small Form Factor builds, we now highly recommend the optional NA-FD1 fan duct kit, both to customers choosing the new NH-L9i-17xx models and to users of the existing NH-L9i and NH-L9a heatsinks", explains Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO). "It's a simple yet highly effective way of boosting the performance of these coolers in compact cases. Tech-savvy enthusiasts have been creating similar ducts with their 3D printers for quite some time, but not everyone has the capabilities to do this, so we thought it would be great to offer an affordable, flexible duct kit that doesn't require any special equipment or skills to set up."

The new NA-FD1 fan duct kit makes it possible to significantly improve the performance of Noctua NH-L9i and NH-L9a series CPU coolers in Small Form Factor (SFF) environments where there is a gap of 5 mm or more (up to 45 mm) between the cooler and a perforated top or side panel. Bridging this gap, the duct prevents the cooler from taking in hot air from the interior and enables it to draw in fresh air from the outside through the perforated panel, which can, depending on the setup, improve CPU temperatures by as much as 5°C or more. As the duct is assembled from EVA foam spacers of different thickness, it is fully modular and can be adjusted in 1 mm increments from 5 mm to 45 mm height in order to fit various different cases and configurations. In short, the NA-FD1 is a simple yet smart, flexible, and cost-effective way of boosting the efficiency of NH-L9a and NH-L9i series coolers

The manufacturer's suggested retail prices are as follows:
  • NH-L9i-17xx: EUR/USD 44.90
  • NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black: EUR/USD 54.90
  • NA-FD1: EUR/USD 12.90
For more information, visit the product pages of the NH-L9i, NH-L9i chromax.black, and NA-FD1.
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131 Comments on Noctua Introduces NH-L9i Low-profile CPU Coolers for LGA1700 and NA-FD1 Fan Duct

#27
Dredi
MetroidYes total power, cpu alone does 95% of that or more, there is no gpu on it, only the cpu.
It does not do 95% of that or more. The PSU uses 10% or more, the motherboards VRM uses 10% or so, the GPU idles at something like 20W or so (just go look at the TPU review of it). The motherboard uses some watts, and the same goes for the NVME drive etc.

The actual heat that the CPU alone pumps out is around 150W max for the 12600k unless manually overclocked.
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#28
Metroid
DrediIt does not do 95% of that or more. The PSU uses 10% or more, the motherboards VRM uses 10% or so, the GPU idles at something like 20W or so (just go look at the TPU review of it). The motherboard uses some watts, and the same goes for the NVME drive etc.

The actual heat that the CPU alone pumps out is around 150W max for the 12600k unless manually overclocked.
I'm not sure how the reviewer have done the test, usually system idle is around 30 to 60 watts. Anandtech does a good job on full power of the cpu and only the cpu.



My ryzen 5900x uses a 150w aio 240mm cooler and yet it cant cool down a 140 watts cpu. So reason I laughed noctua came up with a low profile cooler using a 12900k hehe, not even their top air cooler can do the job well on that 12900k.
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#29
ExcuseMeWtf
Metroidb: I never said they claimed, I said this is not enough for that, yes they cited the 12900k in their tests which in my opinion was a mistake. This low profile cooler is not for the 12900k and yet they included in the tests to brag.
They were specific about what conditions regarding 12900K they used. They didn't claim 300W or some insane overclocks which it probably indeed can't do. How does it make sense to hold it against them? This is clearly not a product for such use case, so... don't buy it if that's your use case. It's not that hard. You don't go complaining at all random third party replacements for BOX cooler that they can't handle 12900K@300W either, do you?
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#30
Dredi
MetroidI'm not sure how the reviewer have done the test, usually system idle is around 30 to 60 watts. Anandtech does a good job on full power of the cpu and only the cpu.

Yes, the 12900k can peak at 272 watts at a high AVX2 load. As you can see that peak is short lived and does not represent what the actual long term heat load is.

Even the worst case load that lasts for a second or so, the package power (and the heat load) is well below the 300W you have erroreously stated.

