• We've upgraded our forums. Please post any issues/requests in this thread.

Thermaltake Announces Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester

btarunr

Editor & Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
34,335 (9.23/day)
Likes
17,427
Location
Hyderabad, India
System Name Long shelf-life potato
Processor Intel Core i7-4770K
Motherboard ASUS Z97-A
Cooling Xigmatek Aegir CPU Cooler
Memory 16GB Kingston HyperX Beast DDR3-1866
Video Card(s) 2x GeForce GTX 970 SLI
Storage ADATA SU800 512GB
Display(s) Samsung U28D590D 28-inch 4K
Case Cooler Master CM690 Window
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster Recon3D PCIe
Power Supply Corsair HX850W
Mouse Razer Abyssus 2014
Keyboard Microsoft Sidewinder X4
Software Windows 10 Pro Creators Update
#1
Thermaltake Technology, a leading computer components and power solutions brand, is more than ever committed to create a uniquely innovative and adventurous enthusiasm of been "committed to creating the perfect User experience”. The New Thermaltake Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester designs for DIY enthusiast and PC gamers with a builder-friendly philosophy to enable you to test and diagnose the power supply’s condition before damage occurs. Further impressive features of the new Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester included oversized LCD panel that accurately shows the value of each specific power rails and sets the latest standard in fast, easy and accurate PSU Tester. With the innovative design and unique style, the Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester evokes the next-generation legendry and is the number one choice for PC DIY enthusiasts worldwide.

Show full news post
 

mtosev

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
1,462 (0.31/day)
Likes
144
Location
Maribor, Slovenia
Processor Core i7 930
Motherboard Asus P6X58D Premium
Memory 6gb SuperTalent WB200UX6G8
Video Card(s) xfx radeon hd 5970 black edition
Storage Intel X25-M 80
Display(s) Dell UltraSharp 2209wa
Case Haf 932
Audio Device(s) Integreted sound card
Software w7
#2
Handy device. I hope that the price will be <50eur
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
517 (0.17/day)
Likes
119
Location
Chicago, Illinois
#3
Neat. However, the main reason power supplies fail is too much heat which is usually due to dust bunnies or bad fans OR power surges from women running the blow dryer, microwave and Pizzazz all at once. Well, at least in my experience.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,806 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,791
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#4
What??? No amperage values? That's a bummer. Could be handy if a PSU is suspect, but only if it's under $20.

I can't stand the marketing crap that TT uses, why can't they cut to to the chase and tell specifically what the unit does for the user and what it measures.
 

Bo$$

Lab Extraordinaire
Joined
May 7, 2009
Messages
5,626 (1.79/day)
Likes
971
Location
London, UK
System Name Desktop | Server
Processor Intel i7 2700k @ 4.4GHZ | AMD 5350 @ 2500MHZ
Motherboard Asus P7Z77-V Pro | Asus AM1I-A
Cooling GeLID Tranquilo | Stock Air
Memory Crucial Ballistix 2x8GB CL8 1600MHZ | Corsair Vengence 2x4GB CL9 1600MHZ
Video Card(s) Gainward GTX 780 Phantom GLH | PNY GTX 750Ti
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 250GB + 4TB WD Red | 2x Seagate Barracuda 2TB
Display(s) Samsung S27D390H + Asus VE276Q | Headless
Case Fractal Design R5 | CM Elite 110
Audio Device(s) Asus Xonar D1 w/Otone Stilo 5.1 and Creative Fatal1ty headset
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 850 G2| Corsair CX430M
Mouse Razer Imperator 2012
Keyboard Corsair K90
Software Windows 7 SP1 X64 | Ubuntu 16.04LTS
#5
What??? No amperage values? That's a bummer. Could be handy if a PSU is suspect, but only if it's under $20.

I can't stand the marketing crap that TT uses, why can't they cut to to the chase and tell specifically what the unit does for the user and what it measures.
well it is not a stress tester, merely tells you if the PSU is working or not, and if voltages are in spec or not
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,806 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,791
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#6
well it is not a stress tester, merely tells you if the PSU is working or not, and if voltages are in spec or not
Yea, more like a "stupid" light on your dashboard telling you your engine is running or not.

Most motherboards have input line voltage monitoring built-in and visible through the BIOS. Which is more accurate?
 
