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Club 3D Announces 2 New Video Splitters With 2x 4K @ 60Hz Support

Club 3D is proud to announce the next generation of SenseVision video splitters today with the introduction of two brand new splitters, CSV-1474 (USB-A to HDMI 2.0 Dual Monitor 4K 60Hz) and CSV-1477 (USB-A to DP 1.2 Dual Monitor 4K 60Hz) with this press release.

Former generation video splitters or USB graphic adapters based on USB 3.0 or 3.1 suffered from a limitation of 30 Hz if you were aiming at using the highest resolutions like 3840 x 2160 (4K). The latest developments from DisplayLink make it possible now that with CSV-1474 and CSV-1477 the resolutions can be taken to a new level. Not only one time 4K60Hz is possible, both splitters offer Dual Monitor functionality and each of the outputs can offer 4K 60Hz. The only requirement is to have a free USB Type A 3.1 Gen 1 socket in your device. The two new SenseVision products are powered by DisplayLink 6950 SoC. Our new future-proof products will be ready for shipment on June 30th. Wide availability of the products in the market we expect in the first week of July.

Microsoft Premieres Xbox One X

Sunday marked a milestone Xbox E3 Briefing as Microsoft Corp. unveiled the world's most powerful console, Xbox One X (formerly code-named "Project Scorpio") and its largest and most diverse games lineup in E3 history. Broadcast for the first time in 4K UHD on Mixer, Xbox showcased a record 42 games in its briefing including 22 with console exclusivity from creators large and small. Coming to all Xbox One markets starting Nov. 7, Xbox One X will retail for $499, 449 pounds, 499 euros, CA$599 and AU$649.

Xbox One X was designed to be the best console to create and play games on, putting the greatest graphic fidelity in the hands of the world's best game creators to create true 4K games. Head of Xbox Phil Spencer underscored that every game will play great across the Xbox One family, and Xbox One X also makes your existing library even better, with better textures, smoother frame rates and faster load times.

ASUS Unveils Three Freesync-enabled, High Refresh Rate Strix Monitors

ASUS is looking to have two distinct monitor product lines catering to either AMD or NVIDIA enthusiasts. Adding to their Swift line-up of NVIDIA G-Sync monitors, ASUS seems to be building up a Strix line as well, which features AMD's FreeSync technology to deliver the same fundamental variable refresh rate technology at a lower price-point (or so we hope.)

Starting with the flagship Strix monitor, the ASUS Strix XG32V has a 31.5" IPS panel with a WQHD resolution of 2560 x 1440. It's curved, so it envelops your FOV better, with the usual 1800R curve. This model can handle refresh rates of up to 144Hz, though readers looking to jump at this panel as we speak should wait for both Freesync range and pricing announcements. Connectivity-wise, we're looking at 2x DisplayPort 1.2, 1x HDMI 2.0, and an os yet unknown amount of USB 3.0 ports. ASUS has also added the inevitable Aura Sync lighting to the XG32V, materialized on both a ROG logo that shines down onto the desk, as well as an RGB LED suite on the back of the unit that can be synchronized with other Aura Sync-enabled PC components and peripherals.

ASUS Showcases the First Ryzen Powered Laptop: The ROG STRIX GL702ZC

At Computex 2017, ASUS showcased the first Ryzen-powered laptop, which the company had already teased a while back. The STRIX brings to an end a period of lacking competition in the laptop space; before this, if you wanted a high-performance gaming (or even professional-grade) laptop, you went with one with an Intel processor inside, or not at all. AMD is back in the fold, and Ryzen was the one who rose to the challenge.

The ROG STRIX GL702ZC packs a Ryzen 7 1700 8-core, 16-thread CPU; the absence of an X there isn't a typo, considering AMD themselves say the company's XFR (eXtended Frequency Range) is meant to accelerate CPU speeds under the right thermal conditions (and headroom), which a laptop almost surely wouldn't have.) This is a full desktop CPU (and I stress, an 8-core, 16-thread one) running inside a laptop. And this laptop dresses itself fully in red, with the graphics workhorse being an RX 580. The RX 580 is a great 1080p card, so it will feel right at home on the ROG STRIX GL702ZC's 17.3", 1080p IPS panel with FreeSync support. Let's just hope this is the first in a wave of AMD-powered laptops. We'll be here to see what happens with Ryzen-based APUs closer to the end of the year.

