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LG Unveils First OLED TVs with NVIDIA G-SYNC Support

LG Electronics (LG) has joined forces with NVIDIA to make gamers' dreams come true, adding support for NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility to its stunning 2019 OLED TVs (model 65/55E9, model 77/65/55C9). LG's newest OLED products offer blazing speed and stunning color reproduction, their superior performance and image quality validated through NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible testing to ensure a smooth and immersive gaming experience without flickering, tearing or stuttering.

With exceptional picture quality, low input lag and an ultra-fast response time, LG OLED TVs have already earned a reputation for delivering an optimized gaming performance. The addition of NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatibility raises the bar once more, guaranteeing even more immersive big-screen PC gaming on the company's industry-leading 4K OLED models, available in 55- to 77-inch screen sizes.

Alienware's 55", 4K, 120 Hz OLED Monitor AW5520QF to Release September 30th for $3,999

Remember that awe-inducing Alienware OLED monitor that we introduced you to back in CES 2019? Well, new information has been made known in regards to that particular 55", 4K, 120 Hz OLED panel. In essence, it will be releasing for avid, deep-pocket gamers' hands everywhere on September 30th, for the low, low price of $3,999. Add to that an impressive 0.5 ms response time and FreeSync support, and this will be a giddying piece of hardware.

The Alienware AW5520QF sports a 130,000:1 contrast ratio (due to OLED's pure blacks that are the hallmark of the technology), achieved with a mere 400 nits of brightness (which denies HDR support), as well as coverage of 98.5% of the DCI-P3 color gamut. 1x DisplayPort 1.2, 3x HDMI 2.0 ports, 4x USB ports, 1xS/PDIF audio line-out and 1x headphone jack round out the monitor's connectivity. There's also RGB lighting on the back of the monitor. If only it was something akin to Philips' Ambilight tech...

Sony PlayStation 5 Promises 4K 120Hz Gaming

Sony has finalized the design and specification of its PlayStation 5 entertainment system. Unlike buzzwords Microsoft threw around like "8K capable" for its "Project Scarlett" console, Sony has a slightly different design goal: 4K UHD at 120 Hz, guaranteed. The most notable absentee at E3 2019, Sony is designing the PlayStation 5 to leverage the latest hardware to guarantee 120 frames per second on your 4K display. Much like "Project Scarlett," the SoC at the heart of the PlayStation 5 is a semi-custom chip co-designed by AMD and Sony.

This unnamed SoC reportedly features an 8-core/16-thread CPU based on AMD's latest "Zen 2" microarchitecture, which is a massive leap from the 8 low-power "Jaguar" cores pulling the PS4 Pro. The GPU will implement AMD's new RDNA architecture. The SoC will use GDDR6 memory, shared between the CPU and GPU. Much like "Project Scarlett," the PS5 will include an NVMe SSD as standard equipment, and the operating system will use a portion of it as virtual memory. There will also be dedicated hardware for 3D positional audio. Sony also confirmed full backwards compatibility with PS4 titles.

ASUS Rolls Out ROG Swift PG349Q, a 120Hz Curved Ultrawide

ASUS today rolled out the ROG Swift PG349Q, one of the rare few curved ultrawide monitors with a high refresh-rate. This 34-inch display with a 21:9 aspect-ratio and 3440 x 1440 pixels native resolution, ticks at 120 Hz refresh-rate, and supports NVIDIA G-Sync technology. Its IPS panel has a rather obtuse 1900R curvature compared to the more common 1800R, with 178°/178° viewing-angles. Other vital specs include 300 cd/m² maximum brightness, 4 ms (GTG) response time, and 1000:1 static contrast ratio. The monitor offers flicker-free brightness adjustment, by using a non-PWM method to dim the LEDs illuminating the panel. The back side of the monitor and its stand are studded with RGB LEDs, which you control using Aura Sync RGB software. The monitor takes in HDMI and DisplayPort connections, and needs a USB connection to control the lighting. The company didn't reveal pricing.

CES 2019: Alienware Saves the PC Monitor World With a 55" OLED Gaming Monitor

So, that news title may be slightly too flashy for the actual product, but bear with me here: OLED is such an improvement over current mainstream display technologies that its transition to the PC monitor space is one of the most sought-after unicorns in this market. Alienware, via a partnership with LG (that's almost obvious), will be making this particular unicorn come to reality. The Alienware 55 OLED gaming monitor will feature 4K resolution @ 120 Hz, Variable Refresh Rate support via HDMI 2.1 (FreeSync? G-Sync? - all's still up in the air), DisplayPort 1.4, and 98 percent coverage of the DCI-P3 RGB spectrum with a candy of HDR support thrown in the mix.

