Tuesday, November 9th 2021

Noctua Introduces NH-L9i Low-profile CPU Coolers for LGA1700 and NA-FD1 Fan Duct

Noctua today introduced new, LGA1700-specific revisions of its award-winning NH-L9i and NH-L9i chromax.black low-profile CPU coolers. The new NH-L9i-17xx and NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black are ideal for building ultra-compact HTPCs and Small Form Factor (SFF) systems using Intel's brand new 12th generation Core processors such as the Core i9-12900K, Core i7-12700K or Core i5-12600K. The new, optional NA-FD1 fan duct makes it possible to further improve the performance of the coolers by bridging the gap between the fan and perforated case panels in order to enable the coolers to draw in fresh air from the outside.

"We're very happy with the performance of the NH-L9i-17xx coolers on Intel's new LGA1700 CPUs", says Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO). "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz. These are excellent results for such small coolers, making them fantastic options for highly compact Intel Z690 builds that pack a lot of processing power!"
The NH-L9i-17xx and the all-black NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black are the latest, LGA1700-specific revisions of Noctua's award-winning NH-L9i low-profile CPU cooler. At a height of only 37 mm, the NH-L9i is ideal for extremely slim cases and, due to its small footprint, it provides 100% RAM and PCIe compatibility as well as easy access to near-socket connectors even on tightly packed Mini-ITX motherboards. The custom-designed SecuFirm 2 mounting system for the new LGA1700 socket makes installation a breeze and, thanks to the highly optimised NF-A9x14 92 mm fan that supports fully automatic speed control via PWM, the NH-L9i-17xx runs remarkably quietly. Topped off with Noctua's renowned NT-H1 thermal compound, the NH-L9i-17xx combines everything users have come to expect from Noctua's larger coolers into a super-compact, premium-quality package for ITX and HTPC builds with Intel's new 12th generation Core CPUs.

"For Small Form Factor builds, we now highly recommend the optional NA-FD1 fan duct kit, both to customers choosing the new NH-L9i-17xx models and to users of the existing NH-L9i and NH-L9a heatsinks", explains Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO). "It's a simple yet highly effective way of boosting the performance of these coolers in compact cases. Tech-savvy enthusiasts have been creating similar ducts with their 3D printers for quite some time, but not everyone has the capabilities to do this, so we thought it would be great to offer an affordable, flexible duct kit that doesn't require any special equipment or skills to set up."

The new NA-FD1 fan duct kit makes it possible to significantly improve the performance of Noctua NH-L9i and NH-L9a series CPU coolers in Small Form Factor (SFF) environments where there is a gap of 5 mm or more (up to 45 mm) between the cooler and a perforated top or side panel. Bridging this gap, the duct prevents the cooler from taking in hot air from the interior and enables it to draw in fresh air from the outside through the perforated panel, which can, depending on the setup, improve CPU temperatures by as much as 5°C or more. As the duct is assembled from EVA foam spacers of different thickness, it is fully modular and can be adjusted in 1 mm increments from 5 mm to 45 mm height in order to fit various different cases and configurations. In short, the NA-FD1 is a simple yet smart, flexible, and cost-effective way of boosting the efficiency of NH-L9a and NH-L9i series coolers

The manufacturer's suggested retail prices are as follows:
  • NH-L9i-17xx: EUR/USD 44.90
  • NH-L9i-17xx chromax.black: EUR/USD 54.90
  • NA-FD1: EUR/USD 12.90
For more information, visit the product pages of the NH-L9i, NH-L9i chromax.black, and NA-FD1.
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131 Comments on Noctua Introduces NH-L9i Low-profile CPU Coolers for LGA1700 and NA-FD1 Fan Duct

#1
Metroid
lol, how can this thing can possible cool a 300 watts cpu. This can only be a joke.
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#2
Guwapo77
Metroidlol, how can this thing can possible cool a 300 watts cpu. This can only be a joke.
This should work. What isn't pictured is the air duct supplying cool air from outside the case. I personally think these are not good for clear panel cases, but for a small form factor like a Dell computer case, it will do the trick. Dell has been using these ugly air ducts for decades and they appear to work well.
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#3
napata
Metroidlol, how can this thing can possible cool a 300 watts cpu. This can only be a joke.
Maybe you should first read the article before commenting.
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#4
Metroid
napataMaybe you should first read the article before commenting.
I read and I dont believe that thing can cool a 300 watts cpu. The can say anything they want about testing and the bs, I still dont believe it. Not even my 240mm aio can cool a ryzen 150 watts well.
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#5
R0H1T
It won't at peak AVX loads, Once past 150W this thing cannot keep up!
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#7
freeagent
Probably for the quad core that’s coming..