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,700 (0.76/day)
Likes
1,364
Location
Minnesota
System Name I Dub Thee Infinity
Processor Intel Core I7-3930K
Motherboard EVGA X79 Classified
Cooling Corsair H80
Memory 16GB GSkill Trident X
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC+
Storage SanDisk Ultra Plus 256GB, OCZ V2 180GB, 2x Toshiba X300 5TB RAID 0
Display(s) Acer XB270HU
Case Cooler Master HAF X
Audio Device(s) Creative X-Fi Titanium + Sennheiser HD 598 + Klipsch ProMedia 2.1
Power Supply EVGA 850W G2
Mouse Razer Naga 2014
Keyboard Gigabyte Osmium Cherry MX Brown
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#7
Yea, more like a "stupid" light on your dashboard telling you your engine is running or not.

Most motherboards have input line voltage monitoring built-in and visible through the BIOS. Which is more accurate?
On-board sensors can be incredibly unreliable and really should never be trusted completely.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
4,001 (1.32/day)
Likes
1,652
Location
Sarasota, Florida, USA
System Name Awesomesauce 4.3 | Laptop (MSI GE72VR 6RF Apache Pro-023)
Processor Intel Core i7-5820K 4.16GHz 1.28v/3GHz 1.05v uncore | Intel Core i7-6700HQ @ 3.1GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-X99-UD5 WiFi LGA2011-v3| Stock
Cooling Corsair H100i v2 w/ 2x EK Vardar F4-120ER + various 120/140mm case fans | Stock
Memory G.Skill RJ-4 16GB DDR4-2666 CL15 quad channel | 12GB DDR4-2133
Video Card(s) ASUS ROG Strix A8G Gaming GTX 1080 @ 2075/1368 boost | NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB +200/+500 + Intel 530
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 500GB + Seagate 3TB 7200RPM + others | Kingston 256GB M.2 SATA + 1TB 7200RPM
Display(s) Acer G257HU 1440p 60Hz AH-IPS 4ms | 17.3" 1920*1080 60Hz wide angle TN notebook panel
Case Fractal Design Define XL R2 | MSI
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster Z | Realtek with quad stereo speakers and subwoofer
Power Supply Corsair HX850i Platinum | 19.5v 180w Delta brick
Software Windows 10 Pro x64 | Windows 10 Home x64
Benchmark Scores GTX 1080 please?
#8
This may be handy to check voltages to see if they are anything close to normal, but I think of these as more of a gimmick than an actual test. The PSU must be under load to get accurate voltage measurements, and a plastic dongle can't do that, so that's where a real computer + multimeter are useful. This could be useful, however, if you want to make sure that the PSU isn't going to put 90V through your system before you plug it in, and burning out the dongle is a much better option in that case.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,806 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,791
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#9
On-board sensors can be incredibly unreliable and really should never be trusted completely.
I've heard that about temp sensors, but not voltage sensors. I have witnessed a BIOS setting for CPU voltage be significantly lower than what CPUz reports (assuming CPUz is using onboard voltage monitoring sensors, and is correct)

So I have to ask if you can provide any imperical data or tests? Not trying to flame, just wondering where the evidence is, then I'll shut up :)

The question is... which is more reliable, a TT product or motherboard voltage sensors?
 
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
2,700 (0.76/day)
Likes
1,364
Location
Minnesota
System Name I Dub Thee Infinity
Processor Intel Core I7-3930K
Motherboard EVGA X79 Classified
Cooling Corsair H80
Memory 16GB GSkill Trident X
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 980 Ti SC+
Storage SanDisk Ultra Plus 256GB, OCZ V2 180GB, 2x Toshiba X300 5TB RAID 0
Display(s) Acer XB270HU
Case Cooler Master HAF X
Audio Device(s) Creative X-Fi Titanium + Sennheiser HD 598 + Klipsch ProMedia 2.1
Power Supply EVGA 850W G2
Mouse Razer Naga 2014
Keyboard Gigabyte Osmium Cherry MX Brown
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#10
I'm actually waiting on a multimeter from someone. Don't know when he's going to be in town next though. Would be the perfect empirical evidence you need since we have the same motherboard, provided the measurements agree. I've been wanting to see if my motherboard's sensors are correct for quite some time.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
5,614 (1.90/day)
Likes
1,678
Location
San Diego, CA
System Name White Boy
Processor Core i7 3770k @4.6 Ghz
Motherboard ASUS P8Z77-I Deluxe
Cooling CORSAIR H100
Memory CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB @ 2177
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 680 CLASSIEFIED @ 1250 Core
Storage 2 Samsung 830 256 GB (Raid 0) 1 Hitachi 4 TB
Display(s) 1 Dell 30U11 30"
Case BIT FENIX Prodigy
Audio Device(s) none
Power Supply SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W Modular
Software Windows Pro 7 64 bit || Ubuntu 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores 2017 Unigine Heaven :: P37239 3D Mark Vantage
#11
Price needs to be sub $20, or else it's pointless as I have a PSU tester that does all the same things I purchased form Fry's for $13
 