AOC Introduces the AGON AG251FG - 24.5", 1080p 240 Hz or 1440p 144 Hz, TN, G-SYNC

Update: It would seem reservations regarding the monitor's conservative resolution were right in the money. New details have come to light in that this monitor from AOC apparently supports two display modes: a 1440p, 144 Hz presentation, favoring resolution and graphics quality, or the aforementioned 1080p 240 Hz. This is interesting, offering a solution for gamers who play both competitive shooters and eye-candy-filled games, opting for blazing fast refresh rates or a higher resolution. It remains to be seen whether graphics quality takes a bigger hit than is solely limited to the decreased resolution: using a monitor ona non-native resolution decreases graphical quality, sometimes noticeably so. Still, this is a flexible solution, and I wouldn't be surprised to see users choosing this solution exactly because of the two different modes of operation.

AOC has added a new monitor to its line-up, which seems to be especially geared towards competitive gamers in twitch-shooters. Its astonishing 240 Hz refresh rate, 1 ms response time, and G-SYNC support are its greatest selling points, I would wager, though I bid you good luck in running most modern games at such frame-rates. To achieve this kind of screen refresh rates, AOC had to compromise in other areas, though: the AG251FG's 1080p resolution seems somewhat limited, as does the usage of a TN panel.

AMD Talks Improved Ryzen Memory Support, Ryzen 3, and Game Optimization

AMD, in an interview with Forbes, confirmed that it is working to improve DDR4 memory support of its Ryzen series processors, to enable higher memory clocks. AMD Ryzen users find it difficult to get DDR4 memory clocks to run above 3000 MHz reliably. With memory clock being linked with the chip's Infinity Fabric clock (the interconnect between two CCX units on the "Summit Ridge" silicon), the performance incentives for higher memory clocks are just that much more.

AMD confirmed that its AGESA update for May improves DDR4 memory compatibility, although it also stressed on the need for motherboard manufacturers to improve their board designs in the future, with more PCB layers and better copper traces between the DIMM slots and the SoC socket. The company assures that more updates to AGESA are in the pipeline, and would improve performance of Ryzen processors at various levels. The AGESA updates are dispensed through motherboard vendors as BIOS updates.

AOC Introduces the PDS241 and PDS271 Monitors - Designed by Porsche

AOC has partnered up with cr-designer extraordinaire Porsche to come up with sleek designs for two new monitors on its range. The PDS241 and PDS217 monitors both feature a (slightly yawn-inducing) 1080p AH-IPS panel, at 24 and 27" respectively. These come in thin as razors at 5.2mm, sporting a three-way-frameless design.

Apart from the sleek design and the stand (which is a hit-or-miss aesthetic choice from my perspective), there is nothing groundbreaking on offer here. You get technologies such as AOC's SuperColor WCG (100% sRGB coverage, and 90% coverage of the NTSC color space), flicker-free operation and low blue-light technology to help combat eyestrain. And these monitors won't set you back that much, at around $240 for the 24", and $330 for the 27", though you really are paying a pretty penny for that Porsche-christened design pedigree.

Source: TechRadar

Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation Update Brings Improved Performance to Ryzen

Some outlets are reporting that Stardock's Ashes of the Singularity is about to receive the much-referred-to patch that allows for improved performance on AMD's Ryzen line of processors. If you remember, rivers of ink flowed regarding AMD's Ryzen performance in gaming, with its monstrous, high-performance 8-core, 16-threaded design sometimes delivering performance below expectations. At the time, AMD clarified how Ryzen is a distinctive CPU architecture, similar yet fundamentally different from Intel's x86 implementation, promising upcoming patches from game developers that would allow Ryzen's architecture to truly deliver.

After Creative Assembly and Oxide Games vouched to improve Ryzen support, Oxide seems to be the first developer with a patch available (from version 25624 to 26118) that improves performance by up to 30%. Reportedly, it took the developers around 400 work-hours to improve the game code in respect to its execution on AMD hardware.