Even with their duct 300w is not in the cards..
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#8
Cobain
Metroidlol, how can this thing can possible cool a 300 watts cpu. This can only be a joke.
Wich means it is not a good cooler for Cinebench. But it will work great on... gaming.
Posted on Reply
#9
napata
MetroidI read and I dont believe that thing can cool a 300 watts cpu. The can say anything they want about testing and the bs, I still dont believe it. Not even my 240mm aio can cool a ryzen 150 watts well.
"We're very happy with the performance of the NH-L9i-17xx coolers on Intel's new LGA1700 CPUs", says Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO). "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz. These are excellent results for such small coolers, making them fantastic options for highly compact Intel Z690 builds that pack a lot of processing power!"
Clearly you did not. Why lie?
Not even my 240mm aio can cool a ryzen 150 watts well.
The fact that you say this, tells me everything I need to know about your knowledge of cooling. 150W on CPU A does not require the same cooling as 150W on CPU B. How do people not know this? There's a ton of factors, outside of which cooler you use, that influence how easy it is to get heat away from your cores. Why do you think this cooler can handle 160W on a 12900k but only 125W on a 12600K? The answer to this question is one of these factors.
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#10
ExcuseMeWtf
Metroidlol, how can this thing can possible cool a 300 watts cpu. This can only be a joke.
Where did you see 300W claim?

> "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz. These are excellent results for such small coolers, making them fantastic options for highly compact Intel Z690 builds that pack a lot of processing power!"

EDIT: Ninja'd
Posted on Reply
#11
R0H1T
Good video to install it ~

Posted on Reply
#12
Metroid
ExcuseMeWtfWhere did you see 300W claim?

> "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz. These are excellent results for such small coolers, making them fantastic options for highly compact Intel Z690 builds that pack a lot of processing power!"
Check the tests on even a 12600, it hits 300 watts very easily, probably they used few cores instead of all cores, meaning it's a fake test, people dont stay checking the cpu temp everytime they do something, so want to be safe than sorry? then cpu hits 300 watts real, then buy a 400 watts real cooler minimum and pray everything will work good, 300 watts is threadripper territory. I remember that i had to make a custom watercooling setup with a 480mm monster on my i7 920 at 4.2, it used to hit 350 watts real.
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#13
ExcuseMeWtf
MetroidCheck the tests on even a 12600, it hits 300 watts very easily, probably they used few cores instead of all cores, meaning it's a fake test, people dont stay checking the cpu temp everytime they do something, so want to be safe than sorry? then cpu hits 300 watts real, then buy a 400 watts real cooler minimum and pray everything will work good, 300 watts is threadripper territory.
So it's fake just because they didn't hit the same numbers as in other test (which you assume a priori was not fake)?

Lol okay.
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#14
Broken Processor
Looks like a good option for compact case cooling but wouldn't put a 12900k in I don't like leaving performance on the table 160w cooling for such a small form factor is impressive and I'd prefer to use it with a 12600k should be quite the little beast.
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#15
Metroid
ExcuseMeWtfSo it's fake just because they didn't hit the same numbers as in other test (which you assume a priori was not fake)?

Lol okay.
No, is fake in a sense is marketing bs, any sane person that read alder lake review will see this is bs because it will hit 300 watts easily.

Also they say this is for a 160w cpu right then they say alder lake is 125w, if you see that way then, an average joe will see it and say yeah it will work okay but in the end it was all a lie, intel 125w is 300w plus watts real. Yeah 125w singlethread real yeah hehe
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#17
napata
MetroidCheck the tests on even a 12600, it hits 300 watts very easily, probably they used few cores instead of all cores, meaning it's a fake test, people dont stay checking the cpu temp everytime they do something, so want to be safe than sorry? then cpu hits 300 watts real, then buy a 400 watts real cooler minimum and pray everything will work good, 300 watts is threadripper territory. I remember that i had to make a custom watercooling setup with a 480mm monster on my i7 920 at 4.2, it used to hit 350 watts real.
Why do you keep lying? You realize we're on the internet and people can easily fact check what you say, right? At stock settings the 12600k is locked to 150W max and it's 241W for the 12900k.

www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i5-12600k-alder-lake-12th-gen/20.html

See? No where near 300W. In CB the entire system drew less than 200W for the 12600K.

Besides these tests are not fake because a CPU can draw as much as you want it to. If you want your 12900k to draw 160W then it will draw 160W but this will result in lower clock speeds of 4.2GHZ all core, like they said.
Posted on Reply
#18
Metroid
napataWhy do you keep lying? At stock settings the 12600k is locked to 150W max and it's 241W for the 12900k.

www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i5-12600k-alder-lake-12th-gen/20.html

See? No where near 300W. In CB the entire system drew less than 200W for the 12600K.