Can the mentioned noctua coolers keep this type of processor running at indefinite turbo? No. Have they stated such a thing to be possible? Also no.
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#31
napata
MetroidI'm not sure how the reviewer have done the test, usually system idle is around 30 to 60 watts. Anandtech does a good job on full power of the cpu and only the cpu.



My ryzen 5900x uses a 150w aio 240mm cooler and yet it cant cool down a 140 watts cpu. So reason I laughed noctua came up with a low profile cooler using a 12900k hehe, not even their top air cooler can do the job well on that 12900k.
It's running unlocked here, which isn't stock. Stock 12900k = 241W max. 150W for the 11600K. These are actual limits.

I already told you you can't compare different CPUs. Surprised how hot a 5900x runs if you need a 240mm AIO for only 150W though. That can't be right? I'd understand it if it was a 5800x but a 5900x should run cooler. 150W is nothing for a 12C CPU. I know Zen 3 runs hot but it shouldn't run that hot.
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#32
Metroid
ExcuseMeWtfThey were specific about what conditions regarding 12900K they used. They didn't claim 300W or some insane overclocks which it probably indeed can't do. How does it make sense to hold it against them? This is clearly not a product for such use case, so... don't buy it if that's your use case. It's not that hard. You don't go complaining at all random third party replacements for BOX cooler that they can't handle 12900K@300W either, do you?
Yeah , not specific but they used it for bragging rights hehe, why didn't they use their top air cooler and compare both? They sent a wrong message, to me this backfired on them, testing low profile cpu cooler on top end cpu ehhe
DrediYes, the 12900k can peak at 272 watts at a high AVX2 load. As you can see that peak is short lived and does not represent what the actual long term heat load is.

Even the worst case load that lasts for a second or so, the package power (and the heat load) is well below the 300W you have erroreously stated.

Can the mentioned noctua coolers keep this type of processor running at indefinite turbo? No. Have they stated such a thing to be possible? Also no.
Default clocks full package 272w , close to 300 watts, yes is not 300 watts, my bad hehe
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#33
R0H1T
napataIt's running unlocked here, which isn't stock.
ADL is running at stock, there's no OC mentioned on AT.
napataStock 12900k = 241W max.
That's not a hard limit, it never is! Your power usage will depend on the workload, cooling, motherboard (VRM & BIOS) as well as the actual Silicon quality, if you can call it that, of the chip.
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#34
ExcuseMeWtf
Yeah , not specific but they used it for bragging rights hehe, why didn't they use their top air cooler and compare both? They sent a wrong message, to me this backfired on them, testing low profile cpu cooler on top end cpu ehhe
Again, DIFFERENT USE CASE. In more ways than one actually.

"Top air cooler" won't even fit in many cases (as in PC cases) this is intended to fit in, so how would it even be relevant comparison?
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#35
Metroid
napataIt's running unlocked here, which isn't stock. Stock 12900k = 241W max. 150W for the 11600K. These are actual limits.

I already told you you can't compare different CPUs. Surprised how hot a 5900x runs if you need a 240mm AIO for only 150W though. That can't be right? I'd understand it if it was a 5800x but a 5900x should run cooler. 150W is nothing for a 12C CPU. I know Zen 3 runs hot but it shouldn't run that hot.
The way i see is a 150 watts cooler supposed to be for a 150 watts cpu or lower, that is using the kiss rule. Intel states is a 125w which is not true 125, as we could see that 125w transformed into a 272w volcano beast ehhe
ExcuseMeWtfAgain, DIFFERENT USE CASE. In more ways than one actually.

"Top air cooler" won't even fit in many cases (as in PC cases) this is intended to fit in, so how would it even be relevant comparison?
Yes right, so why did they use a 12900k in their tests? that is low profile cpu cooler, like i said before misdirection on their PR team.
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#36
Dredi
MetroidDefault clocks full package 272w , close to 300 watts, yes is not 300 watts, my bad hehe
You stated that it was over 300 Watts. Please stop with your nonsense.