AMD Responds to Ryzen's Lower Than Expected 1080p Performance

The folks at PC Perspective have shared a statement from AMD in response to their question as to why AMD's Ryzen processors show lower than expected performance at 1080p resolution (despite posting good high-resolution, high-detail frame rates). Essentially, AMD is reinforcing the need for developers to optimize their games' performance to AMD's CPUs (claiming that these have only been properly tuned to Intel's architecture). AMD also puts weight behind the fact they have sent about 300 developer kits already, so that content creators can get accustomed to AMD's Ryzen, and expect this number to increase to about a thousand developers in the 2017 time-frame. AMD is expecting gaming performance to only increase from its launch-day level. Read AMD's statement after the break.

ASRock Lets Their DeskMini Micro-STX PCs Smile for the Camera

At CES 2017, ASRock showcased one of the most interesting PCs in attendance - particularly if you think interest is inversely affected by size. The name they gave it was DeskMini, and it ushers in a Micro-STX form factor, measuring only 210 mm x 157.5 mm x 81.9 mm. But mini-PCs are many these days. What makes this one so interesting?

Well, it's the fact that this seems to embody the perfect proportions - and compromise - between a high-powered PC and a puny NUC or Mini-PC. For one, it carries any choice of a Celeron/Pentium/i3/i5/i7 Intel processor on the socket 1151 (up to a i7 7700K); supports up to a max of 32 GB DDR4 at 2400 MHz on 2x SO-DIMM slots; features 2x SATA III ports (with power connectors) and 3x M.2 ports (two of which support Type 2280/2260 M.2 PCIe Gen 3x4 or a SATA SSD, while the other supports only a PCIe Gen3x4-based SSD); and your choice of either an NVIDIA GTX 1060 (on the GTX series) or an AMD RX 460/470/480 on the (aptly named) RX series.

AMD's RX 470 may see price-cut in wake of NVIDIA's GTX 1050 Ti Launch

According to TweakTown, AMD may be preparing to bring the fight to the as-of-yet unannounced GTX 1050 Ti with a $10 price-drop on their 1080p price-performance king RX 470 from the current $179, bringing the price down to $169. NVIDIA is purportedly planning to bring the GTX 1050 Ti to market at the $149 price point, with a rated TDP of only 75 W and apparently no need for additional power connectors (at least on reference designs). However, faced with a measly $20 difference from the supposedly higher-performing RX 470 - which could sometimes be up to 30% faster - the battle for the $150 bracket might prove to be an uphill battle for the green camp.

Add to that the latest updates unveiled by Oculus on Oculus Connect 3, with the RX 470 being stamped with the VR-ready approval, as well as the greater availability and lower price of FreeSync monitors (sometimes with as much as four times the number of FreeSync offers versus G-Sync ones), and it really does seem that AMD is poised to offer the best value in its price bracket. Of course, things get muddier if you take into account the current pricing landscape for graphics cards from either manufacturer (where most models are selling upwards of their MSRP).

Sony Launches AMD "Polaris" Powered PlayStation 4 Pro

Sony today announced an addition to its PlayStation family of entertainment systems, with the new PlayStation 4 Pro (PS4 Pro). The PS4 Pro isn't meant to succeed the PS4, and is still a "current generation" console, in that all of its games are compatible with the PS4, and there won't be PS4 Pro-exclusive games. What sets it apart is higher-resolution game rendering that looks best on 4K Ultra HD TVs. This doesn't necessarily mean that the games are being rendered at 3840 x 2160 pixels. They could be rendered at resolutions higher than 1080p, and using just the right upscaling algorithms, made to look significantly better than 1080p. Another key visual component is hardware HDR. The PS4 Pro falls in line with Sony's big push for 4K HDR TVs this holiday shopping season.

Under the hood, the PlayStation 4 Pro features an all new semi-custom SoC designed by Sony and AMD. The CPU component sticks to the "Jaguar/Puma" architecture, with 8 cores, but features higher CPU clock speeds. The 8 GB GDDR5 memory is said to run at higher clocks, too, and is bolstered by new lossless memory compression tech by AMD. The GPU component is where the action is. The GPU features over double the shading power of the PS4, and is based on the "Polaris" GPU architecture. The PS4 Pro also ships with a bigger 1 TB hard drive. There is seamless interplayability between PS4 and PS4 Pro. PS4 games you already own are being added with higher-resolution content meant for PS4 Pro. The console also has the muscle for PS-VR. For those still holding on to 1080p HDTVs, the PS4 Pro rewards with higher visual detail, more geometric complexity, and better effects, at that resolution. The PS4 Pro starts at $399.