Besides these tests are not fake because a CPU can draw as much as you want it to. If you want your 12900k to draw 160W then it will draw 160W but this will result in lower clock speeds of 4.2GHZ all core, like they said.
224 watts default clocks, 320w overclocked, anyway pretty close to 300 watts, still a 160w cooler will not work on a 224w cpu and by the way this is not a 160w cooler, my aio 240mm is a 150 watts cpu cooler.

Posted on Reply
#19
Valantar
MetroidI read and I dont believe that thing can cool a 300 watts cpu. The can say anything they want about testing and the bs, I still dont believe it. Not even my 240mm aio can cool a ryzen 150 watts well.
But they don't claim to. They even specifically mention the power draws they've been able to cool on these chips, and none of them are near 300W. They never claim full performance at stock settings. The press release says "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz."
Posted on Reply
#20
R0H1T
Metroid224 watts default clocks, 320w overclocked, anyway pretty close to 300 watts, still a 160w cooler will not work on a 224w cpu.
That's total system power, while 12900k should be able to exceed that, especially OCed, even an unlocked i5 or i7 is unlikely to get close to 300W unless you're pumping insane voltage to it. Coming back to Noctua ~ don't use this for anything above an i5 especially if you plan to OC them! As always ~ your mileage will vary :toast:
Posted on Reply
#21
Metroid
ValantarBut they don't claim to. They even specifically mention the power draws they've been able to cool on these chips, and none of them are near 300W. They never claim full performance at stock settings. The press release says "We have managed to dissipate up to around 160 W on the Core i9-12900K, pushing it to over 4.2 GHz, and up to 125 W on the Core i5-12600K running at 4.3 GHz."
Marketing bs, they will release it saying it is for a 12900 hehe, sheeps will buy and then cry few days after that hehe
R0H1TThat's total system power, while 12900k should be able to exceed that, especially OCed, even an unlocked i5 or i7 is unlikely to get close to 300W unless you're pumping insane voltage to it. Coming back to Noctua ~ don't use this for anything above an i5 especially if you plan to OC them! As always ~ your mileage will vary :toast:
Yes total power, cpu alone does 95% of that or more, there is no gpu on it, only the cpu.
Posted on Reply
#22
Valantar
MetroidMarketing bs, they will release it saying it is for a 12900 hehe, sheeps will buy and then cry few days after that hehe
You're clearly not familiar with Noctua's cooler ratings. Their website has detailed compatibility charts (that even differentiate between base and boost handling) for each cooler they make. There is 0% chance they will advertise that this can handle a stock 12900k.

Not many commenting on it here, but that foam duct kit is a brilliant addition. Should be really helpful for this cooler in many relevant situations. Good on Noctua for making it, and making it relatively cheap and flexible.
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#23
Metroid
ValantarYou're clearly not familiar with Noctua's cooler ratings. Their website has detailed compatibility charts (that even differentiate between base and boost handling) for each cooler they make. There is 0% chance they will advertise that this can handle a stock 12900k.
I have been buying noctua products since 2011, very familiar with their products and this is by far the most biased press release to date, well there was another one in the past but leave that aside for now. I love their products, this however is a marketing bs. Low profile cpu coolers are made specifically for 65 watts and lower, not for a 300 watts cpu ehhe, you see a misdirection when they cite a 12900k in their tests, 12900k is not a low end cpu.
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#24
Valantar
MetroidI have been buying noctua products since 2011, very familiar with their products and this is by far the most biased press release to date, well there was another one in the past but leave that aside for now. I love their products, this however is a marketing bs. Low profile is made for 65 watts and lower, not for a 300 watts cpu ehhe
A: it's a press release. It's marketing. What do you expect?
B: they never claim that it can handle a 300W CPU, they claim to have cooled 160W (and likely in a rather ideal scenario), and 125W on the other chip, indicating that YMMV.
C: if you're familiar with Noctua then it's rather odd to be making claims that go directly against their established practices for rating their products.

I've also seen plenty of SFF builds cooling well above 65W with an L9a or L9i. Depends on your case and airflow though.
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#25
Metroid
ValantarA: it's a press release. It's marketing. What do you expect?
B: they never claim that it can handle a 300W CPU, they claim to have cooled 160W (and likely in a rather ideal scenario), and 125W on the other chip, indicating that YMMV.
C: if you're familiar with Noctua then it's rather odd to be making claims that go directly against their established practices for rating their products.
a: yes agree.
b: I never said they claimed, I said this is not enough for that, yes they cited the 12900k in their tests which in my opinion was a mistake. This low profile cooler is not for the 12900k and yet they included in the tests to brag.
c: agreed, yes sometimes they go overboard but most of the time they are all right with their claims.
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