Bo$$

Lab Extraordinaire
Joined
May 7, 2009
Messages
5,626 (1.79/day)
Likes
971
Location
London, UK
System Name Desktop | Server
Processor Intel i7 2700k @ 4.4GHZ | AMD 5350 @ 2500MHZ
Motherboard Asus P7Z77-V Pro | Asus AM1I-A
Cooling GeLID Tranquilo | Stock Air
Memory Crucial Ballistix 2x8GB CL8 1600MHZ | Corsair Vengence 2x4GB CL9 1600MHZ
Video Card(s) Gainward GTX 780 Phantom GLH | PNY GTX 750Ti
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 250GB + 4TB WD Red | 2x Seagate Barracuda 2TB
Display(s) Samsung S27D390H + Asus VE276Q | Headless
Case Fractal Design R5 | CM Elite 110
Audio Device(s) Asus Xonar D1 w/Otone Stilo 5.1 and Creative Fatal1ty headset
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 850 G2| Corsair CX430M
Mouse Razer Imperator 2012
Keyboard Corsair K90
Software Windows 7 SP1 X64 | Ubuntu 16.04LTS
#12
Yea, more like a "stupid" light on your dashboard telling you your engine is running or not.

Most motherboards have input line voltage monitoring built-in and visible through the BIOS. Which is more accurate?
probabily this as it will be calibrated correctly, the difference is that for instance your PC wont strat you can see if the PSU is working or not rather using this device rather than swapping everything out and then be stumped why it is still not working
 

@RaXxaa@

New Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
473 (0.15/day)
Likes
20
Location
Pakistan & US
System Name ROG
Processor AMD PhenomII X6 1090T 3.2-4.0 GHZ
Motherboard Crosshair IV Formula
Cooling Thermaltake Frio
Memory OCZ Gold 1333 4GB
Video Card(s) XFX Radeon HD 5850
Storage 1000GB SeaGate Sata
Case Thermaltake V4
Audio Device(s) Built in
Power Supply OCZ Modextreme 700W
Software Win7 & Win2k8 server
Benchmark Scores Almost 20300 in 3D 06 6.9 IN Cinebench 11.5 CPU Score
#13
Isint there a device superior to this called the multimeter?
 

Wile E

Power User
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Messages
24,318 (5.94/day)
Likes
3,682
System Name The ClusterF**k
Processor 980X @ 4Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 BIOS F12
Cooling MCR-320, DDC-1 pump w/Bitspower res top (1/2" fittings), Koolance CPU-360
Memory 3x2GB Mushkin Redlines 1600Mhz 6-8-6-24 1T
Video Card(s) Evga GTX 580
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, 2xSeagate 320GB RAID0; 2xSeagate 3TB; 2xSamsung 2TB; Samsung 1.5TB
Display(s) HP LP2475w 24" 1920x1200 IPS
Case Technofront Bench Station
Audio Device(s) Auzentech X-Fi Forte into Onkyo SR606 and Polk TSi200's + RM6750
Power Supply ENERMAX Galaxy EVO EGX1250EWT 1250W
Software Win7 Ultimate N x64, OSX 10.8.4
#14
I've heard that about temp sensors, but not voltage sensors. I have witnessed a BIOS setting for CPU voltage be significantly lower than what CPUz reports (assuming CPUz is using onboard voltage monitoring sensors, and is correct)

So I have to ask if you can provide any imperical data or tests? Not trying to flame, just wondering where the evidence is, then I'll shut up :)

The question is... which is more reliable, a TT product or motherboard voltage sensors?
Check out some extreme OCing threads at XS. They use multimeters to read voltages during benches because the boards' sensors are not accurate.