SoC Powering Xbox One S Leverages 16 nm FinFET from TSMC

Microsoft's new slim Xbox One S console achieves its slimness - including its inbuilt power-supply, by significantly reducing thermal load of its key components. This begins at the heart of the console, its SoC. A semi-custom chip by Microsoft and AMD, the SoC powering the Xbox One S is built on the 16 nm FinFET process at TSMC. The chip powering the original Xbox One was built on the same foundry's 28 nm node.

The new SoC isn't merely an optical shrink of the original 28 nm chip down to 16 nm FinFET, Microsoft added a few components to the chip, including an HEVC hardware decoder, hardware CODECs for Blu-ray UHD with HDR; and a revamped display controller with HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2. The chip also performs 1080p to 4K UHD upscaling, with a native upscaling algorithm. The eSRAM memory bandwidth is increased slightly from 204 GB/s from 219 GB/s.

Source: Eurogamer

Doom (2016) Supports Vulkan API, Demoed on GeForce GTX 1080

At its pre-Dreamhack launch show for the GeForce GTX 1080, NVIDIA treated the audience with a fairly long gameplay segment from the "relentless" campaign of Doom (2016). The big takeaway from that reveal is that Doom will support the Vulkan API. Projected on a large-format screen at 1080p, with its details maxed out, Doom was shown running at upwards of 110 frames per second (fps), never dropping below 60 fps. The brief gameplay reveals that Doom could feature a pretty fun single-player campaign for fast-paced, almost Serious Sam-like, rapid monster-bash. You use unique new weaponry to take on hordes of monsters that come out of nowhere. We were at the event, and took a brief video.


AMD Radeon Pro Duo Performance Numbers Leaked

Ahead of its launch, performance numbers of AMD Radeon Pro Duo were leaked to the web by Expreview. Pitted against the $620 GeForce GTX 980 Ti, the $1,499 dual-GPU monstrosity is about 32 percent faster at 1080p (which sees CPU saturation), and on average 59.4 percent faster at 4K Ultra HD. The card is noted to conjure up more than playable frame-rates for all the games Expreview tested at 4K. Frame-rates were as low as 46 fps, and as high as 61 fps, indicating that the Pro Duo is the go-to single-card solution for Ultra HD. Find the review in the link below.

Source: Expreview, KitGuru

Patriot Releases New 200GB microSDXC Cards to Expand Flash Storage Category

Patriot, a leading manufacturer of consumer flash storage solutions, computer memory, SSDs, gaming peripherals and mobile accessories, today announced the release of the 200GB LX Series and 200GB Instamobile microSDXC. A natural evolution fueled by the ever growing and dynamic storage needs of today's mobile device users, these new high capacity cards offer an almost limitless storage solution for large HD movies, pictures, music, and productivity files.

Consumers will never miss a moment while on the go. These large capacity cards enable Android smart phone and tablet users to capture life's precious moments in stunning high definition while expanding the storage space of their device. Capable of recording over 18 hours of 1080p HD video and capturing up to 36,000, 3MB photos, users will never have to worry about running out of storage space on their action camera or mobile device.

AMD Radeon Pro Duo up to 51 Percent Faster than GeForce GTX TITAN Z

The new AMD Radeon Pro Duo, announced earlier today, takes the crown for being the world's fastest graphics card. According to the company's internal testing, in which it compared the card to its previous-generation flagship Radeon R9 295X2, and NVIDIA's fastest card, the GeForce GTX TITAN Z, on 3DMark FireStrike, at resolutions of 1080p, 1440p, and 2160p; the Pro Duo was found to be as much as 51 percent faster than the GTX TITAN Z. The three cards were tested on a machine with a Core i7-5960X processor, 16 GB of quad-channel DDR4 memory, Windows 10, v15.301 driver for the AMD cards, and GeForce 361.91 drivers for the NVIDIA card.

