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CPU idles at 62C - 65C even after using Throttlestop, need guidance

Resotov

New Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2020
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Heyo!

Its been 8 months since I'm using a Acer Predator Triton 300 with a i5-9300H and a GTX 1650. After the temps started hitting 94C I installed Intel XTU and undervolted the cpu by -110 mV. It worked fine for a bit idling at 42 - 45 and while gaming maxed at 76 - 78.
Until Recently, XTU used to reset itself to default whenever I logged in (I think it was after an update).

So I decided to use Throttlestop instead. After reading numerous posts here, I decided to go with these settings. Core and cache offset by -100 mV (unstable at 125mV). But still my laptop is idling around 62C which makes it very difficult to even browse or type a bit. When playing games, it maxes around 92C and starts throttling. I really don't think any CPU should be idling at these high temps

I have absolutely no idea what to do. I messed with the windows power settings but not luck.
"Battery setting" is at Best Battery Life , "Maximum processor state" is at 99%.

Please advice me on how to fix this. I went through many of @unclewebb 's threads but couldn't find a solution.


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unclewebb

RealTemp Author
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
2,454 (0.54/day)
The most important thing you can do is find out what is running on your computer when it is supposed to be idle. Open the Task Manager, go to the Details tab, click on the CPU heading and organize the running tasks by CPU usage. The Resource Monitor is another good tool. I have an older 4 core CPU and it needs to spend less than 0.5% of its time in the C0 state processing the various Windows background tasks.


The individual cores should be spending 99% of their time in the low power C7 state when idle.


If you have something keeping your CPU constantly active, it is going to run hotter than it should.

If you have had your laptop for a while then it is probably time to replace the thermal paste. Watch some YouTube videos if you need to learn how to do this. It is basic maintenance for any performance oriented laptop.

"Maximum processor state" is at 99%.
There is never a good reason to do that. A slow CPU is an inefficient CPU. A slow CPU needs to spend more time in the C0 state consuming power. A fast CPU gets tasks done quickly and can spend more time in the low power C7 state. In this state, CPU cores are disconnected from the internal clock so they are running at 0 MHz. They do not need any voltage so are at 0 volts. This is the way modern CPUs run cool and save power.

Intel XTU forces the CPU to use the same offset voltage for the core and the cache. ThrottleStop does not have that limitation. Download Cinebench R20 for testing purposes. Leave the cache at -100 mV and start decreasing only the core. -125 mV, -150 mV, -175 mV, -200 mV. Run a Cinebench test each time to make sure you are stable and your scores or temps are improving.

Post a screenshot of the Options window. Looks like Acer low balled the thermal throttling temperature. Intel says PROCHOT Offset should be set to 0. Acer's decision to set this to 8 means your CPU starts thermal throttling too soon. If ThrottleStop does not show the lock icon above this setting, you can change PROCHOT Offset to increase your thermal throttling temperature.

If you combine all of the above tips, your laptop will thank you.
 

Resotov

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Thankyou so much for replying!
So I went through the "details" tab and I couldn't see any particular task hogging CPU usage.
I tried Cinebench at both cache and core at -100mV and the score was around 1000.

As you said I undervolted the core further to -135 mV while the cache is at -100 mV. Then Cinebench gave me a score of 1577. (reducing core more than cache definitely helps thanks)

I increased the offset to -140mV and got the Cinebench score as 1591. I wasn't sure of the stability so I turnd it down again to -135mV.
I have two questions now:
1) How do I know when TS Bench gives me an error? Is the Number displayed after the error count?
2) Why does my laptop still idle around 60 :(

This is the screenshot of Throttlestop and task manager when the laptop is Idle. (-135 core)
ss.png



This is the screenshot of the options tab.
options.png


Temperatures while using Cinebench: (It seems like only 1 of the core is reaching very high temps/ getting throttled )
while cinebench.png
cinebench.png


EDIT: Okay so after downloading HWinfo and testing a bit my suspicion was correct. It seems like only Core 1 is Throttling and all other cores are about 80C. What could the problem possibly be?
1 core.png
 
Last edited:

unclewebb

RealTemp Author
Joined
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Messages
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I wasn't sure of the stability so I turnd it down again to -135mV.
Why were you not sure of stability? Most of these CPUs are still stable with the core at -200 mV or -220 mV. There is no need to stop at -135 mV based only on your feelings. If the TS Bench reports errors or Cinebench R20 or some other stability test crashes, only then have you gone too far.

How do I know when TS Bench gives me an error?
If there were no errors during a test, at the top of the the TS Bench screen it will show the amount of time it took to complete the test. If there were errors detected, the TS Bench will show how many errors it found. If it says 5 Errors after a test, that is a problem. Your CPU or cache is not getting enough voltage.

Why does my laptop still idle around 60
Do you remember what temperature your CPU used to idle at when your computer was new? If there has been a significant change then you probably need to replace the thermal paste. This is normal maintenance for a laptop. Most people do not bother doing this. A few years later when their laptop starts running hot, they buy a new one and replace it. A very disposable society.

after downloading HWinfo and testing a bit my suspicion was correct.
Why did you need to use HWiNFO? ThrottleStop shows that PROCHOT 92°C is glowing red. That confirms thermal throttling has occurred. The maximum core temperature reported by ThrottleSTop was 94°C. That is the only core greater than 92°C so it is obviously the one that triggered thermal throttling. Overall it looks like ThrottleStop did a better job reporting the maximum temperatures. ThrottleStop runs at a higher Windows priority so it is usually first in line when reading temperature info from the CPU.

You do not need to check the Speed Shift EPP box on the main screen. Let Windows 10 manage this setting. Move the Windows power slider in the system tray back and forth and watch in the monitoring table in the FIVR window to see how the Speed Shift EPP value changes. An EPP setting of 84 works well. Using an EPP value of 255 slows your CPU down and makes it inefficient.
 

Resotov

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Oct 21, 2020
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There is no need to stop at -135 mV based only on your feelings.
Ok So I went all out with the core voltage and after using TS bench, I was able to go down to -175mV. I got only one BSOD when playing RSV2, so I turned it up a bit at -170mV just to keep a buffer and not be right on the edge. Thankyou very much for that, I can play at even higher settings now with no drops :)
I have turned off EPP too, like you said, let windows handle that.

This is normal maintenance for a laptop.
I'm still getting idle temps around 60 so I might look into repasting. Many people said that the stock thermal compound they got from Acer was BS so I think I might give it a go myself as anyway my warranty is almost up.
I'll update you after the repaste is done and thanks again for helping!
Cheers!
 
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