And why would anyone buy this when they can just buy a multimeter?
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2010
Messages
3,565 (1.25/day)
Likes
785
Location
By the Channel Tunnel, Kent, England
System Name Benny
Processor Phenom II 1055t @ 3.3GHz; 300x11; 1.380v; NB 2700; HT 2400
Motherboard ASUS Crosshair IV Formula (2002 BIOS)
Cooling Thermalright TRUE 120 Black + 2 Xilence Red Wing PWM 120mm (push/pull) + polycarbonate fan holders
Memory 8GB GeIL Ultra 2133MHZ C9 running at 1600MHz @ 7-7-7-21 1T 1.5v
Video Card(s) MSI Twin Frozr II GTX470 @ Stock w/CPU fan cable-tied on, as one of the GPU fans broke.
Storage 60GB OCZ Agility3 (OS);500GB WDC Grn; 1x1TB WDC Blk (Backup)
Display(s) ASUS PA823Q
Case Silverstone Raven 2 (all cables custom sleeved with velcro mod on side panel...)
Audio Device(s) X-Fi (Onboard) + Harmon Kardon HK6100 amp powering JVC HA-RX700's with Zalman mic
Power Supply Corsair HX650W
Software Win7 Pro x64
Benchmark Scores No benchies so making this space useful! Corsair M90, Logitech G19. Phobya FlexLight LED's (gawjus)
#15
At least it looks more sturdy than their last one. I've got one here, and it feels like it's going to break every time I use it. Very flimsy.
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2009
Messages
183 (0.06/day)
Likes
21
Location
Austria
System Name bazinga 2.8
Processor i7 2600k @ 4.4GHz
Motherboard ASrock Z77 Extreme 6
Cooling Corsair H100i GT
Memory 32GB 1600Mhz
Video Card(s) MSi GTX 980Ti G6 1506/4005
Storage 512GB 840EVO, 3TB HDD
Display(s) BenQ XL2420T |BenQ XL2411T
Case Nanoxia Deep Silence 6
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium
Power Supply EVGA 1000G2
Software Win10 x64
#16
And why would anyone buy this when they can just buy a multimeter?
Coz a good beginner multimeter is bout 150+€ i would only use Fluke and Voltcraft ones.
 

Wile E

Power User
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Messages
24,318 (5.94/day)
Likes
3,682
System Name The ClusterF**k
Processor 980X @ 4Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 BIOS F12
Cooling MCR-320, DDC-1 pump w/Bitspower res top (1/2" fittings), Koolance CPU-360
Memory 3x2GB Mushkin Redlines 1600Mhz 6-8-6-24 1T
Video Card(s) Evga GTX 580
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, 2xSeagate 320GB RAID0; 2xSeagate 3TB; 2xSamsung 2TB; Samsung 1.5TB
Display(s) HP LP2475w 24" 1920x1200 IPS
Case Technofront Bench Station
Audio Device(s) Auzentech X-Fi Forte into Onkyo SR606 and Polk TSi200's + RM6750
Power Supply ENERMAX Galaxy EVO EGX1250EWT 1250W
Software Win7 Ultimate N x64, OSX 10.8.4
#17
Coz a good beginner multimeter is bout 150+€ i would only use Fluke and Voltcraft ones.
First off, a generic multimeter is still more versatile and at least as accurate as this, while costing about the same.

And it's not exactly like all generic ones are absolutely horribly inaccurate. My $20 Wal-Mart special is exactly as accurate as my friend's $200 Fluke. They both read everything absolutely identically. His is just built better, and has provisions to be professionally calibrated, whilst mine is cheap plastic, and can't be calibrated.

Besides, even if it isn't as accurate, there is simply no need for a Fluke or Voltcraft to test power supplies and basic household stuff.

If I was doing mission critical work, yeah, I'd spring for the Fluke (even despite mine being as accurate as it is. It's better safe than sorry in a case like that.), but for home use it's completely unnecessary, and the generic one is still better than this thing that Thermaltake is selling.
 
T

twilyth

Guest
#18
But don't forget that there are some people such as moi who only know enough to use their multimeters for testing AA batteries. Well, I can also test ohms and continuity for AC, but that's about it. :)
 

Wile E

Power User
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Messages
24,318 (5.94/day)
Likes
3,682
System Name The ClusterF**k
Processor 980X @ 4Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 BIOS F12
Cooling MCR-320, DDC-1 pump w/Bitspower res top (1/2" fittings), Koolance CPU-360
Memory 3x2GB Mushkin Redlines 1600Mhz 6-8-6-24 1T
Video Card(s) Evga GTX 580
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, 2xSeagate 320GB RAID0; 2xSeagate 3TB; 2xSamsung 2TB; Samsung 1.5TB
Display(s) HP LP2475w 24" 1920x1200 IPS
Case Technofront Bench Station
Audio Device(s) Auzentech X-Fi Forte into Onkyo SR606 and Polk TSi200's + RM6750
Power Supply ENERMAX Galaxy EVO EGX1250EWT 1250W
Software Win7 Ultimate N x64, OSX 10.8.4
#19
But don't forget that there are some people such as moi who only know enough to use their multimeters for testing AA batteries. Well, I can also test ohms and continuity for AC, but that's about it. :)
Then you can also use it to test everything this device does. Positive on positive, negative on negative, take your voltage reading. Done.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
3,171 (0.84/day)
Likes
527
Location
Florida, US
System Name bits and pieces
Processor Intel Xeon E3-1230V3
Motherboard Gigabyte H97
Cooling stock
Memory 16GB for now
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 970 SC
Storage 256GB SSD + 3x 2TB WDs (storage)
Display(s) 2x BENQ GW2250 + ViewSonic 24"
Case Cooler Master Centurion 5 :P
Audio Device(s) X-Fi Titanium HD --- JBL 4412 Studio Monitors / Polk PSW505
Power Supply Antec 550W
Mouse Corsair M65 pro
Keyboard MS Sidewinder
Software Win 10 Pro x64
#20
First off, a generic multimeter is still more versatile and at least as accurate as this, while costing about the same.