At 1080p, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 20150 points, compared to 16717 points of the R9 295X2, and 14945 points of the GTX TITAN Z, the Radeon Pro Duo leads the GTX TITAN Z by 34.8 percent in this resolution. At 1440p, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 11466 points, compared to 9250 points for the R9 295X2, and 7740 points of the GTX TITAN Z; the Pro Duo leads the GTX TITAN Z by 48.13 percent. Finally, at the resolution which really matters for this product, 4K Ultra HD, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 6211 points, compared to the 5121 points of the R9 295X2, and 4099 points of the GTX TITAN Z.

3DMark "Time Spy" Benchmark 5 Times Heavier on your GPU than "Fire Strike"

At a media event held in China, graphics card maker GALAX revealed Futuremark's next big 3D graphics benchmark. The unnamed next-gen 3DMark suite will include DirectX 12 game tests, including one titled "Time Spy." This game test (GT) features a museum-like 3D scene, rich in eye-popping lighting effects, and GT scenes from previous-generation 3DMarks serving as miniature exhibits within the test.

From the looks of it, your DirectX 12 compatible GPU is in for a trial by fire, in what promises to be an exciting next-gen 3D benchmark. The benchmark renders at 1080p, 1440p, or 4K, and is said to be "5 times" heavier on your GPU than "Fire Strike," Futuremark's DirectX 11 test that featured in the 2013 release of the suite. What's more, the benchmark will explicitly require Windows 10 64-bit, since it requires Direct3D 12 API support, and needs >2 GB of memory. Futuremark mentioned an "early" Q1-2016 launch for this benchmark.

A video presentation follows.

AOC Prepares Three Frontline Monitor Launches for CES 2016

AOC is giving final touches to a trio of high-end PC monitors, which it plans to unveil at the 2016 CES. These include the 35-inch curved C3583FQ, the 28-inch 4K U2879VF, and the stylish 27-inch I2781FH, pictured in that order. AOC teased the three without putting out too many specs. The I2781FH is likely a 1080p or 1440p display, with a stylish, single-piece metal stand, and HDMI inputs. The U2879VF features a 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160 pixels) panel, DisplayPort 1.2a (supports AMD FreeSync), and HDMI 2.0. The C3583FQ is a bit of an enigma, this 35-incher features a curved panel of a yet unknown resolution, but which supports 160 Hz refresh-rates.

AMD Radeon GPUs to Get Major Display Tech Overhaul in 2016

AMD is readying a slew of feature-set additions to its Radeon GPUs, in 2016, targeted at display technology. To begin with, AMD is redesigning FreeSync, its adaptive-sync technology, to work over HDMI. The tech currently requires DisplayPort 1.2a. For this to work, the display should support FreeSync over HDMI on its end, as well. It's not as if every current HDMI display gets adaptive sync. AMD posted a partial list of upcoming displays that support FreeSync over HDMI. With this, AMD is pushing for a new generation of notebooks and convertibles that feature FreeSync displays.

Next up, AMD is implementing high dynamic range (HDR) display support on next-generation Radeon GPUs. Current Radeon GPUs already support 10-bit (30-bit color or 1.07 billion colors, compared to 16.7 million colors on 32-bit); on desktop, Direct3D, and OpenGL apps. HDR will make images look more life-like. AMD claims that 1080p HDR content will look better than 4K SDR (standard dynamic range) content. AMD will also work with game developers to get HDR content on upcoming games.

NVIDIA Adds Five New Features to GeForce Experience

NVIDIA added five new features to its GeForce Experience suite, that helps PC gamers get the most out of their GeForce hardware. It begins with a new in-game overlay, which works much like the Steam overlay, giving you access to cool new streaming, recording, and screengrabbing features. Next up, is the new Broadcast feature, which lets you instantly stream your gameplay to Twitch and YouTube, at 1080p 60 FPS. Recording gameplay is as easy as bringing up the overlay and clicking a button.

GameStream co-op, which was teased recently, lets you stream your game across to a buddy over the Internet, who can take over your game in their web-browser, and get you through the level you're stuck in (you need at least a 7 Mbps Internet connection on both ends for this to work). Lastly, in-home GameStream (which lets you stream your game to your living room TV), can now stream in glorious 4K Ultra HD, at 60 FPS, and with 5.1-channel audio. The "instant replay" feature lets you play back the past defined time period of gameplay as video. The new features go live with the GeForce 358.50 drivers, if you don't see them, make GeForce Experience "check for updates."