You also stated that 12600k consumes over 300 Watts. That is wrong by a factor of 2.
MetroidCheck the tests on even a 12600, it hits 300 watts very easily
Posted on Reply
#37
Metroid
DrediYou stated that it was over 300 Watts. Please stop with your nonsense.

You also stated that 12600k consumes over 300 Watts. That is wrong by a factor of 2.
It does on overclock, not default clocks. So I have not lied, it does use more than 300 watts overclocked. Why can't you accept the fact alder lake is a fail? anyway, this is not the topic.

Look, i hope you are not blind, I will post the 12600k once again, that is clear 319 watts.

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#38
ExcuseMeWtf
Yes right, so why did they use a 12900k in their tests? that is low profile cpu cooler, like i said before misdirection on their PR team.
Because they can. Or rather "the cooler can". At least with those parameters it's entirely believable. If so, then it wouldn't be false advertising, just sth that's not very relevant to you, or most ppl really, so makes more sense to just ignore that bit instead of making mountain out of molehill.
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#39
Dredi
MetroidIt does on overclock, not default clocks. So I have not lied, it does use more than 300 watts overclocked. Why can't you accept the fact alder lake is a fail? anyway, this is not the topic.

Look, i hope you are not blind, I will post the 12600k once again, that is clear 319 watts.

And since when should cooler manufacturers comply with overclocked powerconsumptions?

And you again posted some bullshit wall socket power consumption numbers. THE PROCESSOR DOES NOT HAVE AN AC PLUG!

By that metric the said cooler cannot manage to cool even a puny 5600x or a stock 11400f.
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#40
Metroid
DrediAnd since when should cooler manufacturers comply with overclocked powerconsumptions?

And you again posted some bullshit wall socket power consumption numbers. THE PROCESSOR DOES NOT HAVE AN AC PLUG!
You are losing focus here, please be focused. Anyway, like i said previously that is clear 319 watts, so i will say again, it used more than 300 watts. So I have not lied or made it up, why can't you accept that? It's so hard to see the image and not accept the truth?
Posted on Reply
#41
napata
R0H1TADL is running at stock, there's no OC mentioned on AT.

That's not a hard limit, it never is! Your power usage will depend on the workload, cooling, motherboard (VRM) as well as the actual Silicon quality, if you can call it that, of the chip.
I'm ignoring PL4 here, which is the true hard limit. On average it runs at 241W in any long term workload. Intel CPUs follow their limits very close, unless you run them unlocked. What happens on worse silicon? They downclock harder.

Intel defines their turbo boost power limit as follows:
The maximum sustained (>1s) power dissipation of the processor as limited by current and/or temperature controls. Instantaneous power may exceed Maximum Turbo Power for short durations (<=10ms).

Transient load spikes are not important for cooling. It doesn't matter for cooling either that a 3090 has spikes upto 600W.
MetroidThe way i see is a 150 watts cooler supposed to be for a 150 watts cpu or lower, that is using the kiss rule. Intel states is a 125w which is not true 125, as we could see that 125w transformed into a 272w volcano beast ehhe
I get that people like easy to compare numbers but unfortunately thermodynamics aren't that easy. Which AIO do you have because I can not imagine any AIO cooler would say they can only cool 150W.

Noctua has an excellent article on why using TDPs are stupid.

noctua.at/en/noctua-standardised-performance-rating

Especially point 2 is relevant to my point.
The second key problem is that the amount of heat that a cooler can dissipate can vary greatly from CPU to CPU. For example, the same cooler may be able to dissipate 250W on CPU A but only 150W on CPU B. In particular, CPUs with smaller chips (DIEs) and smaller integrated heat-spreaders (IHS) are much more difficult to cool than larger ones that emit the same amount of heat. In addition to these differences that are due to different heat flux densities, other aspects such as internal DIE configuration and placement on the processor package, as well as the maximum allowed temperature of the processors, also lead to significant variations from model to model. Assigning a general TDP rating to a CPU cooler can therefore end up being misleading as well.
Posted on Reply
#42
rares495
I've used the NH-L9a in a SFF Ryzen 3400G build and it barely kept up there. I think this will work well with the LGA1700 celerons, pentiums and maybe up to the cheapest i3 but anything more than that is a no.