ASUS Announces Trio of ROG Strix XG Monitors Supporting AMD's FreeSync 2

ASUS at CES showcased their upcoming lineup of ROG Strix gaming monitors specifically crafted for usage with AMD's FreeSync 2. The new monitors look to cater to most of the market with their diagonals and resolutions. These are premium solutions, with the smallest, the XG32VQR, sporting a 32" 1440p panel, 144 Hz native refresh rate, and VESA's HDR400 certification. The XG438Q ups the ante to a 43" panel and 4K resolution screen, with a 120 Hz base refresh rate (overclockable up to 144 Hz) and HDR 600, while the XG49VQ is of the ultra wide variety, featuring a DFHD (3840 x 1080) resolution, 144 Hz base refresh rate, and HDR 400.

All monitors feature a FreeSync 2 range of 48-120/144Hz, all employ a VA panel and a 4 ms response rating. The 43-inch sports 10-watt speakers, the 49-inch model has a pair of 5-watt speakers and the 32-inch XG32VQR lacks the completely. No pricing was available at time of writing, but these are ASUS' premium offering s for the FreeSync ecosystem, and with those specs, they likely won't come cheap.

LG Unveils the UltraGear 34GK950 Gaming-Oriented Monitors With Nano-IPS, FreeSync 2/G-Sync

LG unveiled their new UltraGear lineup of desktop, gaming-oriented monitors, which bring top of the line features for gamers. The monitors both feature a 34" diagonal and a 3440x1440 resolution. They both feature a 21:9 aspect ratio; brightness is left at a relatively sparse 400 nits (with VESA's DisplayHDR standard compliance) and static contrast only reaches 1000:1. The G-Sync panel (UltraGear 34GK950G-B) offers up to 120 Hz refresh rates with 4 ms GtG response times (via overclocking, only 100 Hz out-of-the-box), while the FreeSync 2 monitor (34GK950F-B) brings that up a notch to 144 Hz with 5 ms GtG response times.

The usage of nanoparticles applied to the screen's LED backlighting serves to absorb excess light wavelengths and improve intensity, purity, and accuracy of the on-screen colors - LG claims that both LCDs can display 1.07 billion colors while covering 98% of the DCI-P3 color gamut. There's ULMB support for the NVIDIA monitor and a similar technology for the FreeSync 2 display; LG's proprietary DAS (Dynamic Action Sync) which follows TV's Game Mode to cut post-processing of images to reduce lag; and there are brightness presets according to game types (FPS, RTS) for the G-Sync panel, while the FreeSync 2 features a black stabilizer tech.

NVIDIA's BFGD Solutions Delayed to Q1 2019, Will Cost an Awful Penny

NVIDIA's BFGD solutions (Big Format Gaming Display) are meant to become the ultimate gaming graphics display solution for gamers. their 4K resolution and 120 Hz refresh rates with G-Sync support are meant to become the baseline for smoothness in gaming scenarios, and the 1000 NITS peak brightness is meant to make HDR images that are relevant - differing from other, less "refined", shall we say, implementations. However, the hardware specs for these systems are high, parts are expensive and difficult to procure, and the process of integrating so much technology (including Quantum Dot tech and NVIDIA Shield) seems to be giving integrators a hard time.

43" Wasabi Mango UHD430 is World's First Commercially Available 120 Hz, 4K Gaming Monitor

Well, that wasn't so easy to see coming: that the world's first commercially available 120 Hz, 4K monitor would come to consumers' options via not one of the tech giants such as LG or Samsung, but a relatively low-key company out here in the west. Korea-based Wasabi Mango has started distributing their 43" UHD430 monitor, which brings with it (almost all) the amenities of a high-performance gaming monitor.

The UHD430 is additionally being marketed with HDR support, though it's the entry-level 400 nits brightness achieved here - a far cry from the generally accepted 1000 nits sweet spot. The panel is an IPS affair with 1200:1 static contrast ratio, 4:4:4 chroma support, a pretty respectable 5 ms response time, and a smattering of display connections: 3x HDMI 2.0 ports, 2x DisplayPort 1.4, 1x Toslink optical audio output, and 1x USB port. Sadly, FreeSync doesn't seem to be active for this panel. For users to achieve the 120 Hz 4K frequency and resolution, the dual DisplayPort outputs must be used. Otherwise, there's just not enough bandwidth for the awesome images being thrown to the display's pipeline. The 43" Wasabi Mango is available with free shipping for a surprising $1,399.
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