Shuttle Announces the XS35V5 and XS36V5 Small Form Factor Computers

Shuttle Computer Group, Inc., one of the world's leading designers of small form factor (SFF) computers, announced its XS35V5 and XS36V5 with improved graphics performance. A host of features make them perfect for commercial applications including digital signage, kiosks, menu boards, and more.

"The latest 4K monitors need higher performance graphics, and our XS35V5 and XS36V5 make images and text pop out loud," said Marty Lash, director sales and marketing, Shuttle Computer Group. "They're easy to configure, have great connectivity, and provide cool-running, non-stop operation. They have everything an integrator needs for any display application."

Manli Announces its GeForce GTX 950 Graphics Card

Manli Technology Group Limited, the major Graphics Cards, Mini-PCs and other components manufacturer, today announced the latest mid range of 9 series graphics solution, Manli GeForce GTX 950. MOBA games have been increasingly popular recently, and some gamers may concern to upgrade their PC in limited budget, to unleash true gaming potential. Manli GeForce GTX950 will be the best choice.

Powered by second-generation Maxwell architecture, with 768 CUDA cores enabled and running at 1038-1216MHz, to provide 3x performance than previous generation GTX650. With the support of 2GB GDDR5 and running at 6610MHz, Manli GeForce GTX950 enhances the competitive edge in MOBA games, and provides more OC headroom for users to overclock in Manli TurboEngine software.

Skylake iGPU Gets Performance Leap, Incremental Upgrade for CPU Performance

With its 6th generation Core "Skylake" processors, Intel is throwing in everything it's got, into increasing performance of the integrated graphics. This is necessitated not by some newfound urge to compete with entry-discrete GPUs from NVIDIA or AMD, but a rather sudden increase in display resolutions, after nearly a decade of stagnation. Notebook and tablet designers are wanting to cram in higher resolution displays, such as WQHD (2560 x 1440), 4K (3840 x 2160), and beyond, and are finding it impossible to achieve them without discrete graphics. This is what Intel is likely after. The aftereffect of this effort would be that the iGPU will be finally capable of playing some games at 720p or 900p resolutions, with moderate eye-candy. Games such as League of Legends should be fairly playable, even at 1080p. Intel claims that its 9th generation integrated graphics will over a 50% performance increment over the previous generation.

Moving on to CPU, and the performance-increase is a predictable 10-20% single/multi-thread CPU performance, over "Broadwell." This is roughly similar to how "Haswell" bettered "Ivy Bridge," and how "Sandy Bridge" bettered "Lynnfield." Intel will provide platform support on some of its "Skylake-U" ultraportable variants, for much of the modern I/O used by today's tablets and notebooks, which required third-party controllers, and which competing semi-custom SoCs natively offer, such as eMMC 5.0, SDIO 3.0, SATA 6 Gb/s, PCIe gen 3.0, and USB 3.0. Communications are also improved, with 2x 802.11 ac, Bluetooth 4.1, and WiDi 6.0.

Source: FanlessTech

AMD "Fiji" Silicon Lacks HDMI 2.0 Support

It turns out that AMD's new "Fiji" silicon lacks HDMI 2.0 support, after all. Commenting on OCUK Forums, an AMD representative confirmed that the chip lacks support for the connector standard, implying that it's limited to HDMI 1.4a. HDMI 2.0 offers sufficient bandwidth for 4K Ultra HD resolution at 60 Hz. While the chip's other connectivity option, DisplayPort 1.2a supports 4K at 60 Hz - as do every 4K Ultra HD monitor ever launched - the lack of HDMI 2.0 support hurts the chip's living room ambitions, particularly with products such as the Radeon R9 Nano, which AMD CEO Lisa Su, stated that is being designed for the living room. You wouldn't need a GPU this powerful for 1080p TVs (a GTX 960 or R9 270X ITX card will do just fine), and if it's being designed for 4K UHD TVs, then its HDMI interface will cap visuals at a console-rivaling 30 Hz.

Source: OCUK Forums
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