Their claim of 160W is ridiculous at best.
Posted on Reply
#43
Dredi
MetroidYou are losing focus here, please be focused. Anyway, like i said previously that is clear 319 watts, so i will say again, it used more than 300 watts. So I have not lied or made it up, why can't you accept that? It's so hard to see the image and not accept the truth?
Yes, the ENTIRE COMPUTER used more than 300 Watts. The PROCESSOR did not.

The power supply has a efficiency of about 90% and the same for the VRM. Even if the GPU and mobo didn’t use a single Watt the PROCESSOR would still consume a maximum of 260 Watts overclocked.

You can probably make the 12600k go even to 500W if using liquid nitrogen though. VERY RELEVANT.
Posted on Reply
#44
R0H1T
napataThey downclock harder
That depends, are you going to fix clocks on them to run them like a volcano?
napataIntel defines their turbo boost power limit as follows:
You do realize that with ADL you have unlimited turbo? Of course depending on cooling. For instance on a D15 running peak AVX2 loads ADL will run hotter, consume more energy & waste more energy (dissipate heat) as opposed to a 360mm AIO so as long as it remains under Tjmax.
napataNoctua has an excellent article on why using TDPs are stupid.
Yes TDP's are irrelevant today for all 3 brands, I'm including Nvidia here.
Posted on Reply
#45
Metroid
napataI get that people like easy to compare numbers but unfortunately thermodynamics aren't that easy. Which AIO do you have because I can not imagine any AIO cooler would say they can only cool 150W.
It's a Masterliquid 240mm.

Review here www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/cooler-master-masterliquid-ml240r-rgb-review,10.html

"Today's tested cooler will work with any processor from low to high-end quad-core and six-core including up-to 150W. "

That aio cooler is good for up to 150w cpu. It works well if my rzyen is 140 watts or lower, if more, it cant keep it up.
Posted on Reply
#46
Dredi
Metroid"Today's tested cooler will work with any processor from low to high-end quad-core and six-core including up-to 150W. "
They at no point tried to verify that claim.
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#47
Metroid
DrediThey at no point tried to verify that claim.
Usually a 240mm aio cooler is for up to 150 watts cpus and no more, a 360mm a bit more 200 watts, a 120mm for 100 watts or less.

Anyway, here is another article about it

"1. Cooler Master LC240E RGB - This is a cooler with 240mm radiator, dual MF120R RGB fans and a 130W TDP rating. You can get it on Amazon for around $70."

www.binarytides.com/aio-liquid-cooler-specs-explained/
Posted on Reply
#48
Dredi
MetroidUsually a 240mm aio cooler is for up to 150 watts cpus and no more, a 360mm a bit more 200 watts, a 120mm for 100 watts or less.
Said by who? There are plenty of 120mm AIOs in select GPUs that do 300+Watts (for real this time).
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#49
Metroid
DrediSaid by who? There are plenty of 120mm AIOs in select GPUs that do 300+Watts (for real this time).
With delta fans they can even do 500 watts ehhe, jokes aside, very high static pressure is king, so yes it depends on things but radiator wise a 240mm and normal fan is up to 150w. Anyway this is off topic.
Posted on Reply
#50
dyonoctis
MetroidIt does on overclock, not default clocks. So I have not lied, it does use more than 300 watts overclocked. Why can't you accept the fact alder lake is a fail? anyway, this is not the topic.

Look, i hope you are not blind, I will post the 12600k once again, that is clear 319 watts.

In Noctua chart "compatible" doesn't mean : " 5GHZ OC all core while rendering all day long with temps below 70°c". Compatible can mean that the CPU can run without throttling, even if the max boost clock can't be reached. It's not ideal, but people using such a tiny cooler knows that they aren't going for maximal performance and silence.

125w is basically the base power of the 12600k, and 4.3 Ghz isn't the maximum boost of the core i5 at stock settings. zen2 isn't compatible, but some zen 3 are :/


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