And it's not exactly like all generic ones are absolutely horribly inaccurate. My $20 Wal-Mart special is exactly as accurate as my friend's $200 Fluke. They both read everything absolutely identically. His is just built better, and has provisions to be professionally calibrated, whilst mine is cheap plastic, and can't be calibrated.

Besides, even if it isn't as accurate, there is simply no need for a Fluke or Voltcraft to test power supplies and basic household stuff.

If I was doing mission critical work, yeah, I'd spring for the Fluke (even despite mine being as accurate as it is. It's better safe than sorry in a case like that.), but for home use it's completely unnecessary, and the generic one is still better than this thing that Thermaltake is selling.

I have a multimeter and a PSU tester thingy.
It's much faster to use the PSU tester.
especially if you're testing a whole bunch of them.
PLus, it's easier to show someone how to use it.
at least that's what I've found in my experience.
;)
YMMV
 

Wile E

Power User
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Messages
24,318 (5.94/day)
Likes
3,682
System Name The ClusterF**k
Processor 980X @ 4Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 BIOS F12
Cooling MCR-320, DDC-1 pump w/Bitspower res top (1/2" fittings), Koolance CPU-360
Memory 3x2GB Mushkin Redlines 1600Mhz 6-8-6-24 1T
Video Card(s) Evga GTX 580
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, 2xSeagate 320GB RAID0; 2xSeagate 3TB; 2xSamsung 2TB; Samsung 1.5TB
Display(s) HP LP2475w 24" 1920x1200 IPS
Case Technofront Bench Station
Audio Device(s) Auzentech X-Fi Forte into Onkyo SR606 and Polk TSi200's + RM6750
Power Supply ENERMAX Galaxy EVO EGX1250EWT 1250W
Software Win7 Ultimate N x64, OSX 10.8.4
#21
I have a multimeter and a PSU tester thingy.
It's much faster to use the PSU tester.
especially if you're testing a whole bunch of them.
PLus, it's easier to show someone how to use it.
at least that's what I've found in my experience.
;)
YMMV
If you are testing a whole bunch of them, it's most likely a job related thing, and you likely have access to better psu testers than this.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
3,171 (0.84/day)
Likes
527
Location
Florida, US
System Name bits and pieces
Processor Intel Xeon E3-1230V3
Motherboard Gigabyte H97
Cooling stock
Memory 16GB for now
Video Card(s) EVGA GTX 970 SC
Storage 256GB SSD + 3x 2TB WDs (storage)
Display(s) 2x BENQ GW2250 + ViewSonic 24"
Case Cooler Master Centurion 5 :P
Audio Device(s) X-Fi Titanium HD --- JBL 4412 Studio Monitors / Polk PSW505
Power Supply Antec 550W
Mouse Corsair M65 pro
Keyboard MS Sidewinder
Software Win 10 Pro x64
#22
If you are testing a whole bunch of them, it's most likely a job related thing, and you likely have access to better psu testers than this.
like?
:)
 

Wile E

Power User
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Messages
24,318 (5.94/day)
Likes
3,682
System Name The ClusterF**k
Processor 980X @ 4Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 BIOS F12
Cooling MCR-320, DDC-1 pump w/Bitspower res top (1/2" fittings), Koolance CPU-360
Memory 3x2GB Mushkin Redlines 1600Mhz 6-8-6-24 1T
Video Card(s) Evga GTX 580
Storage Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB, 2xSeagate 320GB RAID0; 2xSeagate 3TB; 2xSamsung 2TB; Samsung 1.5TB
Display(s) HP LP2475w 24" 1920x1200 IPS
Case Technofront Bench Station
Audio Device(s) Auzentech X-Fi Forte into Onkyo SR606 and Polk TSi200's + RM6750
Power Supply ENERMAX Galaxy EVO EGX1250EWT 1250W
Software Win7 Ultimate N x64, OSX 10.8.4
#23